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#6411509 Jul 18, 2012 at 05:39 PM
Envoy
45 Posts
From Jane McGonigal in the TED Talk Games Can Change The World tells us games provide

1) Urgent Optimism
2) Social Fabric
3) Blissful Productivity
4) Epic Meaning

What do you think?
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#6412758 Jul 18, 2012 at 11:26 PM
Curator
69 Posts
I find these four personally appealing and want to explore them more. I try to imagine what school (at any level) would be like to evoke these four things.

I would only add that Well designed games provide the four. It made me think of an tongue-in-cheek rubric for evaluating games.

1) Urgent Optimism <---> Frantic Frustration
2) Social Fabric <---> Survivor Island
3) Blissful Productivity <--->Boring Busywork
4) Epic Meaning <---> May as well stay since epic has lost its meaning
**************************************************
Twitter: @chris_saeger
Profile: http://www.nasaga.org/profile/chrissaeger
Course Dashboard: http://www.netvibes.com/csaeger#Game_Mooc
**************************************************
in the beginner's mind the possibilities are many.
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#6416268 Jul 19, 2012 at 03:43 PM
Cataclysmic
128 Posts
While viewing this video, and thinking about my own gaming behaviors, I could see Urgent Optimism and Blissful productivity. I don't think I've come across epic meaning much, and since most of my games (with the exception of Ikariam) are single player, I am not really part of the social fabric.

Then, I started thinking about my MOOC participation, and, oddly enough, I think I have hit upon all 4 categories while participating in MOOC learning experiences.


#6411509 Games MOOC wrote:

From Jane McGonigal in the TED Talk Games Can Change The World tells us games provide

1) Urgent Optimism
2) Social Fabric
3) Blissful Productivity
4) Epic Meaning

What do you think?

--------
Feel free to call me "AK"
Blog: http://idstuff.blogspot.com
LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/koutropoulos
@koutropoulos
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#6421453 Jul 20, 2012 at 05:22 PM
Initiate
34 Posts
I'm feeling a little frustrated this week, and I think it has something to do with Jane McGonigal's premise. Maybe I am missing the point but I don't seem to connect the games we have looked at this week as being something to change the world. Now don't get me wrong, I understand the feelings evoked, and I love the action of the games, but I just don't see these games "changing the world." I took a look at Global Conflicts, which is actually the brainchild of a Danish company which creates a portal to a slew of different scenarios that students can explore. These are closer to the type games I am interested in....but am I being too picky about what I want from games, which is to be provide the excitement of a World of Warcraft while at the same time providing first rate educational value. Does this even exist? Anyone have a comment or suggestion about this.
Margaret M. Ridgeway, MSED
Concentration: Integrating Technology Into the Classroom
Teacher, St. Helena Central High School
Greensburg, LA
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#6464332 Jul 29, 2012 at 12:27 PM
Guides
561 Posts
GrannieTech, yes games that change the world are difficult to find. Just an awareness of a problem, is not a precursor to action. In the Hero's Journey, there is a "Call to Action" I don't think the games we saw had a "Call to Action" and frankly there is something a little unnerving about making Darfur a game. They may have been able to teach the fact that you have a hard life in a refugee camp, and that there are lots of camps, but really exactly what did you learn having a small girl avatar get squashed by a jeep? I am not really sold on this game even if I had my students play it in class, it seemed to be just a game and not really a learning or "call to action" tool. What is your take on that game?
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#6465036 Jul 29, 2012 at 02:50 PM
Initiate
34 Posts
Grasshopper,
I didn't play Darfur very long so I don't know if it gets more involved or not as play goes on. I made it to the water but not back to camp, and the in camp part I only played around with slightly. In any event, I would hope the game would entail more than just escaping the jeeps, which I found to be a little boring.

Even if it never challenges you any more than that, however, that type game shouldn't be used solely for info but to emphasize what is covered in a larger study of Darfur. I know kids that wouldn't remember anything about Darfur after a week of study, but playing the game creates a connection they will remember a lot longer. Sometimes, we are just planting seeds for the future and the actual plant may not surface for a long time and there is always a chance it will show up in a totally different way.

GrannieTech
Margaret M. Ridgeway, MSED
Concentration: Integrating Technology Into the Classroom
Teacher, St. Helena Central High School
Greensburg, LA
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