Notify Message
Forums
Page 1
Search
#6851645 Oct 16, 2012 at 08:29 AM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
August 2012 was declared the month of the Connected Educator by the US Department of Education. What do you think being a connected educator means? How connected to you have to be? What benefit does that bring you as an educator?
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



+1
#6854718 Oct 16, 2012 at 07:49 PM · Edited 5 years ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
By the way, congrats to Kae again for being recognized as a connected educator by Dept of Ed. :) Here are my responses to all the questions:

1. What do you think being a connected educator means?

In order to understand the need for being a connected educator, we need to examine what being "connected" means in the context of a globalized economy. Being "connected" can mean that one is in tune with what's happening in an event, a situation, a discussion, etc. through receiving knowledge about those occurrences from other people/networks.

In a tech-driven world where an overwhelming amount of global information comes in a fast and furious pace through the web, and filtering that information/noise by oneself has become an impossible task (after all, one is not a search engine :P), our ability to continuously stay current on new and credible information is contingent on us forming networks with others who can do the same. As educators, our survival (yep, MOOCs are a sure sign) would rely on us helping each other learn new information and trends in global education (increasingly, there will no longer be demarcations between educators and educational institutions when schools from all over the world are offering open access educational content online).

Therefore, being a "connected educator" would mean that 1) one is connected with those involved in education; 2) one contributes new ideas to others in education (today, this means sharing your thoughts/content via social media); 3) one learns from others the latest news on changes and innovations in the world of education.


2. How connected do you have to be?

I must offer the scary proposition that we become as connected to other people/networks as humanly possible by participating in all the social media/networks that we can stomach; this means that we need to follow and subscribe to RSS feeds, Facebook, Twitter, blogs, websites, emails (this old thing still works), aggregators, and MOOCs (of course!). Sure, my head feels like it's spinning most of the time with all the information I receive, but I know that I must educate myself minute-by-minute to remain current in academic conversations. Today, MOOCs are my top choice for staying as a connected educator.


3. What benefit does that bring you as an educator?

At the risk of repeating myself, I feel that I'm less likely to be a casualty of the tech world by knowing what new tech driven educational trends are coming at me. I am ahead of the "game" as a result of learning from other people who have similar interests. I hope that those of us who are participating in this Games MOOC are realizing the benefits for participating in this course. I already feel that I'm learning a lot more about games, game-based learning, gamification, and what other GBL educators are doing by posting in the forums.

In closing (mimicking the rhetoric of students), I believe that being a connected educator is the only way to stay competitive and current in the world of education.

On a side note, Pathbrite (a company that offers a unique curation tool for professionals and academics) has asked me if they can feature my portfolio on their blog (the update is coming). They recognize educators, especially those who are curators and content producers, as the new models for students to follow and become curators and content producers as well.

If you want your students to learn to be digitally literate so to "master" the web, I think you would have to first try and do the same; such is the way and life of the sensei!


I'll stop here, and cheers~
Sherry Jones (aka Mind Erasure)
Twitter @autnes
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+1
#6855126 Oct 16, 2012 at 10:08 PM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
Thanks but it wasn't me, it was the community of online educators here in the Games MOOC that made the Connected Educator Month Directory.

We are also planning our submitting our Networked Educator badge to the directory that is being compiled.




twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



+1
#6855240 Oct 16, 2012 at 10:58 PM
Bard
20 Posts
I agree with minderaser in that "connected" implies aware of and perhaps even "plugged in" to vibrant trends in education. It also implies connectivsm, networking, and valuing (humbly) the contributors and colleagues who are making inroads and bootstrapping through curricula which may have been dry and lifeless. It is NOT taking a holier (or more connected) than thou type of stance, pretending and offering pretentious judgements against educators who might approach things differently.

Education should not be a graveyard of practices that are so 10-20 years ago. Even if such dead approaches work for "some students," educators who either don't change or think they know it all are the ones who scare me.
And Happy Halloween to all, I guess... :)
XQC
XQC
Exquisite Corpse
+1
#6878972 Oct 22, 2012 at 10:03 AM
Guides
561 Posts
I believe (1) that it means most of what Mind Eraser posted, not much I can add, but I would say in this technological and innovative world you have to run all the time as fast as you can to stay in one place [Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland], (2) I think that the connections can be in person or the internet and from lurker to poster to presenting material on line or by publishing has to fit the style, role and ability of the educator, (3) benefits include, dare we say, "self-actualization?" It also enhances your classroom, your institution and if you post your results and ideas, or at least share with your co-workers, you are the tide that raises all boats. Yes I like sayings and proverbs.

Here is an interesting concept, via National Geographic on Taboo, a test you can take on their site and then link to your facebook, (you can set it from public to where you are the only one looking at the results. SCROLL DOWN it is on the right HOW TABOO ARE YOU?

#6851645 kae wrote:

August 2012 was declared the month of the Connected Educator by the US Department of Education. What do you think being a connected educator means? How connected to you have to be? What benefit does that bring you as an educator?

+2
#6885225 Oct 23, 2012 at 01:16 PM
Guild Officer
73 Posts
Being a connected educator is engaging in continued professional development. Because of the availability of information and research and the resulting decrease in the half-life of informational accuracy, it's necessary for an educator to participate in ongoing knowledge construction. In addition, it's necessary for educators to be familiar with the various methods of determining the accuracy, reliability, and usefulness of sources. Why? With the upcoming generation of students who have more memories with technology mediated communication than not, unexamined interactions based only upon interests and established ideals can stifle cognitive development. Therefore, as technology mediated communication has shifted from one way to interactive so, too, must pedagogy. I agree 100% with Mind Erasure that "we become as connected to other people/networks as humanly possible by participating in all the social media/networks that we can stomach..."
Games Based Learning Mooc (gamesMOOC)
FRCC Humanities Instructor
The best combination of technophile and luddite

Twitter @ThereseEllis
Google+ therese.catherine.ellis@gmail.com
+0
#6885716 Oct 23, 2012 at 03:01 PM
Guides
111 Posts
Uh...I...I think this question is above my pay grade, but I will give it the best my tiny brain can muster.

To me, being a connected educator is just that, being connected. First and absolutely foremost, there needs to be a connection with the students. If a teacher is regarded as "cold", "mean", "distant", or anything like that, students are likely to shut down and not perform as well as they could have, even if the educator is doing things really well on a mechanical level.

This is something I experienced over and over and over again when I was working in my campus computer lab. People would actually change physically depending on how they felt about their teacher. If they felt their teacher was accessible, they would stand up straighter, speak more confidently, and usually be in a good mood. If they thought their teacher was inaccessible, they tended to slouch, speak more quietly, and their voices were often full of despair.

Teachers are basically thought of as the oracle of the classroom. Students aren't likely (in my shallow personal experience at any rate) to go right to Google or Facebook or some online learning site when they have questions. They're much more likely to want to go to you, the educator.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
+1
#6886890 Oct 23, 2012 at 07:43 PM
Guild Officer
73 Posts
Definitely! I hadn't really considered just the interpersonal context but, right on! You're probably right about students wanting a teacher that's a subject matter expert. Although, I must admit that I'm a big proponent of giving them resource suggestions to investigate. I'll search with them, if necessary, but I don't like giving them the answer fullstop, dig? Do you have a preference? I suppose it depends upon the subject, topic, etc, as well. What do you think?

#6885716 Hawkye wrote:

Uh...I...I think this question is above my pay grade, but I will give it the best my tiny brain can muster.

To me, being a connected educator is just that, being connected. First and absolutely foremost, there needs to be a connection with the students. If a teacher is regarded as "cold", "mean", "distant", or anything like that, students are likely to shut down and not perform as well as they could have, even if the educator is doing things really well on a mechanical level.

This is something I experienced over and over and over again when I was working in my campus computer lab. People would actually change physically depending on how they felt about their teacher. If they felt their teacher was accessible, they would stand up straighter, speak more confidently, and usually be in a good mood. If they thought their teacher was inaccessible, they tended to slouch, speak more quietly, and their voices were often full of despair.

Teachers are basically thought of as the oracle of the classroom. Students aren't likely (in my shallow personal experience at any rate) to go right to Google or Facebook or some online learning site when they have questions. They're much more likely to want to go to you, the educator.

Games Based Learning Mooc (gamesMOOC)
FRCC Humanities Instructor
The best combination of technophile and luddite

Twitter @ThereseEllis
Google+ therese.catherine.ellis@gmail.com
+0
#6886996 Oct 23, 2012 at 08:14 PM
Initiate
26 Posts
I work alone, running a one-person library at a small branch campus. Before I discovered how to connect online, I had very little contact with other professionals. If I was lucky, I'd attend a conference every year or so, but mainly I relied on professional journals to learn about new developments in libraries and how people were using them. After a few years, I found some useful email lists and subscribed to them, and then I began to see the power of connecting electronically.

Today my problem isn't locating new ideas, it's putting a filter against the firehose. I rely on the connections I've made on Twitter to provide that filter. If I follow you and you post a link to your new blog post, I may read it. If I don't follow you or you don't post, I probably won't ever know about it. Unless, of course, someone that I follow knows about it, and reads it and posts the link. Tthat makes me highly likely to read it, especially if the poster is somebody I respect as knowing a lot about this topic.

I'm sure I miss a lot by relying on Twitter. There are probably fascinating things put up every day in a multitude of blogs, on Facebook, and in Google Hangouts. If could doubtless find them, if I wanted to spend all my free time looking. But the 400 or so fascinating people I follow on Twitter come from a multitude of backgrounds, and they share enough fascinating information to keep even an info junky like me happy.
Riven
+1
#6887247 Oct 23, 2012 at 09:33 PM · Edited 5 years ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
Grasshopper, I love that you answered #3 with "self-actualization." I think that's exactly what I'm doing when I try to stay constantly connected (and tweaked out) on social media. I'm learning SO MUCH from other educators by receiving real-time feeds that I become constantly worried about what I should be doing as an educator on a daily basis (I suffer existential crisis every time I sit in front of the computer). I also want to add that to be a connected educator, one should not just "follow" other people, but be "content producers" who contribute to the education community with new ideas. Honestly, "self-actualization" on the web goes hand-in-hand with shameless "self-promotion" (hahaha). See, I got recognized by a curation company for curating and sharing my own stuff with other MOOCers yesterday:

October 22, 2012 - "Portfolio Spotlight: Bobby Maknoon & Sherry Jones" by Pathbrite

I think the portfolio is the manifestation of my social media addiction. XP

And, I don't think I can stop . . .

Sherry Jones (aka Mind Erasure)



#6878972 grasshopper98 wrote:

I believe (1) that it means most of what Mind Eraser posted, not much I can add, but I would say in this technological and innovative world you have to run all the time as fast as you can to stay in one place [Red Queen in Alice in Wonderland], (2) I think that the connections can be in person or the internet and from lurker to poster to presenting material on line or by publishing has to fit the style, role and ability of the educator, (3) benefits include, dare we say, "self-actualization?" It also enhances your classroom, your institution and if you post your results and ideas, or at least share with your co-workers, you are the tide that raises all boats. Yes I like sayings and proverbs.

Here is an interesting concept, via National Geographic on Taboo, a test you can take on their site and then link to your facebook, (you can set it from public to where you are the only one looking at the results. SCROLL DOWN it is on the right HOW TABOO ARE YOU?

#6851645 kae wrote:

August 2012 was declared the month of the Connected Educator by the US Department of Education. What do you think being a connected educator means? How connected to you have to be? What benefit does that bring you as an educator?

Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+1
#6903434 Oct 27, 2012 at 03:41 PM
Guides
111 Posts
#6886890 ThereseEllis wrote:

Definitely! I hadn't really considered just the interpersonal context but, right on! You're probably right about students wanting a teacher that's a subject matter expert. Although, I must admit that I'm a big proponent of giving them resource suggestions to investigate. I'll search with them, if necessary, but I don't like giving them the answer fullstop, dig? Do you have a preference? I suppose it depends upon the subject, topic, etc, as well. What do you think?



Oh, I agree. I think students should learn to think for themselves (which is a scary thought for some), I just think that teachers should be availible if needed. The whole idea is for the students to learn the material, so you're probably right in not wanting to just give them the answer in most cases.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
+0
Page 1