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#6969510 Nov 11, 2012 at 11:08 PM · Edited over 1 year ago
Guild Officer
354 Posts
To Badge or Not to Badge? video recording from Virtual Worlds and Games UnSymposium. This was a unpanel discussion of the future of badges as assessment.

We have three badges associated with the Games MOOC during this iteration. What are they attempting to assess? Would you be able to add them to a resume or on LinkedIn?

Brave Beginner and video
Networked Educator and video
Games Based Learning Badge
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



+0
#6974256 Nov 12, 2012 at 11:12 PM
Initiate
108 Posts
I think that before you could really use them on a resume or the like, badges will have to catch on a bit more. Right now, unless you are dealing with a person or organization who understands what badges are and how they are being used, I think you would mostly get funny looks if you put them on a resume. My hope is that this will change, though!

Personally, I think you can use badges as either a game element OR as a form of assessment, as long as that assessment is basically "yes you did" or "no you didn't." In my classroom, I use them as a game element -- something students do not HAVE to get but can if they want to by pursuing activities that, while not necessarily integral to class, certainly enrich it.

I don't think I could have badges as a form of assessment and a game element, though. I think you have to decide how you want to use them and go with that. In girl guides (scouts), a badge is more a form of assessment -- you do the activities that go with it in order to earn the badge, and you must complete them to the "examiner's" satisfaction.

When you use a badge as a game element, I think it's more like an Xbox achievement -- you get it almost incidentally. Either option is valid, but I really do think you have to choose one!
Don’t do work that just exists within your classroom... do work that changes the world. -Will Richardson

http://www.gamifymyclass.blogspot.ca
+1
#6976852 Nov 13, 2012 at 07:03 PM · Edited over 1 year ago
Guild Officer
354 Posts
I just attended Educause last week. It's a higher education conference from the organization that issues .edu for colleges and schools. It has an IT and online learning focus.

I was asked to write-up a report on what I heard in sessions so I'm posting what I saw on badges at the conference.

Badges
Badges as demonstration of mastery rather than gamification were brought up in many sessions. The three programs referred to were:

Mozilla Foundation Open Badge Project
http://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2011/09/15/openbadges/

The Open Badge project is a system that allows the learner to signup and receive a badge earner account. Organizations that issue and display badges then put their information into the Open Badge project.

Mac Arthur Foundation Badges for Life Long Learning http://dmlcompetition.net/Competition/4/badges-about.php

Series of badge initiatives and research on the use of badges being developed by MacArthur Foundation.

Purdue Passport http://www.itap.purdue.edu/studio/passport/

This is a Badge system that Purdue University just adopted this semester. It is still a work in progress but faculty can issue badge that show in the student’s ePortfolio known as Passport.

Takeway: This discussion came up in several sessions. A combination of MOOCs and credentialing through badges may change how students approach higher education. This was also food for thought when it came to considering a move to competency based assessment.


twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



+0
#6978575 Nov 14, 2012 at 01:26 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
#6976852 kae wrote:

on badges at the conference.

Badges
Badges as demonstration of mastery rather than gamification were brought up in many sessions. The three programs referred to were:



It's interesting that many educators and admin seem to feel the need to separate badges from gamification. I'm not sure if this is a sign that gamification (at least in the past) has a bit of a stigma to it or if badges are a bit more accepted that other elements of gamification. Perhaps because we have so many people who associate them with credentialing and/or Girl Scouts (Girl Guides)?

As one of the original questions posted, "Would you be able to add them [badges] to a resume or on LinkedIn?" -- I agree with missrithenay about resumes. Badges probably wouldn't work well on resumes, especially paper resumes (do they still have those, lol?). However, due to the nature of LinkedIn, I think you might be able to use them there. It would really depend on what field you were in, I suppose.

LinkedIn, itself, has what it calls a badge to allow users to promote their profiles on other sites. http://homebusiness.about.com/od/linkedin/qt/linkedin-badge.htm. I know the concept isn't really the same, but it does give me the idea that people who look on LinkedIn to evaluate someone professionally is more likely to at least understand the concept of badges.

Also, the Purdue project looks very well organized. It appears that they're opening up the ability to give badges through their service to anyone who is an educator, although they are screening them. More info on this page: https://www.openpassport.org/Home/BetaApplication.

-Leedale
+1
#6978628 Nov 14, 2012 at 01:43 AM
Consigliere
61 Posts
Thanks for the summary, Kae!

I also attended EDUCAUSE, and I spoke with Desire2Learn reps about how badges will enter into LMS. There seems to be indication that badges will also be incorporated into LMS like D2L, because the badge conversation is just not going away.

Gamification is definitely taking over higher-ed, and it no longer seems like a "fad" as some educators would like to believe.

I've requested D2L to let me "play with" their e-Portfolio tool, which should be released as part of D2L Verion 10.1 package around June 2013, so that I can give them some feedback for improvement. I honestly believe the badges will be part of student's e-Portfolio package very soon.

If what I've learned from EDUCAUSE is any indication, the future of badges will involve collaboration between badge makers and LMS for higher-ed.

By the way, I'm totally displaying my own badges (from MOOCs) on my CV and Portfolio, and I think the badges would generate curiosity rather than funny looks. ;D


#6976852 kae wrote:

I just attended Educause last week. It's a higher education conference from the organization that issues .edu for colleges and schools. It has an IT and online learning focus.

I was asked to write-up a report on what I heard in sessions so I'm posting what I saw on badges at the conference.

Badges
Badges as demonstration of mastery rather than gamification were brought up in many sessions. The three programs referred to were:

Mozilla Foundation Open Badge Project
http://blog.mozilla.org/blog/2011/09/15/openbadges/

The Open Badge project is a system that allows the learner to signup and receive a badge earner account. Organizations that issue and display badges then put their information into the Open Badge project.

Mac Arthur Foundation Badges for Life Long Learning http://dmlcompetition.net/Competition/4/badges-about.php

Series of badge initiatives and research on the use of badges being developed by MacArthur Foundation.

Purdue Passport http://www.itap.purdue.edu/studio/passport/

This is a Badge system that Purdue University just adopted this semester. It is still a work in progress but faculty can issue badge that show in the student’s ePortfolio known as Passport.

Takeway: This discussion came up in several sessions. A combination of MOOCs and credentialing through badges may change how students approach higher education. This was also food for thought when it came to considering a move to competency based assessment.


Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+0
#6978716 Nov 14, 2012 at 02:12 AM · Edited over 1 year ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
Leedale, I just caught the part about the need to separate badges from gamification. Perhaps this trend is not a criticism toward gamification, but a reflection of a need for higher-ed to "bank on" badges?

This may sound sacrilegious, but I do believe badges and gamification are different concepts, since gamification is the use game mechanisms to render something game like, and badges are the visual representation of mastery of certain tasks (the tasks do not necessarily have to be based on game-based learning).

I think higher-ed might want to use badges to confer degrees to global students (and start charging some low fees to do this), rather than just associate badges with game-based learning. The badges are a convenient way for students to document the progress of their degree without having to attend a brick and mortar school. In fact, it seems that the future of a degree is a "salad bar" approach, where students can completely customize their education based on the career they are pursuing. This probably sounds horrible, but education will be individualized for the sake of corporate needs, rather than for the sake of identification with an institution. The term "degree" is also being vilified by the business world due to the high cost of obtaining a degree. The business world sees badges as an answer to degrees. The below article addresses this issue:

"Badges' Earned Online Pose Challenge to Traditional College Diplomas" by Jeffrey R. Young (Chronicles of Higher-Ed) (Jan 8, 2012)

Here's a snippet:
"Employers might prefer a world of badges to the current system. After all, traditional college diplomas look elegant when hung on the wall, but they contain very little detail about what the recipient learned. Students using Mozilla's proposed badge system might display dozens or even hundreds of merit badges on their online résumés detailing what they studied. And students could start showing off the badges as they earn them, rather than waiting four years to earn a diploma"

I think badges are going to become the main "tool" for charging students fees for taking individual courses that exactly serve their career needs, rather than the needs of completing a discipline. Therefore, the discussion of separating badges from gamification "frees up" the concept of badges from game-based learning, and allows for badges to be used in other arenas.


Got a headache just thinking about this stuff.
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Twitter @autnes
http://bit.ly/sherryjones


#6978575 Leedale wrote:

#6976852 kae wrote:

on badges at the conference.

Badges
Badges as demonstration of mastery rather than gamification were brought up in many sessions. The three programs referred to were:



It's interesting that many educators and admin seem to feel the need to separate badges from gamification. I'm not sure if this is a sign that gamification (at least in the past) has a bit of a stigma to it or if badges are a bit more accepted that other elements of gamification. Perhaps because we have so many people who associate them with credentialing and/or Girl Scouts (Girl Guides)?

As one of the original questions posted, "Would you be able to add them [badges] to a resume or on LinkedIn?" -- I agree with missrithenay about resumes. Badges probably wouldn't work well on resumes, especially paper resumes (do they still have those, lol?). However, due to the nature of LinkedIn, I think you might be able to use them there. It would really depend on what field you were in, I suppose.

LinkedIn, itself, has what it calls a badge to allow users to promote their profiles on other sites. http://homebusiness.about.com/od/linkedin/qt/linkedin-badge.htm. I know the concept isn't really the same, but it does give me the idea that people who look on LinkedIn to evaluate someone professionally is more likely to at least understand the concept of badges.

Also, the Purdue project looks very well organized. It appears that they're opening up the ability to give badges through their service to anyone who is an educator, although they are screening them. More info on this page: https://www.openpassport.org/Home/BetaApplication.

-Leedale

Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+0
#6979289 Nov 14, 2012 at 06:20 AM · Edited over 1 year ago
Guides
561 Posts
I know the feeling on the headache... I think you have really spoken well here and separated the badges out as "visual representations of mastery of certain tasks that. . . " may or may not be based on game-based learning.

I am trying to "badge" my classes at FRCC in the Spring, and discussed it with my current students. The idea of a badge for doing something you don't get a grade for and it disappears, didn't get them interested. When I pointed out it would be for a "demonstration of a defined skill" and I could at least write a letter at the end of class "a "To Whom it May Concern", with the badges they earned and on the back a definition of the skills needed to earn that badge they became interested. [would like to do a certificate with my college logo but don't think I could get administration approval on such short notice, if at all because of the need to keep those kind of things uniform. I understand that] One student said they would like the badges they earned to be on their transcripts. Which made perfect sense. There were lots of nodding heads on that statement. So they are willing to work extra, above and beyond to get a "skills/knowledge" badge but they want it to have value outside the classroom and outside the college. I was thinking I could probably construct the following badges, remember this is anthropology, all these badges would challenge students and would mean extra work for the instructor:

1. Standard Archaeological Site Excavation and Documentation. To get this badge they would need to excavate, measure, graph, number and identify several artifacts I would put in sand in a 12 x 12 inch box, and write standard site report.

2. Kinship. To get this badge they would need to create a six level deep kinship chart of their family or someone elses, utilizing the genealogy databases at public libraries and other sources. They would have all the symbols, lines and names (death-birth) and where born and trace through this the history of that family over time and location. A written history would be required.

3. Self-Guided Field Trip (I do this now for extra credit, but would expand it) To get this badge they would identify a cultural event different from their own ethnic / cultural background and research the event and culture, go to the event, interview participants, and write an ethnographic report.

And the list is growing.

You are correct these are skills, I could make a game, an augmented reality game of the field trip to identify cultural artifacts." I know someone who owns a huge indoor flea market, I think we could do an after hours [always difficult with community college students and their families and jobs] and have pre-identified articles from all decades from 1880 through 2010 and have them go find them and identify them, they could use mobile devices to look up the information. Give awards for every decade, etc. They would learn how determine usage and age. And have a darn good time.

I expect this will all shake itself out in the next ten years, but it hast to be something transportable like a virtual passport, think Mozilla maybe ahead on this one, but then it has to be SECURE, and accepted. I am reminded of a prisoner I had that went out and bought diplomas, a fraternity pin and even a Phi Beta Kappa pin., and doctored the diploma to look like it was his, wore the fraternity pin and had the PBK. He had "proof he was in Rotary, got thanked for his service on a charity board, ..... that was when you didn't have internet.

But I make my point, that until this badge thing gets worked out and is SECURE, all badges may be suspect, or proliferated so much that they lose value.

My question is how do we qualify a badge as having value and being valid?

+1
#6979381 Nov 14, 2012 at 07:08 AM · Edited over 1 year ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
Grasshopper:

Thanks for sharing your badge ideas (which are excellent examples of augmented reality badges by the way). You have raised more questions for me on the issue of badges than I had previously considered. Now my headache is even more intensified!

I did not consider the problems of getting administrators to approve a college issued badge, nor did I consider the possibility of students requesting the badges to show up on their transcripts.

Now I'm getting nervous (since I'm also thinking about implementing a badge system in 2013).

As your course progress, I would really love to know the results of your badgification (is that a word? hahaha). We must remain in contact, as I love your insights.

I wonder if there will be a Games MOOC III, because I seriously love the community being built here, and would love to watch the community continue to grow. The interesting thing about the connectivist MOOCs (like our good ole Games MOOC) is that it is a question generating machine (rather than just a course that dishes out information). An EDUCAUSE keynote speaker actually pointed out that xMOOC fails to generate knowledge for the very fact that it merely offers information for mass consumption.

Generating knowledge would require critical thinking, and a rigorous college course offers a privileged environment for initiating and invigorating critical thinking. In my personal experience, only the connectivist MOOCs have been able to stimulate my deeper thoughts on complex issues (whereas I am still expected to "memorize" information in an xMOOC for the purpose of passing the course). I wonder if badgification + xMOOC, and not traditional brick and mortar schools, would be the culprit for lowering the quality of higher-ed.

Wishful thinking that I could see into the future, but alas, I have not grown a third eye on my forehead, yet (if you accept Ray Kurzweil's argument that body modification with robotic parts will happen in 50 years time).

Gotta stop here before the discussion runs away from me XD
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Twitter @autnes
http://bit.ly/sherryjones


#6979289 grasshopper98 wrote:

I know the feeling on the headache... I think you have really spoken well here and separated the badges out as "visual representations of mastery of certain tasks that. . . " may or may not be based on game-based learning.

I am trying to "badge" my classes at FRCC in the Spring, and discussed it with my current students. The idea of a badge for doing something you don't get a grade for and it disappears, didn't get them interested. When I pointed out it would be for a "demonstration of a defined skill" and I could at least write a letter at the end of class "a "To Whom it May Concern", with the badges they earned and on the back a definition of the skills needed to earn that badge they became interested. [would like to do a certificate with my college logo but don't think I could get administration approval on such short notice, if at all because of the need to keep those kind of things uniform. I understand that] One student said they would like the badges they earned to be on their transcripts. Which made perfect sense. There were lots of nodding heads on that statement. So they are willing to work extra, above and beyond to get a "skills/knowledge" badge but they want it to have value outside the classroom and outside the college. I was thinking I could probably construct the following badges, remember this is anthropology, all these badges would challenge students and would mean extra work for the instructor:

1. Standard Archaeological Site Excavation and Documentation. To get this badge they would need to excavate, measure, graph, number and identify several artifacts I would put in sand in a 12 x 12 inch box, and write standard site report.

2. Kinship. To get this badge they would need to create a six level deep kinship chart of their family or someone elses, utilizing the genealogy databases at public libraries and other sources. They would have all the symbols, lines and names (death-birth) and where born and trace through this the history of that family over time and location. A written history would be required.

3. Self-Guided Field Trip (I do this now for extra credit, but would expand it) To get this badge they would identify a cultural event different from their own ethnic / cultural background and research the event and culture, go to the event, interview participants, and write an ethnographic report.

And the list is growing.

You are correct these are skills, I could make a game, an augmented reality game of the field trip to identify cultural artifacts." I know someone who owns a huge indoor flea market, I think we could do an after hours [always difficult with community college students and their families and jobs] and have pre-identified articles from all decades from 1880 through 2010 and have them go find them and identify them, they could use mobile devices to look up the information. Give awards for every decade, etc. They would learn how determine usage and age. And have a darn good time.

I expect this will all shake itself out in the next ten years, but it hast to be something transportable like a virtual passport, think Mozilla maybe ahead on this one, but then it has to be SECURE, and accepted. I am reminded of a prisoner I had that went out and bought diplomas, a fraternity pin and even a Phi Beta Kappa pin., and doctored the diploma to look like it was his, wore the fraternity pin and had the PBK. He had "proof he was in Rotary, got thanked for his service on a charity board, ..... that was when you didn't have internet.

But I make my point, that until this badge thing gets worked out and is SECURE, all badges may be suspect, or proliferated so much that they lose value.

My question is how do we qualify a badge as having value and being valid?

Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+0
#6986993 Nov 15, 2012 at 07:06 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#6979381 Mind Erasure wrote:

Grasshopper:

Thanks for sharing your badge ideas (which are excellent examples of augmented reality badges by the way). You have raised more questions for me on the issue of badges than I had previously considered. Now my headache is even more intensified!

I did not consider the problems of getting administrators to approve a college issued badge, nor did I consider the possibility of students requesting the badges to show up on their transcripts.

Now I'm getting nervous (since I'm also thinking about implementing a badge system in 2013).

As your course progress, I would really love to know the results of your badgification (is that a word? hahaha). We must remain in contact, as I love your insights.

I wonder if there will be a Games MOOC III, because I seriously love the community being built here, and would love to watch the community continue to grow. The interesting thing about the connectivist MOOCs (like our good ole Games MOOC) is that it is a question generating machine (rather than just a course that dishes out information). An EDUCAUSE keynote speaker actually pointed out that xMOOC fails to generate knowledge for the very fact that it merely offers information for mass consumption.

Generating knowledge would require critical thinking, and a rigorous college course offers a privileged environment for initiating and invigorating critical thinking. In my personal experience, only the connectivist MOOCs have been able to stimulate my deeper thoughts on complex issues (whereas I am still expected to "memorize" information in an xMOOC for the purpose of passing the course). I wonder if badgification + xMOOC, and not traditional brick and mortar schools, would be the culprit for lowering the quality of higher-ed.

Wishful thinking that I could see into the future, but alas, I have not grown a third eye on my forehead, yet (if you accept Ray Kurzweil's argument that body modification with robotic parts will happen in 50 years time).

Gotta stop here before the discussion runs away from me XD
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Twitter @autnes
http://bit.ly/sherryjones

[/quote_post6979289]



Always glad to help out in the headache department

I don't want to lose touch with you either. Yes we will be back in the Spring semester with another session of this MOOC, and there is one scheduled for Summer too. The summer is scheduled to offer an immersion for our particpants in a game, it is anticipated it will be Minecraft and Hawkye and Grasshopper98 will be your support and guide.

I think that I deal with those legal - logistical future issues because of my past work in strategic planning in high tech and a think tank. My job was to look into the future and identify any potential problems and have in place solutions so production or the project didn't lose any time. Also work in the Private Prison business really pushed thinking of possible problems and outcomes and putting in place stops at appropriate times.

I am big on that old Harvard Decision Tree, deal so much with "what ifs," and try to think of any possible branching of the timeline and needs. Harvard Decision Tree. I also use Gantt Charts a lot Gantt Chart I also think of my students as employees, and I am a firm believer in Theory Y Theory X and Theory Y, basically it is that if I have not given proper motivation, and support and tools, my "employees" (students) can't do the job I want them to do. I am hoping that BADGING will be part of the motivation.

I really don't think gamification or Badging could lower the quality of higher education, I am not sure it is doing the job now, and perhaps this will be an improvement. It is really difficult to think ahead, as instructors I think we get a class that works and we just keep teaching it, those total revisions take time! I am doing total revision of my classes for Spring (we don't get paid for this revision time and I expect I will be in about 80 hours to get this done and get all loaded up to the Desire2Learn shell and do the course mapping).

The problem is, and I know this will get comments about it isn't the same, but being an instructor can in some way be compared to being a prisoner. Here is why I would say that [remember I ran a private prison]. Prisoners are in a closed environment, only associate with other prisoners and are subject to the rules and policies of administration. This really doesn't allow for a lot of creativity in how you do your assignments, but you learn to fit. I learned to work within a system of management foreign to me since I am from private industry. Once a prisoner is released, there is one element that has been added to the equation, that is "TIME HAS PASSED" and he/she is less likely to be successful because the rules of the culture have changed. If all we do is teach the "safe" class material in the old accepted way, we are also less likely to be successful when time changed. If we don't improve our classes and find more effective ways of teaching, we will be left behind.

Someone told me the other day as i was saying there is so much to learn about gamification, that I wasn't on the leading edge of the technology, but that I was on the bleeding edge of the technology. I think that is true.

Fortunately I am at a college that has blood transfusions and am able to try out new technology and methods.
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#6987629 Nov 15, 2012 at 09:24 PM
Guides
111 Posts
#6986993 grasshopper98 wrote:

Once a prisoner is released, there is one element that has been added to the equation, that is "TIME HAS PASSED" and he/she is less likely to be successful because the rules of the culture have changed. If all we do is teach the "safe" class material in the old accepted way, we are also less likely to be successful when time changed. If we don't improve our classes and find more effective ways of teaching, we will be left behind.



This is a really good point, and an excellent rephrasing of what I've been saying for a long time - if schools don't teach on the most modern of things in the most modern of ways, students will be completely unprepared for the "real world." In high school I learned about the Civil War eleventy billion times but I was never taught to drive. I am pretty sure being taught to drive would have been a lot more valuable. Or what about being taught to cook? How about a computer class that taught from something more relavant than a typewriter textbook? How about ANYTHING to help students learn to take care of themselves? Schools really do need to change their paradigm and their pedagogy - not once or twice a century, but CONSTANTLY, since what it takes to make it in the world is CONSTANTLY changing.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
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#6988485 Nov 16, 2012 at 12:38 AM
Initiate
26 Posts
I'm delighted to know that there will be a Gamesmooc III & Gamesmooc IV! I love the community here, although a lot of what we discuss doesn't apply to me since I'm not a classroom teacher.

I tend to be a bit slow at getting up to speed on things, and I was feeling uncertain that I could complete the ConnectedEducator Badge requirements by the current deadline. I'll probably carry stuff over and work on it in the spring.

I'm also having a bit of trouble figuring out exactly what I still need to do for it. Probably need to spend more time in these forums.
Riven
+0
#6988565 Nov 15, 2012 at 03:56 PM
Initiate
26 Posts
Whoops, I meant the Networked Educator badge, of course. And one reason I want it is because I plan to include it on my annual performance report for work.
Riven
+0
#6997055 Nov 18, 2012 at 05:56 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
Hi Riven!

I believe that the requirements for the Networked Educator badge are specifically named on this page: http://gamesmooc.shivtr.com/pages/networkededucatorbadge. I apologize if you already knew about the page! Sometimes the simplest pages can be elusive, though!

The requirements that I see are as follows:


"What do I have to do to earn this badge (or badges within this collection)?

The Games Based Learning badge requires:
• Introduction during in the “What is Your Name and Your Quest” forum during the first week of the Games Based Learning MOOC

• Detailed game based learning original post (150 – 200 words) in a forum for each of the six weeks:

screenshot or screencapture
post tweeted out to the #gamemooc community link to game based learning blog article, research article or games based learning video in the original post that is also put up in one of the Games MOOC Diigo group.

• Reply (50 – 100 words) in the forum for each week of the Games Based Learning MOOC discussion forums.

• Second post SNKC [Social Network Knowledge Constructions] original post (50 – 100 words) in each week's forum that:

screenshot or screencapture
post tweeted out to the #gamemooc community
link to game based learning blog article, research article or games based learning video in the original post that is also put up in a Games MOOC Diigo group. http://groups.diigo.com/group/game-based-learning-research


• Participation in three (3) #gamemooc tweetchats over the course of the Games Based Learning MOOC.

• Curation of one (1) #gamemooc tweetchat posted in Games Based Learning MOOC journal http://gamesmooc.shivtr.com/journals by midnight the Friday directly following the Tweetchat.

• Curation of one (1) Games Based Learning MOOC live event in the journal http://gamesmooc.shivtr.com/journals by December 10, 2012.

• Create a portfolio such as Storify that curates the work done in the Games Based Learning MOOC to include a digital footprint page that demonstrates presence in an online community of educators, discussion posts, events, attendance and curation of live online events. This will include a reflection paper or video due December 10, 2012. [So you still have some time!]

This page is linked from the Home page. Again, if you already knew about this, I apologize. Just wanting to be sure!

If you're needing more details on the due date(s) and requirements, you can contact Kae on this site or email gamesmooc@gmail.com.

I think you've been doing splendidly, myself. I saw that you Storified a summary of the last Tweetchat! Awesome!

-LeeDale
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#7095237 Dec 11, 2012 at 05:23 AM
Consigliere
61 Posts
Am I supposed to post my homework here?? I'm not sure if I did the homework right, but here it comes:

GAMES MOOC II - NETWORKED EDUCATOR BADGE - MY BLOGGING ADVENTURE

I hope I covered everything.

Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+0
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