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#7610569 Apr 01, 2013 at 03:24 PM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
D'lightful shared this article with us through Google +

10 Compelling Ways People Plan To Use Google Glass

What do you think? Too ambitious or could it be taken further? What about asking your students what they think?
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#7611149 Apr 01, 2013 at 05:19 PM · Edited 4 years ago
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I did look at the ten ways, and most have merit to me, Some uses look like they are ready to rock and roll, gaming, surgery, star charts, and demonstrations are ready-made for this. I would love to have the glasses for star charts, much easier than holding my smart phone and balancing out the horizon to look at the phone then the heavens. Education has applications but because of the funding for education, it may be slower coming than application that is direct consumer or corporation purchase. As soon as youtubers get the $1500 I expect to see a flood of "how to videos." Should be quite the ride.

The embedded videos work then don't work, I will be back to edit if they don't fix themselves by tomorrow, but I have left you the link.

I also watched a youtube video on one of Apple's presentations on how they could be used. The real uses were masked by the razzle-dazzle, regarding being able to watch what the skydivers could see. Simple but effective. [It seems to load then not load so here is the link Google Glasses Demo

http://youtu.be/D7TB8b2t3QE

This is a good review by DChannel News. Anthony does a good job of pointing out some of the ways it can get augmented reality into the hands of the prospective customers. He does point out that soldiers and pilots have had this overlay of reality with mapping and other information well-ahead of google glasses.

[this is input correctly but seem a bit glitchy, here is the link] ]Google Glass and Augmented Reality

http://youtu.be/qdD5-woi_os
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#7617376 Apr 02, 2013 at 10:23 PM
Curator
29 Posts
Most of those I felt that it would be semi-straight forward to use google glass in those cases.

The spoken language translation on the fly is the one with the most issues. However, it's certainly worth a try. :)

Revolutionizing Higher Education is an easy win if given the resource support.

Augmented Reality Gaming will be easy. It's not a matter of "if" rather it's a matter of how much. :)
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#7619678 Apr 03, 2013 at 12:15 PM
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#7617376 finneycanhelp wrote:

Most of those I felt that it would be semi-straight forward to use google glass in those cases.

The spoken language translation on the fly is the one with the most issues. However, it's certainly worth a try. :)

Revolutionizing Higher Education is an easy win if given the resource support.

Augmented Reality Gaming will be easy. It's not a matter of "if" rather it's a matter of how much. :)



I agree with all of your statements. I was discussing augmented reality on the break between classes yesterday and gave them an example close to campus they seemed interested but it would take about $6-7,000 to implement that for a semester with iPads and full internet unlimited use connections, for 20 students, and there is actually some training time. Not all college students are as technologically savvy as we think they are.

They did like the idea of all having the same device and big enough to read. I do have to take into consideration reading difficulties and other disabilities.
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#7620848 Apr 03, 2013 at 04:41 PM · Edited 4 years ago
Fiero
26 Posts
#7617376 finneycanhelp wrote:

Augmented Reality Gaming will be easy. It's not a matter of "if" rather it's a matter of how much.



How much is too much you ask? In my opinion, this is too much (albeit humorous):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziHCvpikLh8
"A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude."
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#7626735 Apr 04, 2013 at 06:39 PM
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#7620848 Sam G wrote:

#7617376 finneycanhelp wrote:

Augmented Reality Gaming will be easy. It's not a matter of "if" rather it's a matter of how much.



How much is too much you ask? In my opinion, this is too much (albeit humorous):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziHCvpikLh8


Ha, I saw this quite some time ago. Y'know, I love gaming more than just about anything, but that's a liiiiittle too much.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#7630033 Apr 05, 2013 at 12:07 PM · Edited 4 years ago
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#7626735 Hawkye wrote:

#7620848 Sam G wrote:

#7617376 finneycanhelp wrote:

Augmented Reality Gaming will be easy. It's not a matter of "if" rather it's a matter of how much.



How much is too much you ask? In my opinion, this is too much (albeit humorous):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziHCvpikLh8


Ha, I saw this quite some time ago. Y'know, I love gaming more than just about anything, but that's a liiiiittle too much.


Yeah, Hawkye, it is a little too much for me, but doesn't everything new get taken to the extreme? I am reminded of something that made me laugh watching MI-5 [British Spys] on Netflix. They are dealing with the American CIA and mutter, "American, with them everything is a contest!" I know you have had some anthropology classes, and I am interested in your opinion as to what happens if we have sensory overload, is there a genetic component to the amount of sensory input reality and augmented reality that will reach a limit? If so, what happens to us then, do we go catatonic in the middle of Time Square?

And, further, are we living in sensory overload or sensory poverty? Check out this great article on that very subject Are We Living in Sensory Overload or Sensory Poverty?. Do you think that augmented reality of say, Google Glasses or Augmented Reality APPS will bridge the gaps, or have we already gone "A bridge too far?"
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#7630272 Apr 05, 2013 at 01:03 PM
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I doubt very much that we have an upper limit or "hard cap" on the amount of sensory input we can take - so long as it's gradual. Obviously we can't handle the shock of too much sensory input all at once (like going straight from a dark room into a brightly lit one.) We need time to adjust. However, we are an amazingly adaptive species, and once AR becomes the new "normal," people will stop questioning it, and, eventually, take it for granted.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#7630502 Apr 05, 2013 at 01:52 PM
Initiate
35 Posts
#7630272 Hawkye wrote:

I doubt very much that we have an upper limit or "hard cap" on the amount of sensory input we can take - so long as it's gradual.



I disagree. Educational Psychology emphasizes the awareness of cognitive load on our working memory. Sensory input is part of that.
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#7630701 Apr 05, 2013 at 02:42 PM · Edited 4 years ago
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Fair enough, I'm no expert. (Though I will ask you to cite your sources and turn in a 3-5 page paper discussing your findings. (Not really.)) I'm speaking from what is essentially a superficial perspective. There may only be so many things we can process at one time, but no one without a pre-existing medical condition is going to keel over in the middle of the street from wearing virtual reality glasses. Not even the Virtual Boy killed people, and that thing was a disaster.

I suppose there should be a "within reason" clause, but I will defer what is within reason to someone smarter than me. I don't suppose we have any human biology specialists or expert geneticists taking this course? (That would be AMAZING.)
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#7631660 Apr 05, 2013 at 07:02 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
I have to admit, my first thought when I heard about Google Glass was that I would be able to easily take videos to help people learn violin more easily. Imagine wearing the glasses, watching a video on how to position your fingers, while positioning your fingers. You would literally have a side-by-side comparison.

For me, I think that would be a huge advantage of Google Glass. The student wouldn't have to switch from what they're looking at to a book/tablet/computer/whatever. (Well, not physically. It would still require a little cognitive shift.)

On the other hand, I'm not really looking forward to the time when everyone is talking to and giving commands to their eyewear. :-)

On the other hand, I found an interesting article more focused on Educators with Google Glass: http://www.emergingedtech.com/2013/04/5-ways-google-glass-can-be-used-in-education/.

1. Learn new languages
2. Help creating presentations and research materials
3. Quick on-the-go research
4. Build portfolios
5. New courses, skills, and careers (based on Google Glass)

I think we'll see the impact of Google Glass especially in video education.

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#7634541 Apr 06, 2013 at 01:26 PM
Consigliere
12 Posts
Last year my sister got me a Richard Petty Driving Experience for my big 5-0 anniversary. While I have played the EA Nascar game with a cool steering wheel and study the mythology of Nascar weekly most of the year, the experience was fleeting. Five whole minutes flew by strapped in a Hans device. The Daytona Speedway with it 33 degree banks made the acceleration to 160 mph memorable. The sound of the 800 hp engine and feel of the jump suit was exhilarating. I wish I could have shared that experience moreso that others could understand what it meant to me rather than what it was like.

A few months later I visited the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center (FLETC) in Glenco, GA where professional trainers demonstrated high speed maneuvers on a flat test track. Fortunately, I was able to strap on a helmet and strap in for 90 mph J turns. Wish I had a pic of the dress I was wearing that day *smiles*

It occured to me instantly how Google Glass could be used as an overlay algorithm for trainees to demostrate their psychomotor driving skills, but with a new layer of story to test judgment and reaction. The entire event could be taped. A child could suddenly appear as if chasing a ball, or virtual gunshots could be seen requiring evasive action. Imagine the qualitative data that could analyzed. Imagine the scenarios that could be developed for practice to increase readiness to respond. Real life horror stories could become advantageous examples to use for training.

The opportunity to study the use of GG is amazing. I'd start with teachers in classrooms and schools to learn how to respond to varieties of dire threats. After they experienced scenarios, teachers' imaginations could find millions of ways to apply the technology more positively.

We learned recently that at the University of Central Florida where disaster was averted, the roomate of the shooter turned out to be a trained former USAF service member. He knew instantly when he saw the gun what was happening. Authorities' response thwarted a massacre. Training pays. I hope we see a new collaborations built around such technology.
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#7650215 Apr 09, 2013 at 04:13 PM
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Since I actually professionally drove stock cars, my son is a racer, my husband did some testing at Indy, I was impressed with your Petty Experience. Must have been fun. Never did 160, 125 maybe. I don't think you can share more than description because of the three dimensional real life experience, the sound, the smells, the touch, the 360 view, but like you said it can come close. I remember talking to Richard Petty years ago at a race, and he was joking, that "If everyone who comes to me and says if you put this on your car you will go five miles faster I would be doing 1000 miles an hour." I have always remembered that, that sometimes additions don't always add up. I think of that now when i am working on adding to my classes, there is a finite point when I am adding nothing in content only under the illusion I am.
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