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#7678105 Apr 15, 2013 at 10:00 AM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
Leedale started us on storyboarding.Storyboarding Presentation on Google Presenter

Do you have any additional tips and tricks?
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#7680651 Apr 15, 2013 at 05:37 PM
Guides
561 Posts
Yes, Leedale gave us a good start. That is a very clear presentation, easy to follow. I know that I should storyboard, goes to that old adage that you should put 80% of your time into preparation of a project and it goes faster. That is what those GANTT charts were all about. History of Gantt Charts. I am coming from private industry into education so it is nice to see a transferable skill :)

I did look at the storyboard informational site Information and Examples of Storyboards The link to StoryboardThat seems like it is easy to use and you could use it with your students. We, in education, don't always have a lot of resources (insert the word "money" here) and anything that is good and free on the internet is to be used.

Do I have any additional tips and tricks? Whooooo Nellie, maybe. I can see the use of a GANTT chart to keep me on track and not let me get bogged down on one chapter or scene of an Interactive Fiction, for example, a schedule always is a good thing. Coupled with the interactive storyboard, even if it is lowtech (like a physical bulletin board as a story board) or one that is on the internet, it should keep you on track and on schedule. Sometimes we forget that low-tech works. The Peace Game It certainly worked well for John Hunter.

I know most of us here have access to a lot of technology, but those among us shouldn't think they need it in order to create their story or storyboard. The interaction with media can come later. So let's all get started on our stories!

Did you hear the one about the stock-car driving grasshopper? :)
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#7691372 Apr 17, 2013 at 05:08 PM
Initiate
18 Posts
Well, the folks at UW taught me to use a whiteboard to plan out my game design. I have a couple of large whiteboards in my house just for this purpose that I bought at Habitat Restore for $7.

Also, I like concept-mapping programs like the bubbl.us that Leedale showed in the Storyboarding presentation. I've used Lucidchart https://www.lucidchart.com/ and Mindmeister http://www.mindmeister.com/ in this past, tending to prefer Lucidchart, but they're both pretty good. And you can use them collaboratively, too!

After watching the Storyboard presentation, I got an idea for creating a non-linear storyboard. I think I'm going to take one of the storyboard boxes and paste it into a concept-mapping program. Duplicating as many times as necessary. I'll post images and let everyone know how it goes when I try it out.
--DAB
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#7691685 Apr 17, 2013 at 06:16 PM · Edited 4 years ago
Guides
561 Posts
Ha, so much for technology, this is the THIRD time I am writing this because I keep forgetting if you use the back button, and try to come back to your reply, it doesn't. A quirk of the server/program. No sense getting my knickers in a twist over it :) Re-writes are always clearer ;)

I do like the online storyboarding programs, however, I have been seen using sticky notes... whatever works. I think we should always consider the message and that message design has to be part of what we do. Message Design Ok, it is Wikipedia, but a good place to start

How do you all think that Message Design fits with the Storyboarding, we can tell a story, beginning, core, end, but did we deliver the message? I like it that we are all trying to develop new ways and new ideas of delivery of information and content.
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#7701784 Apr 19, 2013 at 05:06 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
#7691372 Deelynn wrote:

Well, the folks at UW taught me to use a whiteboard to plan out my game design. I have a couple of large whiteboards in my house just for this purpose that I bought at Habitat Restore for $7.



That's a good idea. Whiteboards wipe off easily, which works out well if you have to change things around a lot. I've had some luck with using index cards, too. Those make it easier to move around chunks of the story to get an idea of different possible sequences.

Check out this link for others who use this same technique: http://www.story-games.com/forums/discussion/5528/flowcharts-for-game-design-dissecting-your-game-like-a-science-class-frog/p1
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#7710669 Apr 21, 2013 at 07:29 PM
Artisan
58 Posts
I use story boarding when making movies/ Animotos with my students. The two forms I use are similar but for different ways if thinking. One is a sheet with 8 square blocks on it and nothing else for those that want to use the boxes in their own own system. The other contains rectangular boxes broken into 3 sections labeled: text, images, other. They can be used as is or cut out to be ordered and reordered .
To each his own game ;)
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#7716430 Apr 22, 2013 at 07:44 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
#7710669 Lleshrad wrote:

I use story boarding when making movies/ Animotos with my students. The two forms I use are similar but for different ways if thinking. One is a sheet with 8 square blocks on it and nothing else for those that want to use the boxes in their own own system. The other contains rectangular boxes broken into 3 sections labeled: text, images, other. They can be used as is or cut out to be ordered and reordered .



I've tried it both ways with my students and have had varying results with the two. Some students would take a sheet of just boxes and draw just pictures (no reference to audio/text/etc). When given sheets of paper with areas for text/voice-over/etc, though, some would simply ignore those areas! It's all in the presentation, I've found.
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#7720512 Apr 23, 2013 at 02:00 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#7716430 Leedale wrote:

[quote_post7710669 user=1005121]

I've tried it both ways with my students and have had varying results with the two. Some students would take a sheet of just boxes and draw just pictures (no reference to audio/text/etc). When given sheets of paper with areas for text/voice-over/etc, though, some would simply ignore those areas! It's all in the presentation, I've found.



I think that this is one area where there are so many options and it really ends up being how someone works best, if they are comfortable with visual/computer or if they want sticky notes, or 3x 5 cards or even sheets of cards or boxes, or frankly, if they scratch it in the sand at the seashore and remember it when the tide comes in! ;) I am more of the big cork board and sticky notes reinforced on the board with push pins. Then I can put it into a computer storyboard, I just need that physical and visual representation I can touch first.
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