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This week's reading ....

by exquisite.corpse on Nov 05, 2012 at 09:08 PM}
From the article on Information literacy  I noted that these results are largely instructor opinion:

*Virtually all (99%) AP and NWP teachers in this study agree with the notion that “the internet enables students to access a wider range of resources than would otherwise be available,” and 65% agree that “the internet makes today’s students more self-sufficient researchers.”
• At the same time, 76% of teachers surveyed “strongly agree” with the assertion that internet search engines have conditioned students to expect to be able to find information quickly and easily.

I wonder how much of this "opinion" is the few anecdotal stories we share about students when things go wrong with their research. Who really notices when research quietly goes "right"?

From the Article about how Cell phones work in the classroom, I was struck by this passage:
But with subjective topics like world history, and a challenge like “Write one or two sentences why the Aztec Empire fell,” how can students convey a deep, meaningful understanding in just a couple of sentences?
“Writing concise paragraphs explaining complex concepts is incredibly powerful,” Sanders says, adding that the class also works on research papers and projects around historical characters in addition to these short polls.”
Touche! I guess this would also cover Tweeting, which forces one to be concise yet pithy.
I also was interested in this related Comment posted to the article site:
For those adamantly opposed to phones you have two choices: put your head in the sand and hope this is a "passing fad' or except that this technology is here to stay and actually develop a use for it in your class. The idea of "teaching digital citizenship" is a powerful one - if you just ignore phones, or treat their use as abhorrent behavior, kids will never learn how to be responsible with one!
(An interesting point of view)
Comments

4 Comments

Hawkye
"...if you just ignore phones, or treat their use as abhorrent behavior, kids will never learn how to be responsible with one!"

Considering the same also holds true for things like driving and alcohol, I'd have to agree. The "head in the sand" approach doesn't work very well for those things either.
'But with subjective topics like world history, and a challenge like “Write one or two sentences why the Aztec Empire fell,” how can students convey a deep, meaningful understanding in just a couple of sentences?'

I was struck -- stricken? -- with this idea. In honour of exquisite.corpse, and celebrating my newly-minted Bardship:

Write a haiku that for you encapsulates your view of Games MOOC:

"Bushfire smoke and heat
Northern change and Fall : new friends
Talk of games and growth"

(Traditional haiku has three phrases of 17 syllables in 5-7-5 pattern, and includes reference to the season/s.)
My reading this week:
"Plagiarism: Stopping Word Thieves"
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-3445_162-57536783/plagiarism-stopping-word-thieves

Interesting for an inside view of the habitual plagiarist's dilemma: like a fish-hook it's easy in, harder out.

Ben Barry, Facebook's Minister of Propaganda
http://www.fastcodesign.com/1671050/meet-ben-barry-facebooks-minister-of-propaganda#1

Ben Barry (no relation) at Facebook has a traditional screen-printing setup for old-fashioned posters. Interesting because it illustrates traditional paper not vanishing but taking on high-quality, artisan-type uses. This parallels the evolution of radio after TV came along.

http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/create-smartphone-app-infinite-monkeys-coding-knowledge-required/

Refers to idiot-proof (?) ways of creating smartphone apps, using Infinite Monkey or Buzztouch. I'm not brave enough to do it myself, but I can see the use of such things to more courageous educators...
@exquisite.corpse I agree that sticking your head in the sand isn't the way to go. I remember one instructor, who has moved on, only a year ago had in her syllabus, "no laptops no cell phones in class. If you are expecting an emergency phone call please notify the instructor in advance." I had to laugh at that because an emergency by definition is unscheduled.

I allow laptops/tablets even if I am in a a computer room if you are more comfortable with that, and I do allow mobile devices on "vibrate or silent" and do say that if you have to take a call, please just quietly stand up, say "excuse me" and leave the room. We all have lives! Texting can only be "in class, sorry" or ignored. I did take one cell phone away from a first time college student (out of high school) that constantly texted with phone under the desk. Gave warnings. Gave it to him after class and talked to him about why that was inappropriate and it never happened again.

I agree those one minute papers were something everyone latched onto that really is not a good idea. I tried it with a class and it really ended up being a "one hour paper" to get solid ideas presented. We had an excellent professional workshop at FRCC called Teaching with Purpose, that I attended, and we needed to do a presentation. Mine was entitled "God and Skittles" and spoke to two issues, first the one-minute paper fallacy, and second, the increased use of visualization to get to the heart of a matter using Woordle. At the end I let them do a one minute paper. I can tell you it is difficult to get an administrator (we had several for these final presentations) to quit writing ;)

The first of the slides played the theme from 2001 and the music they had for the one minute essay was the theme from Jeopardy, which happens to be 1.4 minutes. In case you want to see it here is the link in slideshare.com

GOD and SKITTLES the 1-Minute PAPER


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