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#6356310 Jul 06, 2012 at 06:59 PM
Envoy
45 Posts
Would you use the game in a F2F class? Hybrid or Online Course?

What would the subject or topic?

Would you use it as an icebreaker, discussion, assignment, assessment, other?
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#6364351 Jul 08, 2012 at 05:59 PM
Guides
561 Posts
I am using Darfur is Dying in a Sociology Class and a Cultural Anthropology Class, possibly in a Criminal Justice class since they know the other classes get to do it. We will be doing this at FRCC/BCC on July 10, 2012, so I will have more comments after it is over. We will be showing the film, The Devil Came on Horseback, after the "game is played" and then we will discuss the connections to the game and the film. The film is on Darfur destruction/warfare. All my Face-to-Face classes are in computer classrooms. They use them all the time. I may let my CCCOnline Cultural Anthropology class do the Darfur is Dying game and tell me their results, thoughts, and feelings on playing the game as an extra credit project. Haven't decided one way or the other.
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#6369331 Jul 09, 2012 at 07:55 PM
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2 Posts
I don't think I would use this - largely because I succeeded only in getting all the characters I tried captured while foraging for water. As I was unable to achieve anything I would not be able to help students who got stuck.
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#6369367 Jul 09, 2012 at 08:05 PM
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2 Posts
Sorry - I was referring to Darfur in Dying in previous post - posted before I had finished writing.

If I was still teaching biology I would probably use the DNA one, though I would have preferred a few more questions in the lecture bit and maybe for that to have been split up with something in the middle. It seemed a bit long - & if I was finding it a bit tedious by the end then my students probably would also.

The Viking one has some potential for use with literacy students and for me personally it was the best of the three. Having the alternative decisions pop up is good for literacy students as they don't have too much to read in one go, they also have to recall salient points in order to reach the decision
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#6370070 Jul 10, 2012 at 12:29 AM
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2 Posts
I played with the Darfur and Eye of the Donkey.

I feel that the Darfur one would be a good icebreaker for a social studies or language arts type class. It would be great as a conversation started about whether life was really like that or not when they went out foraging for water. That was the question I had in my mind and it would be great to follow-up with a conversation or article from someone who lives or lived there. I would use it.

I feel that the Eye of the Donkey was just a lecture. It lost my attention and was incredibly long (and I am a science teacher). I felt that the video timeline was more depressing because it showed how much longer I had to watch. The simulation itself was overly simplistic but did drive home the three stages. In all I would rank it on par with a Khan Academy video. I would not use this.
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#6372204 Jul 10, 2012 at 11:48 AM
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2 Posts
I have played all three games suggested, Darfur is Dying, Eye of the Donkey and Viking Quest I have found them to be quite varied in terms of fun to play and usability in the classroom.

I don't play games myself (or should I say here: I haven't :) ) and it took me some time to discover what to do in the Darfur is Dying game. I wouldn't use it myself but I think it could be useful in other classes to confront students with choices that have to be made by people in very different conditions.

As a science teacher the one most likely to be used by me would be Eye of the Donkey. The lecture part was quite long, too long probably, and the game part was not extremely exciting but did point out the essential steps of the PCR technique quite well. I would give this game a try in introducing this technique, but wouldn't be too surprised it the students don't like it much.

Viking Quest did little for me. I don't see much use for it as it doesn't include all that much information, while at the same time it wasn't clear to me why I had lost in the end, which would be unacceptable to students.
PrutserPro
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#6372497 Jul 10, 2012 at 12:52 PM
Cataclysmic
128 Posts
I would use this game in a class. I think I would use it mostly as an icebreaker activity to get people starting to think. I found the game frustrating (killed off all of the family and still wasn't able to get water!).

I could see several subjects being applicable including:
  • History
  • Geography
  • Political Science
  • Business
  • International Development
  • Philosophy

#6356310 Games MOOC wrote:

Would you use the game in a F2F class? Hybrid or Online Course?

What would the subject or topic?

Would you use it as an icebreaker, discussion, assignment, assessment, other?

--------
Feel free to call me "AK"
Blog: http://idstuff.blogspot.com
LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/koutropoulos
@koutropoulos
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#6372815 Jul 10, 2012 at 01:59 PM
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38 Posts
Keeping in mind that I work with elementary students I don't believe Darfur is Dying would be appropriate for them (parental objections come to mind), I do think Darfur is Dying would be acceptable for Middle and High School students. It was difficult because literally you were choosing which member of the family you were willing to sacrifice. It reminds me of a game our 2nd grade teachers play with their students about Ellis Island and the choices families had to make to stay together or send family members back to Europe. We do not understand those kind of choices in this land of affluence. Darfur is Dying would be very eye opening to older kids.

Eye of the Donkey reminds me of a biology game I played several years ago where we had to do a virtual DNA experiment for forensics. Yes the lecture was long on this and you do have to listen to it all in order to know how to do the experiments. But I can see 4th-8th graders doing this and having fun with it because it will be a new discovery for them.

I played Viking Quest and WON like a Boss...and now I am in charge of Denmark. It was simple enough elementary kids could do it, and it didn't require alot of eye/hand coordination (gaming skills) so that even those who don't play would be able to do it. I look at games from the perspective of those I teach and I think kids would like this, but older teens and college age would probably find this boring.

~Neemana
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#6385749 Jul 13, 2012 at 09:08 AM
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4 Posts
#6372815 Neemana wrote:

...and now I am in charge of Denmark.


Haha! You are? Good to know...
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