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#6364555 Jul 08, 2012 at 06:56 PM · Edited 7 years ago
Guides
12 Posts
I like to play Minecraft, and I own 2 out of 3 versions (Mac, Xbox 360). I also have convinced several friends to start playing, whether that be on their own or as part of a server. I'm a member of two private, vanilla (unmodified) servers where I play with friends, plus I help to run, build up, and administrate an experimental MinecraftEDU server for my position at CU. I enjoy both the survival mode as well as creative mode, both have their own challenges.

I love the sandbox nature, but for somebody with limited free time during semesters, there is ZERO learning curve compared to something like Second Life or Open Sim. There may be less flexibility here than with SL or OpenSim, but I feel like the ease of use and the simple ubiquity that can be achieved by running a server outweigh the shortcomings. Minecraft runs on terrible computers with the right settings and there are a ton of tutorials out there on how to get started.

Not to mention the mods! You can easily build your own avatar, use a mod that adds some semblance of physics to the game, change the appearance of blocks in your world, the options just never end. If you haven't checked out Minecraft, you can play an older version in your browser here.

I'm hoping to share some of the projects I've been collaborating on soon, but I would love any ideas people might have for something to create in-world. Here's a preview of something I built recently...

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#6365005 Jul 08, 2012 at 09:55 PM
Guides
561 Posts
Good Lord! I'm still looking for coal! I have a lot of catching up to do before Fall Class. I hate that darn game learning curve, it is nothing nothing nothing nothing nothing, ah I got it, level out! I am about on the second "nothing". . . That learning ramp is flat flat flat flat up!
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#6368678 Jul 09, 2012 at 05:20 PM
Initiate
7 Posts
Yes! I love so many things about Minecraft. I like that when I first played, there was no explanation or expectations. Once, my brother and I met (in different states) on his server and went on a giant expedition to find resources. Trying to navigate the map in unison was hilarious.

Right now I am working on getting the permissions necessary to play Minecraft in my classroom this Fall, as part of a larger game-based project. It would be great if we could chat about some of your experiences using MinecraftEDU.
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#6369628 Jul 09, 2012 at 09:29 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
I'm firmly convinced that Minecraft is built out of crack and rainbows.

I have never used it in the classroom (Any ideas on how to use it in a Multimedia course?), but I play it almost every day just for fun. I play the plain vanilla version, and I'm a member of the free Empire Minecraft site.

I love that, unlike WoW, there is a way to play it all by yourself and there's a way to play it with others. I adore the resource management and I really really hate the cave ambient sounds.
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#6370147 Jul 10, 2012 at 01:05 AM
Initiate
38 Posts
My 10 yr old is a Minecraft junkie right now. She is on a server and has VIP status and flys everywhere and morphs herself. Her and her friends are building settlements and making diamond swords. They spend just about as much time in creative mode as they so in survival mode. I have the PE of Minecraft on the iPads and I would really like to do something with that.
~Neemana
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#6379343 Jul 11, 2012 at 08:17 PM · Edited 7 years ago
Initiate
7 Posts
Hoooray for Minecraft! Have to agree Leedale - it is made of crack and rainbows.... and unicorns... if you run the right plugin! ;)

I've played in lotsa virtual worlds and games spaces with kids over the years, but I have to say what we are seeing with kids in Minecraft @ Massively Minecraft is just epic and amazing. The level of social agency, the diverse minecraft community the kids connect to, server modding, learning to facilitate and moderate.. i could go ooon and oon! ;)

Definitely my favourite game of 2011/12! ;)
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#6381682 Jul 12, 2012 at 11:09 AM
Cataclysmic
128 Posts
I downloaded minecraft for iOS, and I have to say "I don't get it".
Seems interesting, but...is it overhyped? What would you say to someone new to it? Why play it?
--------
Feel free to call me "AK"
Blog: http://idstuff.blogspot.com
LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/koutropoulos
@koutropoulos
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#6420576 Jul 20, 2012 at 01:53 PM
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12 Posts
#6369628 Leedale wrote:

I'm firmly convinced that Minecraft is built out of crack and rainbows.

I have never used it in the classroom (Any ideas on how to use it in a Multimedia course?), but I play it almost every day just for fun.



Yes, I do have suggestions for using it with multimedia. Originally I thought of this for architecture and planning, but after completing the whole thing, I think it fits amazingly with multimedia. There is a program out there called Mineways that allows you to take chunks of your MC world and create files ready for 3D printing, which is the focus of their site (that's how they make money). But you can also use the program to create 3D models that you can then import into Blender and other 3D softwares to create still images, movies, or even just play around with what you've created.

I think it's a little more simple to create the model in Minecraft (for me, anyway) and then import, plus you still have all the tools of Blender or whatever software is your choice at your disposal.

As for akoutropoulos's question, I think the posts about crack and rainbows are fairly accurate in describing why people play it. It's quite addictive, but it also provides an incredibly simple open-world platform for you to create anything you would like to. On my school server, I've made simulations for classroom use; on another server I've created a massive underground house complete with a labelled cave system; on Xbox 360, my friend and I have collaborated to build a massive castle, an arboretum, a hockey rink, and several other neat items.

Part of it is creativity, part of it is collaboration, and a hefty portion is the addictive factor. Once you get past the surface of the game (which can be hard to do on iOS or Xbox 360), there is a plethora of things to do from decorating your home to building cannons, there are even people out there who have built functioning 16-bit computers inside the game. The possibilities are endless.
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#6420828 Jul 20, 2012 at 02:53 PM
Guides
12 Posts
I should also add that I'm a heavy console gamer...

http://live.xbox.com/en-US/Profile?=hellflame
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