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#6373256 Jul 10, 2012 at 03:39 PM
Herald
32 Posts
I am the Principal of an inner city school for high-needs youth. I don't currently have a specific classroom, but I have been working with staff and students to promote the use of little, low-stakes/high-reward games in each classes. These need to be low-tech because the youth have varying levels of access to technology. The most successful game we ran this year was a sort of quiz-based scavenger hunt on our website (which was really something we started in hopes of driving student traffic to our website which almost none of them were using). You can go to our website to check it out (each instance of the game is tagged "contest.") We found interesting things about the mechanics of motivation, especially in the area of economic decision making (at a very sophisticated level) where students would often put off immediate prizes in hopes of a chance at a bigger prize at the end of the year. We will be running it again next year and try to have it cross all curricular areas and more activities.
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#6382451 Jul 12, 2012 at 02:25 PM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
hmmm....a whole school. I can't help but think a whole school would be great for an ARG. But I am pro- ARG. We'll be doing ARGs on week 5. But it sounds like gamification for behavior worked at your school. I think you need to tell us more. We do have student services people in this course ( lurking for now) who would be looking at the systemic use of games rather than in individual classrooms or programs.
twitter @kzenovka
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Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#6401921 Jul 16, 2012 at 10:26 PM
Consigliere
12 Posts
Hi, the institutional approach to game-based learning has all kinds of benefits from just-in-time performance support, remediation, cross-discipline mentoring, and above all creating a culture that elevates scientific thinking. Bravo.

The ARG idea is neat to create suspense making everyone wonder, could this be a game?

Breaking the bounds of the course (time) and the classroom (place) adds new levels of potential personalization while supporting learning communitities. Looking forward to hearing more as I want to do the same at my university.

@barbaratruman
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