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#6376530 Jul 11, 2012 at 09:22 AM
Initiate
9 Posts
My Viking Quest was unsuccessful. I was banished and sent to work on a cod fishing boat just of the Norwegian coast. Here are my thoughts on my experiences. http://wp.me/p1fqr9-Ey
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#6379453 Jul 11, 2012 at 09:00 PM
Initiate
4 Posts
My Viking quest was unsuccessful as well! I think I would have done ok if I hadn’t burnt down the Monastery! Your summary of the game is awesome, nice job!

AstroFukuda (Therese)
AstroFukuda
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#6379792 Jul 11, 2012 at 11:15 PM
Curator
69 Posts
Thanks for the reflections on the game. I got over and back didn't burn the monastery and had what seemed to be a fair amount of loot. Things were looking good I thought and then suddenly I am banished and told my quest failed.

I found it a disappointing experience. Failed is pretty strong. I didn't choose to go back and try again. At least I should have been given some kind of second chance in my opinion. But then, I am just not a viking I guess.
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Twitter: @chris_saeger
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in the beginner's mind the possibilities are many.
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#6383200 Jul 12, 2012 at 05:34 PM
Guides
82 Posts
I wonder why you were banished, your quest marked as "failed." Did you owe more in debt than your loot was worth?

Viking Quest is a very good example of the ways that games can model experiences -- even if it is 2-dimensional and rudimentary compared to what has followed since it was first published around 2000.

I mean, you can read words on a page about the Viking assault on Lindisfarne Abbey. You can because it was a pivotal point in European history. And I wouldn't say no to that! I love reading about the impact of the Viking raids on European history and culture.

But another way of learning about the Viking raids is to go through this Viking Quest, which models the experience for you. All too often we just read that the Vikings came, without gaining an appreciation for the incredible feat they accomplished by coming.

I first played Viking Quest in 2001, when I was teaching a course in Humanities. I liked it from the beginning for its classroom value. It appealed to my male students at the community college, and it's more challenging and less fantastical (more historically accurate) than the movie The Thirteenth Warrior, which was very big with students at the time. (It's a wonderful movie! I'm just unclear about what kind of history it actually teaches.)

I digress. I have never won Viking Quest, and I don't care. I know a great deal about the commercial aspects of a Viking raid, the investments made and the financial weakness of the raiders. I know a great deal about the carpentry skills involved, and about the importance of weather to the raiders. I have crafted the immortal raid repeatedly, and died in the doing, as a result, I know a lot about it! More than I can learn from your average humanities text, anyway!

:)

Beth
Beth Davies-Stofka, Ph.D.
twitter: eirwenes
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#6384391 Jul 12, 2012 at 11:48 PM
Initiate
34 Posts
Christopher - the point is not to try and fail and then quit, but to keep trying. It is manipulating the variables to see how it changes the results. Come on grasshopper....remember, you can learn a lot even when you fail.
Margaret M. Ridgeway, MSED
Concentration: Integrating Technology Into the Classroom
Teacher, St. Helena Central High School
Greensburg, LA
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#6396747 Jul 15, 2012 at 10:23 PM
Initiate
19 Posts
My first attempt was a dismal failure but as GrannieTech says, the point is to keep trying.

The learning really came from seeing why I failed and avoiding doing that the next time around. From this I learned that sailing down the coast rather than directly (which I initially did so that I'd be near land if there were ship problems) means that you're likely to be spotted, giving the monks warning.

I learned about the pros and cons of access to natural resources in ship building vs access to crew and I learned that not burning down the monastery meant that you could go back later to another crack.

All things that could have been written in a few paragraphs of text but having to make these decisions myself made this information so much more relevant to me.

By far my favourite of the 3 games.
My (occasional but getting better) edugaming blog: www.gamerlearner.com
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#6396782 Jul 15, 2012 at 10:43 PM
Guides
82 Posts
#6396747 colsim wrote:

All things that could have been written in a few paragraphs of text but having to make these decisions myself made this information so much more relevant to me.



Well, you just put this so much more precisely and efficiently than I could have hoped to! I think this is precisely what makes Viking Quest a great educational game. Nothing beats a game for letting us walk a mile in another's shoes, and I think it's why games are so amazing for education, or at least, so amazing for humanities education. I'll let others speak to math and science. But I'll bet games are amazing for those subjects as well! :P

Beth
Beth Davies-Stofka, Ph.D.
twitter: eirwenes
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