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#6433116 Jul 23, 2012 at 03:23 PM
Initiate
7 Posts
One of the things that concerned me about the "Introduction to Gamification" video is that it doesn't actually introduce what gamification is, and instead, mixes in games of different types as examples along with gamification systems and game elements.

Once a participant gets into the readings for the week, the differences will become more clear, but this could be a point of initial confusion (and is a mistake I do see commonly out there).

Gamification, according to Deterding, is the use of game design elements for non-game contexts. Gamification is an overlay on the real world. Many current cases of gamification focus on adding points, levels, badges, and achievements to real-world situations.

An educational game is a standalone activity that is not an overlay on the real world.

Farmville, one of the examples used in the video is not gamification.. it is a game with social media elements.

Teachers looking to create an educational game are doing something different than using gamification, and I want to warn against mixing these two activities up.

I did a basic introduction to gamification for the TL-DR blog at http://tl-dr.ca/?p=1871
Associate Professor
School of Information Studies, Syracuse University
http://becauseplaymatters.com
+1
#6437009 Jul 24, 2012 at 09:01 AM
Cognitive Di...
16 Posts
Scott, I just wanted to say that I loved your points about Gamification versus games/game elements/game systems. It's a bit of a pet peeve with me and deserves to be distinguished as something entirely different albeit in the same family tree, as it were. I will be briefly discussing exactly this topic with a group in the near future, and I appreciate your blog post that I can share.
-----
Catherine H Flippen
SL: Cat Thexios
WoW: Hecatera

Doctoral Student at the University of Florida
Upper School Faculty at Mount Vernon School
about.me/CatFlippen
@CatFlippen
+0
#6439027 Jul 24, 2012 at 03:48 PM
Initiate
34 Posts
Scott,
The beauty of your comments is that I originally came to this MOOC trying to find educational games BUT I am really having a transformation that may take a little longer. I actually want to put my classes through the gamification process. I'm beginning to see how that could be much more engaging for my students, but it also makes my work a lot more complicated.

It finally hit me when I realized this class is a virtual game in itself. Now the question is what next.

Grannie Tech
Margaret M. Ridgeway, MSED
Concentration: Integrating Technology Into the Classroom
Teacher, St. Helena Central High School
Greensburg, LA
+0
#6464200 Jul 29, 2012 at 11:51 AM
Guides
561 Posts
I appreciate this explanation of the differences. I was telling someone the other day that when I moved from the 'real world' of high-tech to the world of "education" that when I heard all the talk about pedagogy, I tried to rely on my lapsed Latin, not wanting to ask what the hell they were talking about, and couldn't figure out what "the study of foots" had to do with teaching. I had to quietly sneak away during a break and look up the word.

So are you saying that if I use games in my classroom to teach content, but they don't get anything for them, that is points, badges, etc., it is just an educational game? I am still a little confused, not unusual for me.

#6433116 Scott Nicholson wrote:

One of the things that concerned me about the "Introduction to Gamification" video is that it doesn't actually introduce what gamification is, and instead, mixes in games of different types as examples along with gamification systems and game elements.

Once a participant gets into the readings for the week, the differences will become more clear, but this could be a point of initial confusion (and is a mistake I do see commonly out there).

Gamification, according to Deterding, is the use of game design elements for non-game contexts. Gamification is an overlay on the real world. Many current cases of gamification focus on adding points, levels, badges, and achievements to real-world situations.

An educational game is a standalone activity that is not an overlay on the real world.

Farmville, one of the examples used in the video is not gamification.. it is a game with social media elements.

Teachers looking to create an educational game are doing something different than using gamification, and I want to warn against mixing these two activities up.

I did a basic introduction to gamification for the TL-DR blog at http://tl-dr.ca/?p=1871

+0
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