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#6696763 Sep 10, 2012 at 05:09 PM · Edited 8 years ago
Guild Officer
343 Posts
Along with G.A.M.E. Gamers Enhancing Meaningful Education, we are brainstorming a MetaCognition Badge on Games in Learning.


25 Man Raid by Center4EduPunx, on Flickr

So yes, it would be a badge about learning to learn using games.

Please give us your thoughts!
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#6702377 Sep 11, 2012 at 08:47 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
For me, learning to use games in education has been difficult. This may sound odd because I've been a self-proclaimed gamer for about as long as I've known Kavon (there's a correlation).

For me, my gut reaction to using games in the classroom is, "How do I truly relate it to what my class is about?" and "How do I control the situation once students are in the game?" (I might be a control freak and need therapy, so there's that.) There is that initial hump, that is usually gotten past with a splash of PowerPoint Jeopardy. :-D

So, are we still so anxious of veering off the Sage on the Stage approach, tiptoeing away from using testbanks and "proven" textbooks, and assigning XP instead of points that we need a "Congratulations you tried to bring games into the classroom!" badge?

Or are we beyond that?

Do we need to start recognizing those educators who not only brought a game (or games!) into their classroom, but they briefed the students on the game and its justification. They had students experience the game. Then they had students create artifacts of their learning (screen-captures, reflection papers, analyses of the game environment and/or characters, and so on?

Where do you think we are in the process, as a whole?

------------------

On a separate note, Kavon brought up the idea that we might discuss WHY we play games (not as instructors, just in general) in this forum. She brought it up in the video this morning.

If you have the time, you MUST take a gander at the Asking the Right Questions YouTube. It was an excellent session, especially for those of us who were sitting there saying, "But whether you call them assignments or quests...aren't they the same thing?" There were some very thought-provoking, practical, rubber-meets-the-road discussions and suggestions in that video!

Why do you game? I know why I game, but I'm interested to see what others say.
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#6705138 Sep 12, 2012 at 12:45 PM
Cataclysmic
128 Posts
I have to say, I am in the Jim Gee camp when he says "textbooks are the manual, use them as required, not as a primary practice" (ok, I am paraphrasing here :-) ).

I think that it is important to bring games in, and (if the learning objectives require it) let learners know what the purpose is of the given game (some games for instance require that you don't tell your learners much so that they can be surprised and act authentically).

As far as a metacognition badge goes...on the one hand, it seems like a good idea because you can develop the skill of learning. On the other hand, since learning never stops, what is the appropriate point in which the grantor of the badge awards it to the awardee? :)


#6702377 Leedale wrote:

For me, learning to use games in education has been difficult. This may sound odd because I've been a self-proclaimed gamer for about as long as I've known Kavon (there's a correlation).

For me, my gut reaction to using games in the classroom is, "How do I truly relate it to what my class is about?" and "How do I control the situation once students are in the game?" (I might be a control freak and need therapy, so there's that.) There is that initial hump, that is usually gotten past with a splash of PowerPoint Jeopardy. :-D

So, are we still so anxious of veering off the Sage on the Stage approach, tiptoeing away from using testbanks and "proven" textbooks, and assigning XP instead of points that we need a "Congratulations you tried to bring games into the classroom!" badge?

Or are we beyond that?

Do we need to start recognizing those educators who not only brought a game (or games!) into their classroom, but they briefed the students on the game and its justification. They had students experience the game. Then they had students create artifacts of their learning (screen-captures, reflection papers, analyses of the game environment and/or characters, and so on?

Where do you think we are in the process, as a whole?

------------------

On a separate note, Kavon brought up the idea that we might discuss WHY we play games (not as instructors, just in general) in this forum. She brought it up in the video this morning.

If you have the time, you MUST take a gander at the Asking the Right Questions YouTube. It was an excellent session, especially for those of us who were sitting there saying, "But whether you call them assignments or quests...aren't they the same thing?" There were some very thought-provoking, practical, rubber-meets-the-road discussions and suggestions in that video!

Why do you game? I know why I game, but I'm interested to see what others say.

--------
Feel free to call me "AK"
Blog: http://idstuff.blogspot.com
LinkedIn Profile: http://www.linkedin.com/in/koutropoulos
@koutropoulos
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#6705613 Sep 12, 2012 at 02:30 PM
Guides
561 Posts
I think that is a good idea as to why we play games outside of education. I have always played games, when you grow up isolated in eastern Colorado as an only child with grandparents who are busy with chores etc., if you didn't make everything a game and self-entertain, you would be a vegetable. Starting school in second grade instead of kindergarten didn't help my socialization. So for as long as I can remember I have gamefied my activities. I had to develop my own curiosity to not be bored. There was a saying in my family that, "If you are bored it is because you have no imagination." I remember counting how many steps it too me to get from the house to the stock tank water pump for a cool drink in the summer, and each time I tried to make it in less steps, as I grew taller I achieved lowering my "score," or how long of a chain could I make with locust tree leaves without it breaking. I just never quit. Even now I get personal satisfaction from building "my own little world" in that simple game of Minecraft, or MindlessCrafting as I like to say. . . but it takes me away from this world for a time and I am glad to see it again and know it is waiting for me
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#6710819 Sep 13, 2012 at 03:14 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
Have you ever noticed that different people play different games for different reasons on different days? :-D

One day I might play Minecraft all by my lonesome so that I can try to build the craziest house I can within three days in survival mode. Self-challenge...

Another day, I might play that same game with my mom and sister for the express purpose of exploring a mine together and socializing. Social interaction and collaboration...

Then I will log into an online Minecraft server and explore the "Wilderness" section looking at the amazing blocky creations that others have built. (Huge towers seem to dominate the list, but the creativity is remarkable. Sight-seeing, exploration...
Examples: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL9B83D943C0171B04) There are calculators built entirely within Minecraft that use the very basics of computer science to work. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UF2Vk3RVUls
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