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#6858345 Oct 17, 2012 at 03:05 PM
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111 Posts
#6858088 Jetsyn wrote:


Good day all! Finally able to start this opportunity. Not sure what I am even attempting to do - but so very interested. It is time to jump in and participate where I can!



Hi Jetsyn!

Glad to see you jumping in! In no time at all you'll have moved on from "what am I trying to do" to "what have I gotten myself into". Trust me, it's better than it sounds.

Welcome aboard!
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6859823 Oct 17, 2012 at 09:09 PM
Bard
20 Posts
#6818470 Jessi wrote:

Hi All!

I'm an associate professor of German and Applied Linguistics in northern Illinois. I do a lot of teaching in which I help language teachers incorporate various technologies into their instruction and I do a lot of online teaching in Second Life. The idea of incorporating games into my teaching (or vice versa) is very appealing to me and feels like a natural next step, so I'm going to follow along with this MOOC to see just how it's done.

I have been sporadically involved in gaming over the years, and now find that as my own children are more and more involved in it, that I'm developing a taste for it again. I seem to spend a lot of time installing Minecraft mods these days. :-)
Wow it sounds like you have some diverse interest & teaching backgrounds. I really like the laid back feeling of N Ill. I love the fact you feel that incorporating games feels like a Natural step. It's nice to have some educators here from outside of Colroad.

Because my students almost all react positively to our online meetings in SL, I have a feeling that they may be very interested and enthusiastic about the addition of a gaming component.

I am a frequent and enthusiastic user of Facebook and Twitter (@jplagwitz). I have accounts on Google+ and LinkedIn, but don't use them very regularly. Of course, I employ a CMS in my online instruction, so there's a lot of asynchronous online communication going on in my courses.

XQC
Exquisite Corpse
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#6859826 Oct 17, 2012 at 09:10 PM
Bard
20 Posts
#6858345 Hawkye wrote:

#6858088 Jetsyn wrote:


Good day all! Finally able to start this opportunity. Not sure what I am even attempting to do - but so very interested. It is time to jump in and participate where I can!



Hi Jetsyn!

Glad to see you jumping in! In no time at all you'll have moved on from "what am I trying to do" to "what have I gotten myself into". Trust me, it's better than it sounds.

Welcome aboard!

Hear! Hear!
XQC
Exquisite Corpse
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#6862630 Oct 18, 2012 at 01:20 PM
Guides
561 Posts
I downloaded your white paper, and had a chance to at least look at part of it, just time-bound today, too much work... :( I think that the statistic that it was 43% who did mobile learning in 2009 and 67% in 2012. Staggering. As a result of your post I am re-thinking how to reach my students through mobile.

Welcome to the Mooc.

#6846661 alexjr wrote:

Hi all,

I'm Alex Reeve - I work as a Blended Learning Consultant at a bespoke online learning company in the UK, www.brightwave.co.uk.

I've produced some game-based learning projects for clients and am looking to deepen my understanding of the field and hopefully get some great new ideas for GBL design. You can download a free guide I've written on GBL (featuring lots of great corporate & educational examples) here: http://www.brightwave.co.uk/practical-guides/game-based-learning-design. You can also read my blog here: alexreeve.com

Alex

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#6882057 Oct 22, 2012 at 09:00 PM
Guides
561 Posts
Thanks will re-check out that link, and I will check out shadowera.com. I have an acquaintance, actually I do some management of online customer support for them, that did one kickstarter and are planning a third, bring back a multi-player M.U.L.E. game from the old Atari, called Alphacolony.com if you want to check it out. Right now the Table Top game group are helping me by letting me video or do still photos and to also ask them questions about their personal involvement and what gaming does and I also ask how could an instructor use this in class.

#6848413 ThereseEllis wrote:

Tabletop games are awesome. As for creation of game - that's an incredible idea! Please share when you do. ^_^
Your idea makes me think of Shadow Era, a game I found through kickstarter: http://www.shadowera.com/
They have a free site if you want to just play and only charge for the physical cards!

Also, here's a re-link to the journal (in case anyone is interested) http://www.radicalteacher.org/

#6842966 grasshopper98 wrote:

That link wouldn't work for me, but I get the idea. Table Top games work and I do sponsor a Table Top games club at Front Range (BCC) we meet twice a week, a loose membership of 30+ with at least about 15 attending either on Tuesday or Thursday, D&D and MTG. We are getting other games to play, this is outside of class, but I am looking at building my own game (check out the slideshow -- right side of this page) there is a shot of "Decromancer" a program that will help you build a game similar to Magic the Gathering. I want to use it in my classes, but realize you have to have all the cards laid out and how they interact with the abilities before you build one. Slowed me down a bit. Maybe over the winter holiday break..

#6822926 ThereseEllis wrote:

Hello, ladies. Couldn't help but make a suggestion (partly because this concept is too radical!)
Tabletop games can work really well if access to technology/equipment is an issue. For instance, Francesco Crocco details an exercise which integrates modified monopoly in conjunction with a case study to facilitate discussion about capitalism in Radical Teacher (No. 91).

Here's a link to the journal, if you're interested: http://www.radicalteacher.org/recent.asp

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#6882090 Oct 22, 2012 at 09:11 PM
Guides
561 Posts
WoW, to coin a phase, after those credentials I am not sure how much you can learn from us but I expect we will learn a great deal from you. I am a Facebooker too, under Cherry Emerson. Ha, I seldom use Skype either, I do when talking a long time with one daughter because we are both working on customer support for an online game company (board games) and we need to coordinate to make sure we haven't missed anyone. I have played for a few hours on WoW using the game company's president's log on, I know him personally and he has a board game night every week for friends .. . I came over early to load my laptop and rather than go home and he let me play one of his MANY full level characters, didn't care if I killed any off, he has been playing since WoW was first populated. Where did you take your classes? I know it was online but were they credit through a university, or online and credit available or just MOOCs for continued learning? I have learned so much here as a facilitator, sometimes I feel like I am one chapter ahead of the "students" or else behind the curve, we have quite a large array of serious experts in this field. Glad to have you here.

#6855127 cosa wrote:

Hi, My name is Cosa. I have taken classes online for Game Strategies and Motivation as well as Gamification.

This is my third MOOC. I guess.

I have played World of Warcraft, blogged, use Learnist, and other social media devices. I am new to Twitter and Diigo. I may have used Flickr in the past.

I am a former media specialist, but now have two Master's Degrees, one is in Information Science, the other is from an online school in Education Design and Media Technology. With that degree, I have had multiple experiences with social media and Web 2.0 tools.

My quest? I wanted to see what this was all about and to see if I could learn anything from it.

I don't have a twitter handle but can be found at gmail and on Facebook. My name is Sandie Davidov in Second Life and sandiercolb in Skype (which I hardly use).

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#6884605 Oct 23, 2012 at 11:14 AM
Machinimist
6 Posts
Hello! I am late to the game, but will getting caught up by the weekend.

My name is Aaron Maurer and I am gifted education teacher for grades 4-8.

I also coach several sports and operate a First Lego League Robotics team

What is your Quest? or tell us why you have decided to join us in the exploration of games based learning?

My quest is to morph my classroom structure to a GBL model. I feel that my curriculum lends itself perfectly to creating a new game system each year and keeping things fresh.

Some things to include in your post are:
What level of Education are you thinking of using GBL for? Grades 4-8 for both gifted classes and enrichment studies.

What types of games are you thinking about using? Not sure yet, but I know I want to form a Minecraft club and hopefully WoW.

How much experience do you have in gaming? I am back in the swing of things in my limited free time after not playing games for a few years. WoW has taken over my life since I started a few months ago.

What are your expectations of GBL's affect on your students / clients? To make my classroom AMAZING!
Are you looking for collaborators?

Please also include your weapons of choice - weapons of mass social media.

Everything you need is right here - http://about.me/coffeechug

Let us know your twitter handle, your blog and any other SoMe that you would like to share.
Aaron Maurer
Bettendorf School District
ELP Facilitator
Co-Teacher of 4th and 5th Grade ELP
6,7,8 Grade ELP Extensions
Lego Robotics Coach
8th Grade Boys Basketball Coach
http://about.me/coffeechug
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#6885443 Oct 23, 2012 at 02:03 PM
Guides
111 Posts
Welcome, coffeechug!

...Man, now I feel like I need caffeine.

Lego League Robotics? That sounds really interesting, is that pretty much what it sounds like, building robots with Legos?

It sounds like you're really eager to put GBL to work in your classroom. That's good - we need more educators like you.

Again, welcome to the MOOC!
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6886083 Oct 23, 2012 at 04:20 PM
Consigliere
18 Posts
Lyrae the Insane, aka Cynthia Calongne, and my quest is to develop a game style and culture for learning in 3D immersive environments. I teach doctoral courses in virtual worlds and currently incorporate games within all of my classes, but do not have a pervasive theme or schedule of incentives that transforms learning into a switched on, incentive-riddled, game environment and culture.

Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal.
It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#6886369 Oct 23, 2012 at 05:27 PM
Initiate
26 Posts
My name is Jean Hewlett. In SecondLife, I'm Riven Homewood, and my main character in Cognitive Dissonance is Rivienne the Nightelf Druid. In real life, I'm a librarian for a private university in California. I work at a small branch campus that's located about 50 miles from the main campus. The students I serve are all what's known as "returning adult students" - adults who have decided to go back to school and finally get that college degree. Most of them are in their 30s, but we've had students as young as 20 and as old as 68. Most of them are working, often full time in very responsible jobs, and those who aren't working now are generally looking for work.

Libraries are complicated these days, and my library is no exception. It's almost totally online, including access to over 100 different databases of journal articles. I've long wished there was some good way to teach people how to use it, something better than having me stand in front of them and try to tell them everything about how to use the library in less than an hour. Library online tutorials exist, but they tend to be boring and often cryptic. University library research is essentially text-based, and that makes it hard to gamify.

I keep chasing the holy grail of somehow giving students the same kind of detective story thrill that I get when I do research. So far, I haven't found a way to reach them, other than sitting down with them one on one, but I keep hoping. Meanwhile, I run a community library on SecondLife and spend hours trying to level several different characters on World of Warcraft, all the while trying to analyze what makes these online worlds compelling and whether any of that can be transferred to library education.
Riven
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#6886461 Oct 23, 2012 at 05:50 PM
Envoy
45 Posts
Hello Riven,

Exceptionally glad that you are here! That thrill would you consider it engagement? And when you find the research - fiero? I'm currently working with microbiology professors where we are adapting the curriculum into epidemiology vignettes - so I am also on that search for that detective story thrill.
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#6886479 Oct 23, 2012 at 05:54 PM
Envoy
45 Posts
#6886083 Lyrlobo wrote:

Lyrae the Insane, aka Cynthia Calongne, and my quest is to develop a game style and culture for learning in 3D immersive environments. I teach doctoral courses in virtual worlds and currently incorporate games within all of my classes, but do not have a pervasive theme or schedule of incentives that transforms learning into a switched on, incentive-riddled, game environment and culture.

Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal.


I'd be very interested to know when you find it. When going over notes today, I really started to see where connectivist learning is very similar to how gamers learn. I do think a gaming culture looks at learning differently and would love to bring that into the classroom and into professional development for teachers.
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#6895132 Oct 25, 2012 at 03:56 PM · Edited 8 years ago
Guides
111 Posts
Hello Lyrae and Riven! We're glad to see you both here!

#6886083 Lyrlobo wrote:

Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal.



That's a challenging goal, I certainly wish you luck with that! "Non-gamer" is an interesting term, isn't it? "Non-smoker," for example, means someone who doesn't smoke, period. By this logic, a "non-gamer" never plays any games, ever. Even though they identify themselves as such, I am doubtful that too many peoplle are actually like that, it's just a matter of approaching them the right way. Just a thought I had!

Welcome to the MOOC! Enjoy your stay!
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6906579 Oct 28, 2012 at 12:15 PM
Guides
561 Posts
My subject matter isn't as easily pushed into gaming, when we are a commuter community college and we are in the west so to get around a car is useful, bus service is good but doesn't cover everything or days. So doing GPS hunts or many field trips are difficult (the paperwork for a field trip has a 30 day in advance requirement, which does eliminate something you happen to find will be going on in a week!). My problem is that I do teach to the competencies, but some students really want pushed, challenged above what I already do.

Here is my thought and I am open to suggestions (Anthropology, Cultural):

I am thinking about badges, that at the end of the semester you would receive a certificate showing "advanced proficiency in:" and and allow them to examine say, anthropological theories, and do a 2000 word essay comparing and contrasting three of these theories, for that you get NO points, NO grade, but if acceptable, would earn the badge. The certificate would have outlines for all say, six badges you could earn, and so potential employers or colleges (if going on to four year) would see what you earned as well as what you didn't decide to earn. Anyone think that would work?


#6886083 Lyrlobo wrote:

Lyrae the Insane, aka Cynthia Calongne, and my quest is to develop a game style and culture for learning in 3D immersive environments. I teach doctoral courses in virtual worlds and currently incorporate games within all of my classes, but do not have a pervasive theme or schedule of incentives that transforms learning into a switched on, incentive-riddled, game environment and culture.

Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal.

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#6933596 Nov 03, 2012 at 05:02 PM
Initiate
45 Posts
#6886369 rivenhomewood wrote:


Library online tutorials exist, but they tend to be boring and often cryptic. University library research is essentially text-based, and that makes it hard to gamify.

I keep chasing the holy grail of somehow giving students the same kind of detective story thrill that I get when I do research. So far, I haven't found a way to reach them, other than sitting down with them one on one, but I keep hoping.



Riven illustrates an excellent test for gamification: fluent library use by undergraduates as a clear outcome.

My olde-worlde thinking runs to the following recipe:
* Describe the desired outcome/s
* Come up with a set of achievements that contribute to these outcomes
* Produce a flowchart that structures these as steps towards success
* Create a programme of tutorials that "walks" students in the "right" direction.
* Evaluate the programme, adjust the content and repeat.

How can we make the process less "boring" and "cryptic"?
What gamification techniques can be employed in this context?
Would a guild structure be useful in this case?
What structure and objectives would a "new library users" guild have?
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6943430 Nov 05, 2012 at 10:05 PM
Guides
561 Posts
[quote_post6886479 user=765697
Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal. [/quote_post6886083]
I'd be very interested to know when you find it. When going over notes today, I really started to see where connectivist learning is very similar to how gamers learn. I do think a gaming culture looks at learning differently and would love to bring that into the classroom and into professional development for teachers.[/quote_post6886479]

You are correct they are starting to study the fact that playing these MMORPG games seems to be wiring our brains differently, can't remember where I read it but I bet someone is up-to-date on the research.
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#7034158 Nov 27, 2012 at 03:22 AM
Consigliere
18 Posts
#6798644 kae wrote:


What is your Quest?

Some things to include in your post are:

  • What level of Education are you thinking of using GBL for?
  • What types of games are you thinking about using?
  • How much experience do you have in gaming?
  • What are your expectations of GBL's affect on your students / clients?
  • Are you looking for collaborators?

Please also include your weapons of choice - weapons of mass social media.

Let us know your twitter handle, your blog and any other SoMe that you would like to share.



Hi, this is Lurker Lyr Lobo, aka Lyrae the Insane in WoW, and my quest is to one day see a repository of 3D immersive books that educators can load and visit, similar to stepping inside a holodeck. I want learning experiences that weave games, deep reflection, and stimulate the senses as well as our creativity.

I designed courses that applied gamification at the master's level about seven years ago and now am applying it at the doctoral level. Some of my games are simple, such as reverse quizzes where I pay $10 Linden dollars for the rapid fire answers that students provide during our brainstorming sessions, human barometer studies, scavanger and treasure hunts, mysteries and trivia games.

If Wizards of the Coast had not bought TSR and dumped their tracking system, I'd be beyond Paragon level (two levels above Grandmaster) at both judging/running games and role playing.

I've played at game conventions since 1988, played Dungeons and Dragons since the 70s, beta tested/played over 24 MMORPGs while writing test reports) and will play 3 Wow accounts simultaneously to do my own dungeons, a plus while completing the Insane in the Membrane achievement with Shandily and Elianya prior to Cataclysm.

Most doctoral students tend to be very serious and fearful, as high academic standards are required. I terrorize them by teaching in Second Life, using unusual activities and tools, and enhancing their digital literacy, personal power and voice.

I also teach strange subjects, such as Futuring and Innovation using think tank methods, and force them to forecast innovations for 15-20 years from now, and then to reflect on the forces that will support or impede their great ideas.

Games pull us out of ourselves and in them, we are larger than life, vibrant and powerful. We are in life, too, but often do not enjoy widespread recognition for our strengths nor wallow in money, power and accomplishments. *grins*

Collaborators? Always. Together, the energy is more exciting and the work is satisfying.

Barbara Truman, Francisca Yonekura, Andy Stricker and I are working on several research areas that may converge within Harmony Arts (a 501c3) and Andy Stricker's Virtual Harmony. Andy is the visionary behind our loosely-coupled band of collaborators and researchers.

New Harmony is the home of two Utopian societies upon which over 300 businesses and innovative technologies originated, including US Steel and Alcoa. While our goal is not focused on fame or fortune, we recognize these early pioneers who came together and made great things happen in their communal societies.

Today, our focus is on sustainability, remembering the things that we value and identifying that which is poignant and satisfying to the flame that lies deep within each of us.

These same qualities exist in a compelling game. *grins* Nice to meet you! *waves*

Cyn / Lyr Lobo

It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#7034167 Nov 27, 2012 at 03:28 AM
Consigliere
18 Posts
the MMORPGs effect on our brains may relate to the research by Constance Steinkuehler as presented in her keynote address http://archive.nmc.org/2010-nml-symposium/steinkuehler-keynote

Check out her statistics... http://web.nmc.org/files/2010-nml-symposium/constance-steinkuehler-slides.pdf

Her slides are a treat to be savored! *waves*
Lyr Lobo

#6943430 grasshopper98 wrote:

[quote_post6886479 user=765697
Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal. [/quote_post6886083]
I'd be very interested to know when you find it. When going over notes today, I really started to see where connectivist learning is very similar to how gamers learn. I do think a gaming culture looks at learning differently and would love to bring that into the classroom and into professional development for teachers.[/quote_post6886479]

You are correct they are starting to study the fact that playing these MMORPG games seems to be wiring our brains differently, can't remember where I read it but I bet someone is up-to-date on the research.

It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#7034177 Nov 27, 2012 at 03:35 AM
Consigliere
18 Posts
Very true! I re-read Steinkuehler's NMC Keynote and her doctoral research mirrored your thoughts.

Creation is the key. Gamers do not simply consume. Oh some play and put down a game without it transforming them, but the consummate gamer takes control of the environment, identifies new paths and techniques for mastery and is a scientist, exploring foreign terrain.

Creativity and how we transform our play experience are among the qualities that we want to leverage in games-based learning. I have some Stupid Fun Bucks from Will Wright's think tank and agree with him.

It is time for the Game of Life!

*waves*
Lyr

#6886479 Games MOOC wrote:

#6886083 Lyrlobo wrote:

Lyrae the Insane, aka Cynthia Calongne, and my quest is to develop a game style and culture for learning in 3D immersive environments. I teach doctoral courses in virtual worlds and currently incorporate games within all of my classes, but do not have a pervasive theme or schedule of incentives that transforms learning into a switched on, incentive-riddled, game environment and culture.

Leveraging games for non-gamers is a secondary goal.


I'd be very interested to know when you find it. When going over notes today, I really started to see where connectivist learning is very similar to how gamers learn. I do think a gaming culture looks at learning differently and would love to bring that into the classroom and into professional development for teachers.
It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#7071547 Dec 05, 2012 at 12:27 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Initiate
1 Post
I wanted to join the MOOC from the start, but my schedule for first trimester was way too crazy. So I figure although the synergy peak may have past, I can still learn a lot by going through the weeks on my own and starting conversations with whoever is still involved.
-What level of Education are you thinking of using GBL for?
I am an instructional coach for K-12 and would love to bring GBL to all of those levels.
-What types of games are you thinking about using?
Virtual Environments, Table Top/Card games, Game Creation (such as Scratch and Agentsheets), LARP (I like to get kids up and moving as well as engaging digitally.)
-How much experience do you have in gaming?
Lifelong gamer and game designer.
-What are your expectations of GBL's affect on your students / clients?
I would like to see student self direction climb and engagement become genuine. I feel that I am a student of GBL. I learned about the 1920s in order to run my first Call of Cthulhu game. I was inspired to research WWII by playing Axis and Allies. I wanted realistic science fiction in my Cyberpunk game that wasn't just "future magic" so I was inspired to study science and technology. Atop all this I was writing, and writing, and writing some more. So what are my expectations... I want to give today's students what I had and then some.
-Are you looking for collaborators?
Absolutely, and I noticed a lot of Colorado folks in here too. I would love to visit anyone and lend a hand in the classroom for a 1st hand view of how different implementations are going.
Corey Papastathis
Instructional Coach of Technology
Boulder Colorado
WoW - Darkbeard <Cognitive Dissonance>
Twitter - @TechCoachScribe
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