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#6942499 Nov 05, 2012 at 05:33 PM
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As BYOD becomes more and more popular, is it an easy way around IT requirements for games in computer labs?
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#6943403 Nov 05, 2012 at 09:54 PM
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“bring your own device” (BYOD) is big in business, for example this IBM Mobile Enterprises page points out that a consumer spends 21% more if shopping from a tablet/phone than from a computer, IBM on BYOD

One problem is that all students don't have full internet access on their devices, even when teachers/professors use it, they say they have to put people in groups of 3-4 to accommodate those without. I don't like any system that makes someone feel "not as good" as another, and I fear that.

For me to really use it I would want a grant that would give all my students top of the line galaxy tabs for example and we could utilize them and they could keep them, (I would want the grant to pay their basic galaxy fees for two years, by then the technology is so old you can tie those tablets together for a reasonably good boat anchor.) Then we could go to museums, we could walk malls looking for things from other countries in shops, or hand made, or whatever and also keep in instant communication. I would come up with some project for sure. One would be how much they communicated after the class was over, and then a one year, 18 mo and 2 year and 2.5 year follow up to see what changes it had made and how they had used it, and had they used it in other classes as well... and duh, if they still had it... at all.

The reason I mention this is a University (which shall be nameless) had a program to bring junior high or sophomore students with Native American background into the STEM area and have them be there two weeks in dorms, get use to college (in the summer) and build a good working computer, and load the software, they got to take it home and could keep it as long as their science grades were a C or better, and then in two years they would give it back and perhaps build a new one. I knew a participant, had a great time, but then no one checked grades, heads of programs changed, no one ever asked about the computer and about four years later it was obsolete and disposed of. FOLLOW UP IS SO IMPORTANT. You can't just study fish in a bowl, you have to tag them and send them downstream with their little monitors..... to learn anything.
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#6943652 Nov 05, 2012 at 11:53 PM
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Instead of constantly saying to my students "put that mobile phone away!" I'd like to be saying "make sure your phones are switched ON!"

I'm not very connected, but I have a video of how Samsung sees themselves driving digital convergence with their devices. Warning: advertorial!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEAUQCf-OqU (5 minutes)

Extrapolating this into the classroom, BYOD would mean bringing your own goodies with material already loaded to the cloud. The class would go on, perhaps with a few spare devices for kids who don't have the means to afford gizmos.

And, just for laughs, here is the world we're training kids for:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK_cdkpazjI

(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6946829 Nov 06, 2012 at 03:12 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
I've already seen discussions of BYOD in schools. Recently, I participated in an email discussion talking about how to get around IT in order to bring WoW into a school computer lab for a course. The discussion centered around how installing onto USB drives would work and what the computer requirements would be.

I teach in a Mac lab and I have, many times, had students download a program to experiment with open source alternatives to the programs that they're learning, simply so they have something with which to compare the industry standard (e.g. GIMP to compare with Photoshop).

My preference, in computer labs, is for students to primarily use a USB drive to BYOS (Bring your own software). This is because, in my classroom, students always have access to a top-level computer. I know that's not always an option. I've always loved the idea, though. I carry a USB drive with Portable Apps on it so that I can use Portable GIMP or Portable OpenOffice whenever I need to. http://portableapps.com.

@Grasshopper - Yours is not an uncommon concern, actually. However, I found an interesting rebuttal to it in an article written around a year ago about common myths to BYOD: http://thejournal.com/articles/2011/11/09/7-byod-myths.aspx. Essentially, the author argues that students who are "have-nots" will have greater access to school technology if other students bring their own technology. I thought it was an interesting viewpoint.

I went digging around online for articles related to BYOD that give some practical advice or tips. As with many things we grapple with in this MOOC, I mostly found polarized articles about mobile devices in the classroom. However, I did find an article that discusses mobile-driven learning activities in a K-12 classroom setting. http://usergeneratededucation.wordpress.com/2012/06/04/mobile-learning-and-the-flipped-classroom-the-full-picture/.

-LeeDale
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#6947237 Nov 06, 2012 at 04:44 PM
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My concern as someone who doesn't have much money is that I can't afford to buy a "cell phone" (which is really more of a pocket computer in this case) so my options in participating is such an environment might be limited. Assuming the education system in question isn't just going to give me a phone and a plan for free, I'd have to share with one of the "haves" or maybe there would be some classroom models (which isn't really BYOD anymore.)

I certainly don't mind it being an option, but having it be a requirement would be a problem.

It COULD be a workaround for IT problems in some cases, but some problems are network based. For example, my campus blocked access to Steam last time I checked. If the IT department is unwilling to let such things be accessed through their network, it's still an issue.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6947918 Nov 06, 2012 at 07:52 PM
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Hawkeye, that is my exact concern as well. I teach at a relatively wealthy school, and most of my students have access to these devices -- but that just makes it harder for those who don't. Also, since I teach grade 6, a lot of my students are at that place where their parents aren't QUITE ready for them to have mobile phones yet. On the other hand, some have them "for emergency use" and others have them just because they have them.

It's an interesting level to teach at because of that dynamic. I suspect that if I was teaching grade 9, for example, pretty much everyone would have a cell phone. I mentor a girl from a family without much money, and all three kids in that family have iphones. I'm not sure how, but it was a priority for them. And as one parent pointed out last year, if you don't let your kid have a mobile phone by a certain age, you're basically cutting off their social life.
Don’t do work that just exists within your classroom... do work that changes the world. -Will Richardson

http://www.gamifymyclass.blogspot.ca
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#6948193 Nov 06, 2012 at 09:36 PM
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#6947918 missrithenay wrote:

Hawkeye, that is my exact concern as well. I teach at a relatively wealthy school, and most of my students have access to these devices -- but that just makes it harder for those who don't...I mentor a girl from a family without much money, and all three kids in that family have iphones. I'm not sure how, but it was a priority for them. And as one parent pointed out last year, if you don't let your kid have a mobile phone by a certain age, you're basically cutting off their social life.



Three kids with iPhones? Even assuming mobile phones are "essential", there are non-iPhone options that would cost far less. I know this sounds cynical, but is that particular family really in financial difficulty?

(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6948382 Nov 06, 2012 at 10:48 PM
Guild Officer
73 Posts
Awesome. Singularity?

#6943652 Michael Barry wrote:

Instead of constantly saying to my students "put that mobile phone away!" I'd like to be saying "make sure your phones are switched ON!"

I'm not very connected, but I have a video of how Samsung sees themselves driving digital convergence with their devices. Warning: advertorial!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEAUQCf-OqU (5 minutes)

Extrapolating this into the classroom, BYOD would mean bringing your own goodies with material already loaded to the cloud. The class would go on, perhaps with a few spare devices for kids who don't have the means to afford gizmos.

And, just for laughs, here is the world we're training kids for:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lK_cdkpazjI

Games Based Learning Mooc (gamesMOOC)
FRCC Humanities Instructor
The best combination of technophile and luddite

Twitter @ThereseEllis
Google+ therese.catherine.ellis@gmail.com
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#6948394 Nov 06, 2012 at 10:56 PM · Edited 9 years ago
Guild Officer
73 Posts
Agreed. One of the charter schools I teach dual credit at has consistent internet issues. So, while phone use would help, the students are from working class families and many can't afford them.

#6947237 Hawkye wrote:

My concern as someone who doesn't have much money is that I can't afford to buy a "cell phone" (which is really more of a pocket computer in this case) so my options in participating is such an environment might be limited. Assuming the education system in question isn't just going to give me a phone and a plan for free, I'd have to share with one of the "haves" or maybe there would be some classroom models (which isn't really BYOD anymore.)

I certainly don't mind it being an option, but having it be a requirement would be a problem.

It COULD be a workaround for IT problems in some cases, but some problems are network based. For example, my campus blocked access to Steam last time I checked. If the IT department is unwilling to let such things be accessed through their network, it's still an issue.

Games Based Learning Mooc (gamesMOOC)
FRCC Humanities Instructor
The best combination of technophile and luddite

Twitter @ThereseEllis
Google+ therese.catherine.ellis@gmail.com
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#6948475 Nov 06, 2012 at 11:42 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
Here's my reality: Every time I bring up the term, BYOD, I get "shut down" by administrators (in terms of allowing teachers to BYOD).

I am totally for asking students to use their mobile devices in the classroom. As to the concerns of ThereseEllis and missrithenay, I believe that there are some places (such as Cricket) that offers free mobile devices with a monthly plan, though the monthly plan itself may still be too expensive for some students.

If anyone has checked the prices of laptops lately, you'll notice how low the prices of laptops have dropped. I believe that mobile devices are getting increasingly cheaper as the mobile market becomes even more competitive. After all, Apple plans to release a smaller version of iPad Mini, or iPad Mini Mini (rumor has it that the iPad Mini Mini will be priced around $99??) to compete with the likes of Google Nexus 7 ($199) and Kindle Fire ($159). If the price of tablets are dropping like flies, it would not be long before mobile phones would be equally cheap or cheaper in the very near future; inexpensive technology is an inevitability. Wait, aren't Google Glasses supposed to replace ALL mobile technology? Give me a pair, Google.

This is why we need to pay close attention to how mobile computing is affecting education. I've been a big advocate of letting students learn using their mobile phones (when wifi, 3G, 4G, whatever G is actually functioning at our schools). As the demand for connectivity rises, IT will have to provide more wifi access; we can already see this happening in many colleges that are renovating buildings with new technology.

Is it horrible that I already ask my students to use mobile phones in class on a daily basis? (Shhhh...) They use their devices to check for definitions on M-W.com, research for new information using Google Docs Research Function, curate news articles on Flipboard, type notes and take photos of school locations using Evernote, brainstorm using Fetchnotes, save bookmarks using Power Note (Diigo's android app name), play "tag-team" games, check geolocation using Google Maps and 4 Square, tweet on Twitter, check twittaround for more tweets for rhetorical analysis, call each other. <-- ok, this one's a joke

I'm especially excited about that MineCraft Pocket Edition (yay for $6.99)! I totally want to try out the pocket edition for the next semester. Just don't tell IT yet. :P

Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Twitter @autnes
http://bit.ly/sherryjones
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
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#6951056 Nov 07, 2012 at 02:08 PM
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Three kids with iPhones? Even assuming mobile phones are "essential", there are non-iPhone options that would cost far less. I know this sounds cynical, but is that particular family really in financial difficulty?


I don't disagree with you. I'm not saying they made the right call. I just know they prioritized iphones over, say, healthy food.
Don’t do work that just exists within your classroom... do work that changes the world. -Will Richardson

http://www.gamifymyclass.blogspot.ca
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#6951444 Nov 07, 2012 at 03:38 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
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Google Glasses? I'm getting...Virtual Boy vibes from that concept. And yes, you guessed it, it gives me the jibblies.

What I've gathered inside my little brain about BYOD is the following concise statement: we're not quite there yet. If we're (and this is the "medical we") even thinking about prioritizing iPhones over food...well...I think we need to re-think our priorities. That said, it might be more realistic to use in higher education than K-12. For example, if one of my teachers said "Okay, instead of buying a textbook for $120, go buy an iPad MiniNanoPico for $99," that would make a degree of sense, especially since you would much more realistically continue to use an iPad outside of class.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6954263 Nov 08, 2012 at 09:02 AM
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#6951444 Hawkye wrote:

Google Glasses? I'm getting...Virtual Boy vibes from that concept. And yes, you guessed it, it gives me the jibblies.

What I've gathered inside my little brain about BYOD is the following concise statement: we're not quite there yet. If we're (and this is the "medical we") even thinking about prioritizing iPhones over food...well...I think we need to re-think our priorities. That said, it might be more realistic to use in higher education than K-12. For example, if one of my teachers said "Okay, instead of buying a textbook for $120, go buy an iPad MiniNanoPico for $99," that would make a degree of sense, especially since you would much more realistically continue to use an iPad outside of class.



I thnk that you and I lean more to how can we proved access to all. It is a matter of money. I expect in some high-end private colleges, a requirement may be to have a "hand held" device like an iPad or Tablet, the same way we used to say that you needed to have a hand-held calculator. I remember back in the late 1970s having to have a "hand held calculator" (that you can buy now for maybe $4.99) and having to rent one at $30 a month. I can see buying a "tablet" through the bookstore with online text book access built into the class would be a possibility with wifi access, there is free wifi everywhere any more.

As prices go down... our availability to offer options like this to online goes up, but alas, so does the technology that is ahead of what is now cheaper and that remains expensive. Colleges like ours, a community college, with working and commuting students with real lives, families, jobs, etc., will economically always be behind the curve.

Alexander Dawson (private K-12 school here in Colorado) gave all of several year's students free iPads, but the tuition is $20K a year.
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#6955914 Nov 08, 2012 at 03:44 PM · Edited over 7 years ago
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I think you're right that I'm mostly concerned that no one is left behind. I've been there, and it's not a fun place to be. If you can afford $20,000 a year for school, odds are you don't struggle with the same things those of us in community college do. As much fun as it is to think "what if we had unlimited funds," I think most of us have to work with a somewhat more realistic budget. My opinion is that it's more important to work towards improving education for everyone, not just those who are financially priviliged.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6957321 Nov 08, 2012 at 11:01 PM
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Well, I just read all this and I reckon I will throw in my bit. I'm in a large district that is presently piloting BYOD at 25+ elem, middle, and high schools in the district. Mostly they are testing out the infrastructure and seeing how the access points hold up with all the added technology. We presently have wifi at my school and we have 100+ ipads running off it. We have heard they are going to unlock the wifi for teachers to go BYOD at our school soon. Keep in mind, districts have to have student filtering on the wifi, so you cannot access facebook, twitter, you tube, yahoo mail or gmail from a mobile device. This is in our district so I'm sure other districts are different. In elementary schools you don't see kids bringing in tablets, however, I hear there are a lot of iPod Touches out there. I presently don't have issues with the wifi access when I am teaching in the Lily Pad and have 30 iPads dinging the access point at once. Keep in mind, not all apps require internet access, quite a few of the games my kids play are played offline on the iPad. In fact, Order and Chaos (MMORPG) is the only game on my iPad that requires wifi. And honestly if you think about it, if we can direct their attention to how useful Twitter, Zite, and other news aggregators can be and how it's not just mindless social roaming, well then I more than believe that mobile devices will prove their worth. As far as cost goes...with Kindle Fires coming in way under 200$, the growing popularity of Android based systems, and more and more being written for Android that is going to bring mobile learning more into reach. And honestly if you give the students some time on Minecraft, Zio Ball, Zentominos, Oregon Trail, their engagement level is so high that you can get the other "work" out of them. I even got the 2nd graders working on blogs today, I may have only gotten one sentence but I did get them logged into Kidblog. LOL

And BTW if you didn't already know...I am all for games in school.

I have discovered that our district is not going to allow the download of the Steam Client to allow playing of Portal 2. When our IT geeks downloaded it they were able to access their regular steam accounts...not gonna happen at school. And there is no way I can play WoW with the elementary set. Perhaps start a Wow afterschool club at a middle school??? Wonder if they would let me do that? But first I have to get Minecraft to be a RAGING success.

~Neemana
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#6959835 Nov 09, 2012 at 01:44 PM
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#6957321 Neemana wrote:

Well, I just read all this and I reckon I will throw in my bit. I'm in a large district that is presently piloting BYOD at 25+ elem, middle, and high schools in the district. Mostly they are testing out the infrastructure and seeing how the access points hold up with all the added technology. We presently have wifi at my school and we have 100+ ipads running off it. We have heard they are going to unlock the wifi for teachers to go BYOD at our school soon. Keep in mind, districts have to have student filtering on the wifi, so you cannot access facebook, twitter, you tube, yahoo mail or gmail from a mobile device. This is in our district so I'm sure other districts are different. In elementary schools you don't see kids bringing in tablets, however, I hear there are a lot of iPod Touches out there. I presently don't have issues with the wifi access when I am teaching in the Lily Pad and have 30 iPads dinging the access point at once. Keep in mind, not all apps require internet access, quite a few of the games my kids play are played offline on the iPad.



We are having similar problems with WoW and our computer.

What is the census data $$$ income for your district? There is no way right now a community college can afford iPads, etc., for their students. Do you think that there is more money available in K-12 than in say, a community college? If so, why, and what is the solution for us?
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#6964593 Nov 10, 2012 at 06:26 PM
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BYOD helps with the problem of schools purchasing soon-obsolete technology. I'm reminded of 2004 or 2005 when there was a push to get Australian schools and students buying graphics calculators.

One school even required students to purchase them, with teeny folding keyboards, incorporated them into classes etc etc etc. so students were taking notes on graphics calculators in humanities subjects...

Education systems are a soft touch for snake oil salesmen. What was telling was the fact that little or no new gear was made available during this push -- the marketing was all surrounding existing products, unlike "genuine" marketing initiatives (I know, what a tautology) in which new hardware or software are released for a specific purpose.

I once asked my son what he does when the slides in the school playground were wet. He replied: "I let a dumb kid go down first."

It appeared to me that the manufacturers (Hewlitt Packard, Sharp, Texas Instruments) were dumping their soon-obsolete devices in the "dumb" countries of the world.

Soon after these things were made useless by the march of technology -- no connectivity to wireless or internet, for example, aside from the fact that students resented the clunky devices that couldn't do half the things their mobile phones did, and were virtually incapable of playing games.

Equity of access issues are twofold. "Hard" equity, or access equality, is nearly unachievable. A school wealthy enough to provide uniform access to devices (all students have iPads, for example) is unlikely to be equitable, having already filtered out students in need. "Soft" equity, however, seems feasible -- BYOD with broadly-accessible portal or portals leaves the problem of the device to the student. The school might then target provision of devices to those demonstrably in need.

The British Royal Society (and others) have released a workshop report "Human Enhancement and the Future of Work" http://royalsociety.org/policy/projects/human-enhancement/
Some key points:
■Enhancement technologies could change how people work.
■Empirical data are needed to guide policy.
■Policy must be informed by open dialogue.
■The cost of technologies will be crucial.
■The availability of enhancements will be influential.
...digital devices and services with the potential to influence cognition are emerging continuously with little research into the risks and benefits.
■Interdisciplinary approaches will be key to moving forward.
...if any enhancement is seen as valuable, scientists need to work together with social scientists, philosophers, ethicists, policy-makers and the public to discuss the ethical and moral consequences of enhancement, and thus to harness maximum benefit with minimal harm.

edited from http://royalsociety.org/policy/projects/human-enhancement/workshop-report/

The full report can be found at http://royalsociety.org/uploadedFiles/Royal_Society_Content/policy/projects/human-enhancement/2012-11-06-Human-enhancement.pdf
Games are specifically mentioned under "Cognitive Training":
Video games may be good tools for cognitive training because they are so engaging. In fact, they can be addictive, triggering similar neuronal networks to those stimulated in drug and gambling addicts.52 It is this property that may make them useful because the brain’s dopaminergic reward system, which is stimulated by these games, is implicated in plasticity and thus in learning. Studies in neuroscience are beginning to explore the plasticity involved in the transfer of trained abilities to real-world tasks, as well as revealing how different training strategies (e.g. focusing on individual elements of a task or a whole task in general) might impact on learning.53,54 For example, games could be designed so that the reward element is maximised to increase the likelihood of effective learning. Video games could also offer promise in cognitive maintenance. Research in patients with Alzheimer’s disease indicates that brain training games might be more effective than traditional psychostimulation methods in reducing both cognitive decline and depressive symptoms.55
This interdisciplinary approach has the potential to lead to better incorporation of video game processes with learning and training processes.


Some useful current references are in the paper, especially from neuroscience of games.
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6964918 Nov 10, 2012 at 08:20 PM
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My drunkard's walk through the literature has led me to early childhood articles. I know, I know, I've reached my own level.

Bear with me, though: the links I've chosen have wider educational application.

12 Best Practices For Moving Young Learners Forward With Technologyhttp://thejournal.com/articles/2012/11/07/early-learning-and-technology.aspx

An article addressing tech in education for much younger learners. However, its suggestions for selecting and purchasing technology for use in learning are broadly applicable and very practical.

Gail Lovely's 5 Favorite Free Web Apps for Education
http://thejournal.com/Articles/2012/04/23/Gail-Lovelys-5-Favorite-Free-Web-Tools.aspx
Again, the article concerns very young children. However, for the technically challenged like myself, and for learners with a broad range of abilities, these web apps are flexible, simple to use, and basic functionality generally requires no logon (avoids many privacy issues and firewall problems):
Picmonkey http://www.picmonkey.com/ -- online photo editing/sharing
Stixy http://stixy.com/ --for online "sticky notes"
Tagxedo http://www.tagxedo.com/ -- a Wordle substitute that also: allows the "word cloud" to conform to any shape (the illustration shows a cloud the shape of the USA, for example), built in printing, saving and sharing functionality.
Titanpad http://titanpad.com/ -- for online collaborative writing. Can be an instant-use public pad, or with free account allows password protect, saving, revert versions, chat etc.
Pearltrees http://www.pearltrees.com -- similar to Pinterest but in a visual and intuitive "mind mapping" format.

Yes, this week I am a Gail Lovely groupie. This interview I found to be an enlightening look at what technologies very young children are currently using -- this might give me some insight into my own students of 2022!
http://thejournal.com/Articles/2011/01/19/From-Toys-to-Learning-Tools-5-Questions-with-Gail-Lovely.aspx
She makes some interesting points about developing kids' technology use from "toys" to "tools" and about appropriate selection of learning technologies.
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6965127 Nov 10, 2012 at 09:38 PM
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187 Posts
I've actually used a form of TitanPad in my web design course. I created 4 HTML documents with errors and grouped students to weed out the errors in each in order to improve their troubleshooting skills. It worked very nicely and, because students could see notes from others and the code as it was fixed, they saw others' process.

Many of my students start from a very basic knowledge of computers and software, so these kinds of web apps can be a real help in easing them into basic computer literacy.

I know that BYOD is a big movement in education right now, but I like the idea of moving towards hardware-agnostic software (i.e. web apps), so that students have easy access to them at home. Even at the college level (community college in my case) cost is always a factor.

That picmonkey editor is pretty respectable, actually. It reminds me of another one of my favorite web apps that's intended for photo editing: pixlr.com. I actually use it in class, after students no longer have access to Photoshop due to their trial running out.

I'm a strong proponent of open source software and web apps, so I really appreciate you sharing these!

-LeeDale
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#6965234 Nov 10, 2012 at 10:22 PM
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FINALLY, one for Anthropology, since my classes are in computer rooms, I have no problem with real time access to internet on PCs, but this would be an interesting game for BYOD I may ask as many students to download the free app on the first day and then when we get to race and ethnicity have them share the app with maybe a couple of other students, however? Our glitch? Almost NO bars on our cell phones within our classroom building, we are in the dead zone of the world, AT&T get better than T-Mobile, but still really not workable in our classroom.

Check it out, and what is your opinion of it?

FREE iPad/iPhone/iPod APP "Guess My Race."
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