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#6942505 Nov 05, 2012 at 05:35 PM
Guild Officer
343 Posts
So in a job interview have you ever been asked what is your favorite mobile game or app?

What would you answer? What wouldn't you tell them about?
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#6943254 Nov 05, 2012 at 09:03 PM
Bard
20 Posts
I sparingly admit I am addicted to Plants Vs Zombies -- it's therapeutic in that it both relaxes one's mind while keeping it busy with strategy planning & problem solving. -- cheaper than a massage therapist and psychoanalysis, and ten times as mobile...
:0
XQC
Exquisite Corpse
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#6943293 Nov 05, 2012 at 09:15 PM · Edited 9 years ago
Guides
561 Posts
I have never been asked that in an interview. I have been asked what kind of a cell phone I have. (obviously I could see his, mine was in my car, so I answered that I had the same one he had, he seemed pleased). I have also been asked when applying for a high tech startup position, if I would take out the trash as I left as they didn't have cleaning service yet (I would have been the third person hired), I said, sure, and got the job. All the other candidates said, "Can't it wait?" They wanted someone who was willing to do ANY job that it took to build that company. In a year we were at 180 employees.

Today I would probably say Angry Birds, it is an easy answer and safe, or Tetris but in reality I like the Magic the Gathering iPad app. . . fantastic graphics, and of course there is Bejeweled Blitz. Angry birds is senseless fun and doesn't require you to really think too much, just calculate the speed and distance... Tetris I use a lot to help me focus and orientate. Magic The Gathering is competitive and challenging and with random distribution of cards, lucky... It also allows you to open up levels and "get stuff" That is a problem with Bejeweled Blitz, I can't see the point of getting to the max level for any one score, there seems to be no "badge" or reward, but you have to keep "buying points to compete the level" Frustrating so I don't. I also play WSOP Texas Hold'em, (not for money) and enjoy the tournament play. For me, Machiavellian that I am, admittedly, it would depend on who was asking me and what job I was applying to get...
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#6946872 Nov 06, 2012 at 03:23 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
One of my favorite mobile games is a ridiculous teeny little MMORPG called Legends. I die in it a lot and it's very lightweight. I love seeing everyone else running around blasting monsters, though.

Another, obviously, is Minecraft. It's very limited compared to the PC version but it's still pretty fun. I made a review of this game recently on YouTube:
http://youtu.be/5MZlRDM-YUE

My current favorite app in general on my iPad is Pinnacle Studio. It was about $8 and it is a pretty darn awesome video editor, of all things. I can trim video, transition from one video to the next, add titles, and record a voiceover. See my Minecraft video in the previous paragraph? I edited that on the iPad. (I had to capture the video on my Mac using AirPlay, but then I copied it back to the iPad for editing.) Just to give you the right perspective on this...I own Adobe Premiere and After Effects and I know how to use them.

I have several other favorites, but I suspect I should hush now and let someone else talk!
-LeeDale
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#6947105 Nov 06, 2012 at 04:14 PM
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111 Posts
I've never been asked that in an interview, but my favorite mobile game device would probably have to be the Game Boy. Released in 1989, this hand-held device sported a dot matrix screen and stereo sound. The outer casing was made out of Nintendium, rendering the device almost impervious to damage. (The last known amount of this substance was used up to create the final line of Gamecubes.)

In all seriousness, I've never owned a cell phone, so I couldn't really say which mobile game I'd like best. I really enjoy Plants vs. Zombies on my PC, though, so I'd wager I'd enjoy it a lot on a mobile device as well.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
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#6948379 Nov 06, 2012 at 10:47 PM
Guild Officer
73 Posts
Tetris was my first favorite and, more recently, I've been playing plants v. zombies and angry birds, too.
Games Based Learning Mooc (gamesMOOC)
FRCC Humanities Instructor
The best combination of technophile and luddite

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#6963251 Nov 10, 2012 at 11:14 AM
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561 Posts
#6948379 ThereseEllis wrote:

Tetris was my first favorite and, more recently, I've been playing plants v. zombies and angry birds, too.



I accidentally "cured myself with Tetris," let me explain, and this talks about how games re-wire our brains. . . I was in a car accident in 1990 (rear ended at about 80 MPH, I was going about 55 speed limit, slow lane... ) and I really had what I would call a closed head injury, just difficulty making all those connections to my Anthropology Theory for example. I started thinking I need to think in shapes and connections, so I started playing Tetris, and I also started to recover and make new pathways to old information easier. I finally got into a program that was recovery from surgery (back surgery-accident related) and one of the things they used to help people recover was TETRIS. Already had done that.

I played Angry Birds a lot when it first came out, I like the Seasonal one, didn't like the RIO one. Mostly I like looking for the "easter eggs" the hidden fun things that let you do something else. I even have paid good real money to get some instructions on where ones were that I couldn't fine.

I also play Texas Hold'em in real life (free games or small a few friends weekly game - tournament style) and use the WSOP App on my iPad. There were levels, different casinos, and finally the "WSOP (World Series of Poker) but it took a lot of hard earned virtual chips to enter. Finally I was brave enough to enter, won the first time, got millions of chips, and then lost interest in the game even if it opened up a different level. The Fiero of the game was lost, no risk, no challenge, I have millions of chips, no challenge really to earn more although I am in the big second level. It all just became a moot point. They failed to continue to engage me in the game.

Another is Bejeweled Blitz, I play for fun, but you can buy more points or "slot machine points" pulls, I realized there is nothing in the game that tells you what happens if you pay to get all these points and finish all the levels, there may be single game Fiero, high points and all that, but I am not wasting my time and money to get to the next level when they haven't articulated what my reward would be. They are also failing to continuously engage me in the game by not "posting" future rewards.

I also play Magic the Gathering on the iPad. It is basically the same as playing on a PC as both are online versions. They are more expensive that most of the games.

A friend developed a cute and annoying word game app for the iPad called "ICE CUBES" and there are about eight different levels, games, at .99 each. I have played about eight of them over six months, you can clear them and play them again free.

The other company I work for managing their online customer support, has put Hearts, Spades, Cribbage and other games they have onto iPad and Android (dreamquestgames.com) but they are having problems with the delivery of the add-ons, and if they find a bug, it takes two to three weeks, for Apple especially, to review and make available the update. That turn around time is frustration. If it were just our online game for PC and there was a bug we could fix it in ten minutes. Actually those PC games are solid and as they say in the industry "robust." There is no online multiple player option. I obviously have all the games free because I not only need to know the download/codes/etc., I need to know all the options, settings and rules of play for all our games.

One interesting trend in those APPS is giving the game FREE, but if you don't want to see ads, you pay for another add on app, to stop it, or if you want more characters or options, you pay for an add on, that is where the money really is, it is in the ADD ons. The re-engagment.
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#6964246 Nov 10, 2012 at 04:25 PM
Initiate
45 Posts
#6963251 grasshopper98 wrote:


I played Angry Birds a lot when it first came out, I like the Seasonal one, didn't like the RIO one. Mostly I like looking for the "easter eggs" the hidden fun things that let you do something else. I even have paid good real money to get some instructions on where ones were that I couldn't fine.

I also play Texas Hold'em ...won the first time, got millions of chips, and then lost interest in the game even if it opened up a different level. The Fiero of the game was lost, no risk, no challenge, I have millions of chips, no challenge really to earn more although I am in the big second level. It all just became a moot point. They failed to continue to engage me in the game.

Another is Bejeweled Blitz...They are also failing to continuously engage me in the game by not "posting" future rewards.
...
One interesting trend in those APPS is giving the game FREE, but if you don't want to see ads, you pay for another add on app, to stop it, or if you want more characters or options, you pay for an add on, that is where the money really is, it is in the ADD ons. The re-engagment.



If you used the term "gaming" in this country, it would be assumed you meant gambling. When a teacher friend and I advertised our high school's "Gaming and Modelling Club" we had two unintended consequences: parent calls to the Principal demanding to know why the school promoted gambling, and a couple of skinny doe-eyed girls wanting to know how to enter the fashion industry.

Gambling and (electronic) games both have an addictive component by deliberate design.

I enjoyed Bejeweled about a year ago. The lack of a later reward didn't really influence me. For me the small continuous reinforcement is key to its success and addictiveness.

I was struck by the similarity of Bejeweled to poker machines -- bright lights, tinkly noises, constant little rewards distracting you from the fact you are losing hours of your life (and in the sake of poker machines, considerable cash).

The big money certainly is in the extras. Pay-for-no-adverts is basically "pay to stop punishment" -- problem is, another way to stop reading the adverts is to stop playing the game.

I've loved games all my life, but I acknowledge that tapping into the reward centre of the brain is fraught with dangers. "Re-engagement" is very effectively achieved through the mechanism of addiction.

Can we expect the dark side of gamification to invade other areas of our lives?
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6964867 Nov 10, 2012 at 07:57 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#6964246 Michael Barry wrote:

[quote_post6963251 user=768203]
If you used the term "gaming" in this country, it would be assumed you meant gambling. When a teacher friend and I advertised our high school's "Gaming and Modelling Club" we had two unintended consequences: parent calls to the Principal demanding to know why the school promoted gambling, and a couple of skinny doe-eyed girls wanting to know how to enter the fashion industry.

I've loved games all my life, but I acknowledge that tapping into the reward centre of the brain is fraught with dangers. "Re-engagement" is very effectively achieved through the mechanism of addiction.

Can we expect the dark side of gamification to invade other areas of our lives?



Well my club is the "table top games" and apparently no one but us knows we are talking about Dungeons & Dragons and Magic the Gathering (among others, although some dragged out their old Pokemon cards for a session).

You are correct that is basically pay to avoid punishment with the add-ons.

I think that there is a down consequence of the re-engagement and in real life it already here. Starbucks, Nike, all re-engage us by advertising that we are part of their family, their users group.

Well, my son who is in his 40s just admitted his count on zombie kills (it keeps track, (Plants v. Zombies) is over 30,000. . . . he says it is a mindless game.
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