Notify Message
Forums
Page 1
Search
#6942516 Nov 05, 2012 at 05:36 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guild Officer
343 Posts
None of these are free apps - so if you already have them or know someone who is playing them, please give us a review.

Creatorverse

Minecraft Pocket Edition

Plants v. Zombies
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



+1
#6943314 Nov 05, 2012 at 09:21 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#6942516 kae wrote:

None of these are free apps - so if you already have them or know someone who is playing them, please give us a review.

Creatorverse

Minecraft Pocket Edition

Plants v. Zombies



I am off to get them now, my granddaughter has Plants v Zombies, and she said it is fun but gets boring. Minecraft I already have some Minecraft downloaded since is it my "specialty" in this mooc, and creatorverse I only heard of today in the great live feed you did this morning. Sorry I had to comment late, had to take down the altar at the museum for Day of the Dead.
+0
#6945280 Nov 06, 2012 at 10:00 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
Hi folks!

Here's my video review of Minecraft on the iPad:
http://www.youtube.com/user/leedaleshepherd1

Best,
-LeeDale
+1
#6951551 Nov 07, 2012 at 04:01 PM
Guides
111 Posts
I own Plants vs. Zombies for the PC, but I can't imagine it being TOO terribly different, especially since I saw a video of mobile gameplay.

Plants vs. Zombies is a "tower defense" game where you are trying to defend your base (your house) from an oncoming horde of enemies (the zombies.) You start with a fairly meager array of defenses - Sunflowers, which give you Sun (the "currency" needed to buy plants) and Peashooters, which shoot a standard projectile straight ahead. Over the course of the game, your array of plants becomes huge, allowing anything from a plant that fires down three lanes at once to a mushroom that destroys all enemies in a huge radius - but makes the square where it detonated temporary unplantable.

Likewise, the zombie hordes become increasingly colorful. You might find zombies with metal buckets on their heads which allow them to take many more hits - or you might find a zombie who proves that disco might not be as dead as you thought it was.

Plants vs. Zombies is a very entertaining little time-waster and I can see it working on a mobile platform very well. It might not be something you play for hours on end, but it beats having nothing to do while waiting for the bus.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
+1
#6953157 Nov 08, 2012 at 12:56 AM
Guides
561 Posts
Well, I bought all three games, I actually liked Plants vs. Zombies as it is basically mindless, but it is a game that you can't be playing and say, watching the Bronco's game, as you have to keep interacting at a relatively fast pace. So I talked my granddaughter Ivy, who said she has completed the game on her own mobile to get the game to an upper level one. For those of you who are not purchasing the game, you plant things and try to keep the zombies from taking over your house. They come in waves from the right side of the screen.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RFod_uRgvWI&feature=plcp

I also watched her play and asked her some questions about what you learn (apparently not much), it is more entertaining than anything else, but you do learn strategy, there are optimal places to plant certain objects in order to kill the most zombies at a time. You do learn good hand/eye coordination. It does level you up, and give you a special new tool after you complete X sub-levels.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cc0w2PomLgk&feature=plcp

Obviously we have a good relationship and she is use to being interviewed and photographed. Now she is good at Plants v. Zombies, but wait till I get her to try Minecraft!

Hope you enjoyed our little video romp.
+1
#6953192 Nov 08, 2012 at 01:14 AM
Guides
561 Posts
#6945280 Leedale wrote:

Hi folks!

Here's my video review of Minecraft on the iPad:
http://www.youtube.com/user/leedaleshepherd1

Best,
-LeeDale



This was so fabulous, I can't top this! LOL I probably will try but I am having a hard time working in Minecraft in the iPad, can't seem to get the rhythm of whacking away and viewing what I am doing! Note: If you don't play Minecraft, then here is a quick review. You Mine. You Craft. That's it. and you can hold something in your hand, but you start with basically just a wooden plank, This is houw you mine. You have to hit things (cubes) of wood (trees) sand, or granite, and you store them in an inventory till you have enough to "craft" something, like a better pickaxe out of stone, or later iron, or diamond, etc. There are 64 levels down and the "good stuff is at the bottom, so is the lava, and if you fall in you generally die, same with deep water... you respawn where you came in. Try to build your house near there! It is Mine, then Craft, then mine, then craft, endless and self-directed so it would be called a "sandbox" as there is nothing to really win, there is no end game. You do get experience points which disappear when you die. You DO need the Minecraft Wiki or you are absolutely lost, or a good guide, Hawkye guided me this summer (sitting next to me on a different computer).
+1
#6953940 Nov 08, 2012 at 07:17 AM
Initiate
45 Posts
My reviews:
Plants vs Zombies
The young lady is right, you learn how to fight zombies.

PvZ is in the "Tower Defence"genre. Essentially, one establishes an automated defensive network which is then subjected to an assault. The challenge is optimising from a limited resource set.

I see the (unrealised) potential of Tower Defence games to be in: Economics-Resource Management. I imagine this kind of game might develop as training for disaster management -- a fire/flood/quake/tsunami/cyclone simulation: modelling placement of fire crews, levee banks, emergency centres, mobile hospitals and so on.

Imagine "Darfur is Dying" with the ability to dig a limited number of wells. Whose plan might save the most lives?

Perhaps such simulations might ultimately crowd-source potential emergency management plans, which "compete" in a Darwinian fashion to be most efficient?
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
+1
#6954161 Nov 08, 2012 at 08:33 AM
Guides
561 Posts
#6953940 Michael Barry wrote:

My reviews:
Plants vs Zombies
The young lady is right, you learn how to fight zombies.

PvZ is in the "Tower Defence"genre. Essentially, one establishes an automated defensive network which is then subjected to an assault. The challenge is optimising from a limited resource set.



Thanks I wlll let her know. You are correct, I see it also as almost like a chess game, your home as a stationary "king" and the attack is non-stop, you do learn strategy, you learn the strength of different plants (weapons) and how best to deploy them. It is experiential learning, with repetitive trials increasing ability. It is a "first-person shooter" game. It is also as you pointed out basically a "castle defense" preparing for the siege, and time and experience creates new and more effective weapons. I think it is the "Plant and Stay) I find interesting because it is difficult to move something once you have designated a square for it to occupy. You do earn a shovel a few levels in... so it is possible.

When I owned and operated a private prison 1996-1981 we held Cuban juveniles (15-18 years old males) Muralitos boatlift, and we realized early on that they really lacked small eye-hand coordination, so we bought a batch of the "new" hand held games, and gave them to the prisoners, later testing showed it was effective in learning that skill

Tetris teaches spacial orientation, PvE is really teaching "touch screen" dynamics and we are moving so much from keyboard to touch screen to use and access information. Think of ATMS. Think of scanning your own groceries, entering codes, choices, amount...

Just for fun, here is what kind of games were available in 1979-80.

History of Hand Held Games
+1
#6955821 Nov 08, 2012 at 03:24 PM
Guides
111 Posts
#6953940 Michael Barry wrote:

I see the (unrealised) potential of Tower Defence games to be in: Economics-Resource Management. I imagine this kind of game might develop as training for disaster management -- a fire/flood/quake/tsunami/cyclone simulation: modelling placement of fire crews, levee banks, emergency centres, mobile hospitals and so on.



This is a very interesting idea. Since the underlying concept of such games is resource management, I can see that transition into education going well. PvZ is a relatively tame Tower Defense game, there are other that are significantly more hectic and require a lot more focus - especially ones that require you to defend more than one "screen" at once. Those more hectic environments could be used to simulate the time-critical disaster management scenarios you brought up. Excellent points!
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
+2
#6956455 Nov 08, 2012 at 06:06 PM
Initiate
45 Posts
While we're on these games -- have a look at what can be done in Minecraft.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=AU&hl=en-GB&v=ooTS9Z6PFh0

The video demonstrates a "Mousetrap" style setup (remember the game -- where you have a ball that rolls to trip a lever which drops a block which....eventually catches a mouse) where one action leads to others which eventually blow up a giant Creeper effigy.

This "machine" entirely uses the internal dynamics of Minecraft. Fascinating! Imagine having your students create these as part of an assignment, to carry out a particular task or tasks?

I might grade them according to how independently their machine operates. Highest mark to the perpetual motion machine!
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
+1
#6959921 Nov 09, 2012 at 02:06 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
#6956455 Michael Barry wrote:

While we're on these games -- have a look at what can be done in Minecraft.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=AU&hl=en-GB&v=ooTS9Z6PFh0

The video demonstrates a "Mousetrap" style setup (remember the game -- where you have a ball that rolls to trip a lever which drops a block which....eventually catches a mouse) where one action leads to others which eventually blow up a giant Creeper effigy.

This "machine" entirely uses the internal dynamics of Minecraft. Fascinating! Imagine having your students create these as part of an assignment, to carry out a particular task or tasks?



I've considered Minecraft for basic Computer Science courses, before, to demonstrate the very basics of computation. In Minecraft, I've seen people create calculators (complete with displays), logic gates, combination locks, and the like. Like you noted, this was only using the physics within the game itself.

Calculator (it snowed in the calculator during the video): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DS3s4iVijpA

Combo Lock: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6WRANidUZc

Functional CPU (capable of loading data in RAM):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=yuMlhKI-pzE

How's that for demonstrating programming logic? Of course, the issue is that there's quite a learning curve for the game itself. My concern would be that it would too far removed from the material the students were supposed to be learning.

-LeeDale
+2
#6962061 Nov 10, 2012 at 02:39 AM
Guides
561 Posts
@LeeDale @ @ Michael Barry, that learning curve is difficult, I see these things built in Minecraft and all I can say is "Where the h*ll did they get the time!" I have enough trouble just getting porkchops for the dogs! ;) This is some amazing stuff! I am now in a learning curve with iPad Minecraft, actually going to use Ivy as the experimental "miner" tomorrow Saturday, er, ah Michael you will probably be in your sleep cycle. . . I am having problems controlling my visual as well as figuring out how to bring up crafting tables, etc., of course I could use the "help" menu or read the "manual" but after all isn't that the court of last resort for geeks?

See you tommorrow, been busy grading online classes with a deadline of midnight (got it all done by 12:06 Am, and now of course it is 12:38 Am and I have time for a game of Online Magic the Gathering before going to sleep.
+1
#6965048 Nov 10, 2012 at 09:02 PM
Guides
561 Posts
Creatorverse. Non-sciences majors as well as anyone who is the least bit dyslexic are at such a disadvantage in this game that I find it confusing yet simplistic. It does teach the principles of physics, dense, light, magnetic, etc. I have no desire to explore this in a game, lost my re-engagment in about five minutes. The tutorials at the game page site really tell all that you can do. Ivy's opinion, "Not a chance, I want things that are brilliantly colored and fun to play." I don't think Ivy lasted as long as I did.

Minecraft. Ivy and I both tried to become competent in the iPad app, I probably could and so could she but it was a, "Why?" as again it is simplistic, she likened it to Legos but you can't just go by them you have to mine the d*mn things." "I didn't like Legos." She could see the use to get our "student's of the MOOC" involved in learning how you move about in games and there is a sense of accomplishment if you build something. She did survive the first night on the PC version, and seemed adapt at killing creepers. So I let her play in the world I have been working on for several months in prep for this immersion in the Spring or Summer.

I regret to inform you that on playing in Peaceful, her interest in racing forward to see what was next resulted in my character's death and respawn and the loss of a compass, several iron enchanted equipment pieces, and various other useful tools. However, even she was sorry to see that she took six of the eight dogs into the lava with her. . . RIP. . . we still have two.

Boredom, for Ivy? In about twelve minutes. She did like exploring the world.
+1
#6969391 Nov 11, 2012 at 10:16 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
As per usual, I'm a little like a hammer thinking everything is a nail. :D

I teach technology, so all the apps I see, I try to figure out how I could use them for that!

Creatorverse was confusing at first. I am of the opinion that I should be able to poke at an app for a couple of minutes and be able to figure it out. This one took me around three minutes. However, when I did figure it out I was pretty happy with what I found.

It's kind of like virtual Tinker Toys with physics. I saw a way to create a trigger for other events to happen, allowing for user input. I saw ways to teleport objects, multiply them, blow them around, and attract them with a magnet. I could almost see a use for it in teaching simple engineering, physics, or even a touch of game physics.

What I really enjoyed was when I got a look at creations that other users have shared. I saw a pinball game, a baseball game, and several other cool and creative uses. Be sure to take a look at them (it's the polka-dotted ball in the upper right corner).

Unlike the other app that I posted about (Simple Physics), this app doesn't have a game mode of any sort. Frankly, I think it could benefit from it. Giving users challenges to overcome gives them a goal. It's much harder to think up reasons to use the app otherwise.


A User's Creation in Creatorverse - Skeleton by Leedale Shepherd, on Flickr


A User's Creation in Creatorverse - Tilt-a-maze by Leedale Shepherd, on Flickr
+1
Page 1