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#6942519 Nov 05, 2012 at 05:37 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guild Officer
343 Posts
Augmented Reality, ARGs and QR Codes
How do you think you could use them in your course to create a mobile game?
twitter @kzenovka
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Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#6943333 Nov 05, 2012 at 09:32 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guides
561 Posts
I was going to say I am not using QRs this season, but in fact I have a QR on my instructor information on the first page of our Desire2Learn class site, it would take them to my facebook page.

As to a mobile game, I can think of one application that might work at a college. That you start at one place and the QR shows a map and a route to say, admissions, when you get there, there is another one that takes you to advising, a neat way to get them to tour the campus with something as a reward at the end.

I suppose I could put QR codes for each specific student, would have to take you to a web page that showed their picture, and put the QR codes into a People Bingo Game and have them look up the student find them and have them sign the space... want to help build it Kae?

We used QRs at the altar for the Chicano/a Studies Class last year, at the museum, each student had items for their loved one on the altar, and the QR would take them to an Animoto site that would show the name of the student and the loved one and then what items were there and why. I had some things there too, here is a look at that one QR linked Animoto
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#6951514 Nov 07, 2012 at 03:52 PM
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111 Posts
#6943333 grasshopper98 wrote:

As to a mobile game, I can think of one application that might work at a college. That you start at one place and the QR shows a map and a route to say, admissions, when you get there, there is another one that takes you to advising, a neat way to get them to tour the campus with something as a reward at the end.



...Huh. That was basically my idea, so now I have to come up with something different.

Well, what if, for something like a financial class, there was something to keep track of various markets and do some virtual investing? Students could (ideally) learn to invest wisely and learn terms like "growth stock mutual fund" which sound complicated but really aren't.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6954220 Nov 08, 2012 at 08:52 AM
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561 Posts
#6951514 Hawkye wrote:

#6943333 grasshopper98 wrote:

As to a mobile game, I can think of one application that might work at a college. That you start at one place and the QR shows a map and a route to say, admissions, when you get there, there is another one that takes you to advising, a neat way to get them to tour the campus with something as a reward at the end.



...Huh. That was basically my idea, so now I have to come up with something different.



Sorry Hawkye, that is what you get for talking to me in real life. We do actually use augmented reality in our classrooms when we use computers to show power point (ok that is a bad example -- nothing worse than an instructor putting up a power point and then reading it), but my classes are in a computer classroom even if they are social science. We were discussing ART the other day, and they were sent on their computers to take the virtual tour of the Sistine Chapel and then to a pre-historic cave in France and discussed the differences and why each fit the culture of the time and place.

Sistine Chapel Virtual Tour

Lascaux Cave - France Virtual Tour
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#7009231 Nov 20, 2012 at 11:15 PM
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45 Posts
An article in New Scientist about a Harry Potter AR "book":
http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/culturelab/2012/11/harry-potter-augmented-reality.html

At first glance, the Sony PlayStation Wonderbook, which comes out this week, isn’t terribly enchanting: a chunky, blue volume featuring a few pages of AR codes.

But once you get started, it is clear this game goes well beyond gimmickry. Of course, it helps that Wonderbook launches with The Book of Spells, inspired by Harry Potter and featuring original content from J. K. Rowling. And that boring-looking blue book? On screen it comes to life, with blooms of ink spreading across its pages in a way reminiscent of the Marauder’s Map in the Potter books and movies...

...Starting with a book that contains no text, only pages of codes, might at first seem like just another excuse to showcase AR capabilities. But the physical presence of the Wonderbook brings the stories into your space - and brings you into the stories. Turning real pages also adds a level of immersion and control you wouldn’t otherwise have.

The Wonderbook won’t revolutionise books, or replace reading. But it certainly pushes AR into new territory - at the very heart of the enchantment and delight provided by the Book of Spells. And that novelty doesn’t wear off quickly, for big kids and little ones alike.


It sounds great, at least in this breathless advertorial. The "book" and "wand" appear to be points of reference for the unfolding action; so, for example, turning the page might trigger a particular special effect, like fairy dust falling from between the pages.

Of course electronic games will lead the education industry; the laws of budgetary gravitation make that almost inevitable.

So from me, two questions:
1. What educational possibilities are opened by this "Wonderbook" technology?
2. Now that this MOOC is finished, where do we go to continue the conversation?
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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