Notify Message
Forums
Page 1
Search
#6969249 Nov 11, 2012 at 09:26 PM
Herald
32 Posts
For those of you who aren't aware, I am working (slowly) on my M.Ed. in Distance Education and Instructional Design at the University of Athabasca in Alberta, Canada (interestingly, this university was where Seimens and Downes did much of their work on connectivism and MOOCs like the one we are taking).

At any rate, I am fascinated with GBL and its utility in F2F learning or across great distances. Perhaps more for me than anyone else, I am openly declaring that I want to do my thesis work in this area - Instructional Design for Game-Based Learning at a Distance. For Engagement. For better classrooms (F2F, Mobile, Distance-only, and blended) everywhere.

I guess I am throwing this out to the participants of this MOOC because I am interested to know the group's opinion of the major scholarly needs of the area. What areas need to have light shed upon them? There seems to be quite a bit of conventional information out there about the practice of using games to learn (not surprisingly), but what do people here think would most benefit from scholarly investigation?

I am strongly drawn to this area, though I am not always able to participate as fully as I like in this class. I am in for the long haul and willing to contribute to growing awareness of this set of practices. Drop me a line if you'd like to chat!

Scott
+1
#6970570 Nov 12, 2012 at 07:06 AM
Initiate
45 Posts
Badbuddha: I'm also considering postgraduate study in the field. I'm in the process of arm-twisting my employer to part with some bucks for the privilege of having my brain expand to the size of a planet.

Perhaps we could become study buddies? If, of course, it happens for us.

Not a complete reply to your question, but I've noticed how much educational research is done at the Primary (Elementary) school level. The results are then often applied to learning in general, and (surprise, surprise) fail to make any impact.

I understand the researchers' preference -- primary classrooms are much more controllable than secondary, where the kids have a number of classes in any given day, with a different adult each time and often in different locations, with different rules for each setting.

I'd like to see good empirical research done with adolescents. Those of us who teach them know they are no longer quite the same as delightful little Primary school kiddies. In what ways do these developing adults use -- or misuse -- their educational opportunities?

Relevant to distance education: the School of the Air is an interesting distance education provider for schoolkids. It has broadcast from Alice Springs (geographical centre of the continent) since 1948, and was officially established in 1951:
http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/school-of-the-air

Each State/Territory government has its own distance education system as well. I think the University of the South Pacific, based in Suva/Fiji but with campuses in different countries, also uses a variety of means to serve its students across the islands.

An old colleague lectured there for a few years and I now have a reason to renew an interesting acquaintance.
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
+1
#6972359 Nov 12, 2012 at 02:51 PM
Herald
32 Posts
Hi Michael! I think study buddying is a good thing to develop. I am also in secondary ed and so I can assure you that my work will be with the population you identify. I would really like to be able to collect and share resources with you on the topic. This MOOC is a good place to start, but it's far from an easy-access annotated bibliography (which may be a good project for me this semester...use this MOOC as the beginning of an annotated bibliography to share with the group).

So, distance be damned, I think we'd make good mates! (See my command of the Australian vernacular?)
+1
#6974644 Nov 13, 2012 at 01:22 AM
Initiate
45 Posts
Regardless of the outcome of my study funding application, I'll be putting gamification in place for my classes so we'll stay in touch.

I think study buddying is a good thing to develop. I am also in secondary ed and so I can assure you that my work will be with the population you identify.

My previous experience of graduate study was incredibly isolating -- it would be fantastic to have someone to field complaints, even if no studying is done!

I've sought funding for a classroom set of Minecraft for Business Studies; I think I can map 50% of the curriculum into the game. Most of the kids know Minecraft, but most importantly I've played it.

I would really like to be able to collect and share resources with you on the topic. This MOOC is a good place to start, but it's far from an easy-access annotated bibliography (which may be a good project for me this semester...use this MOOC as the beginning of an annotated bibliography to share with the group).

In keeping with the open access philosophy of this MOOC, I'd be interested in perhaps contributing to some kind of Wiki-type annotated bibliography?

(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
+1
#7002306 Nov 19, 2012 at 12:47 PM
Herald
32 Posts
That's a great idea! I would have to learn Wiki notation but I have been wanting to know that anyway. Also, I have a feeling that Minecraft would be a really great tool for that kind of class. I haven't made any time to play it...but I have the free demo on my phone now. What, really, is the goal of the game?
+0
#7002317 Nov 19, 2012 at 12:49 PM
Herald
32 Posts
Also, please email me at badbuddha0@gmail.com so we can connect outside of the MOOC. Additionally, my Twitter is @ScottMeunier.
+0
Page 1