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#6969439 Nov 11, 2012 at 10:39 PM
Guild Officer
343 Posts
What Questions are you asking of your students and the effectiveness of games based learning? Full video , PowerPoint on Slideshare

Learning Outcomes 2 min 4 sec to 21 min 30 sec

Process Evaluation 21 min 30 sec to 35 min 32 sec

Net Effect 35 min 32 sec to 47 min 35 sec

Goal Based 47 min 35 sec to 57 min 39 sec

"Gaming the System" 57 min 39 sec to 1 hr 7 min 37 sec

Comparison

Satisfaction

Who are our students

What are their experiences

Or What game components should be included?
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#6984586 Nov 15, 2012 at 01:09 AM
Guides
561 Posts
I want to give a fuller answer to this early on Thursday, I really want to review all those links. (just not feeling too well tonight...) The "grasshopper" is down! :(
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#6986398 Nov 15, 2012 at 10:54 AM
Guides
561 Posts
The Grasshopper Lives! ;) I think the statement in the Games and Assessment Week 6 is effective in explaining assessment. “Asking the right question is the most difficult part of an assignment,” and one that I think many of us spend sleepless nights trying to formulate.

In my ANT 225 Anthropology of Religion class, 2011, Spring, I think I asked the right questions trying to find an “advertising word” for religion. I would say we played a game, we interviewed, wrote up and then tried to guess which word Wordle Wordle.net would show the largest, that is, the word most used by the interviewees. No one guessed it, and when it came up, there was an “ah ha” moment in the class.

We were searching for the one emotion/word that would identify what we experience in a religion, as if we were going to sell it to people like a product. In that case the advertisers know or have identified a “trigger emotion” that makes you want to be part of their product “family.” Excellent examples are Apple, Nike and BMW, all are selling you not only their product but your inclusion and loyalty to that product. In religion we would call that the “collective effervescence” that Durkheim identified. It may surprise you too. Here is the slide show God and Skittles

It played the theme from 2001 at the beginning and Jeopardy for the one minute paper at the end. As you can see a second question, for a one-minute paper was asked of the participants at the end regarding text and visual presentation of the same material. As a side note I showed this to my Anthropology classes this week and when the text and the visual representation of the text are shown on the same slide. I did say that theWordle was a visual representation of the text and gave them a minute or so to examine the slide. I asked three question: “How many of you read the text? How many of you looked at the “Wordle” for the information? How Many of you read the text and also got information from the text? I was surprised. Not one person had read the text once they knew it was represented visually!

We are moving from a text-based society to a visual one, if we haven’t already, and the introduction of gaming in our classroom, the gamification, when done well, will be very effective in student learning.

This was presented in a Teaching With Purpose Series at Front Range Community College. I have to admit I have had the pleasure of being in presentations by Monica Geist and through this mooc you do get the benefit of her expertise. This was “Easy Fun: Curiosity, we had discussed the “branding” of commercial ventures including churches, and “badges” in this case the symbols of religion that one wears or displays.

Finally, in answer to the question as to whether teachers are adequately trained? I think the overall answer is “No,” and especially at a college level. We are experts in our discipline, but how many classes did we have in the Department of Education? Probably none. Did we student teach? No. We might have T.A.ed a class. I used to joke with my Dissertation Advisor, Dr. Robert Hackenberg, that the classes I T.A.ed, all I had to remember was, “Dr. Hackenberg isn’t here today and here is the video he wanted you to see.” Seldom do professors turn over classes in the social sciences to their T.A.s., we generally are assigned to oversee labs, in my case in Physical Anthropology and Archaeology.

My college, Front Range Community College, is doing a great job, I think, in the last few years of getting voluntary training for their instructors both full-time and part time, we have had so many opportunities to go to seminars, or participate in series or apply for student learning grants. However, few really take advantage of these and that is true of part-time instructors. We run an 80% part-time faculty. The Teaching with Purpose was focused on Part-Time faculty, and we did get paid to attend. It was limited to only xx participants due to space and other consideration. We really are doing more with less! That is why these MOOCS are so vital to the future of education. Yes, they have to be funded, but look at the number of people that are reached and what information is freely disseminated. I am so proud to be part of this mooc. We also have a Teaching with Technology Conference in May every year. This is the description for 2011 of the sessions. FRCC Teaching with Technology 2011 I have a presentation on “Playing the Game and other Forms of Engagement.” Playing the Game

$$$ are always a concern, and the public will fund prisons ahead of education every time! Where does your state rank in education funding? Mine? Check out Colorado, Colordo Statistics on Educational Funding And, this is the saddest part. “$0 Colorado’s annual direct state funding for professional development and teacher mentoring and induction programs. [Ed Week, 2012 Quality Counts, from EPE Research Center Annual State Policy Survey 2011]” 27 states do provide direct funding, is yours one?

I know we have participants from all over the world, but if you could share your statistics with us that would be great!
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#6994827 Nov 17, 2012 at 10:53 AM
Guides
561 Posts
I just wanted to add this to the assessment of games discussion and share a cooperative board game.

I was at Atomic Goblins, in Longmont, CO on Friday night for FNM Tournament (Magic the Gathering) and at another table a game company representative was teaching four players SPACE ALERT. It is unusual in that it is "It's a cooperative team survival game. Players become crew members of a small spaceship scanning dangerous sectors of galaxy. The missions last just 10 real-time minutes (hyperspace jump, sector scan, hyperspace jump back) and the only task the players have is to protect their ship." It is for 4-5 players, difficult with three and no room for six player as you have assigned rules (captain, weapons, etc.)

I took a short video with my cell-phone to show the start of the learning curve, there is a second video that has someone explaining the game in detail.

We just don't see a lot of cooperative board games, so thought you might like to look at how the players learn and how complicated the rules are that they end up absorbing. Game takes about 30 minutes max.

First time learners at Atomic Goblins

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9V34gqiRdWQ&feature=plcp

Deep explanation of how the game works

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMPDIjitdQM&noredirect=1

This game also comes with two CDs with notifications of alerts, at Atomic Goblins those CDs were loaded onto iPhone, and played through it making the game very transportable. Hope you enjoy it

Can anyone add to our list of cooperative games?

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#6995378 Nov 17, 2012 at 01:47 PM
Initiate
26 Posts
Somehow this seemed to fit here.
Excerpt from a blog post about a college prof's experience teaching high school math:

"If a student’s self-concept is based on past academic achievement and future performance correlates strongly with self-concept, how can we break this cycle?

I learned that, regardless of how “tough” some students are or how weak their math skills are, teenagers still love feeling successful when they become good at something or when they figure something out. A sequence of small successes can lead students to develop intrinsic motivation to learn and take risks in a classroom. One way to stage these sequences of successes is through minute, detailed, careful scaffolding of mathematics content…."

Math Professor Teaches High School Classes (Darryl Young)
http://larrycuban.wordpress.com/2012/11/14/math-professor-teaches-high-school-classes-darryl-yong/

Riven
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#6996869 Nov 17, 2012 at 10:48 PM
Guides
561 Posts
Rivenhomewood, alas, I think I referred to you once as "ravenhomewood," so my sincere apology. I read the article you linked and it works for a community college too, especially the evaluation part. Although there are many good changes, we are at 80% to 20% part-time to full-time, this puts an enormous load on our chairs to try to teach their own classes and evaluate us. We do have an instructional coach we can confer with and good seminars, etc., we can attend.

He is correct, politics, culture, all new and different. I can assure you from personal experience, my transition from a competitive business private industry world to education was traumatic, I suffered cultural shock. Different pace, different rules, different norms and mores. I still have to shift to another internal avatar when working with educators.

I would like to comment on his ideas that a student's belief in himself/herself is key to the overall and future success. Giving students regardless of their being adults or K-12, some simple things they can succeed in during your class right away is so important. We need to have an assignment completed in the first week to keep the student from being dropped as a "no show" and an introductory discussion doesn't count. These are face-to-face classes that have heavy Desire2Learn content. If I had some heavy graded discussions I could convert it to online since so much is loaded, one class is actually taught as a hybrid with those discussions. I have two assignments:

1. An introductory discussion, simple instructions, respond to two peer.

2. A dropbox where you answer three questions, one is on which chapter do you think you will like the best, and another is asking them now that they have read the syllabus how do they plan on meeting the requirements of the class, for examples.

Now these have so few points it doesn't really affect their grade, it is about 5% but I kinda stay on everyone so they complete it, telling them I don't want them to get off to a bad start. Then when I grade I write personal comments they can see anytime if they click on grades. They help each other. They all win.

It seems as we move onto other material and towards the first quiz and project proposal, they aren't afraid of dropboxes, discussions or anything connected to the class, they are set to expect to do well.

I also may put in my online classes the words "GOLD STAR" after comments on a submission only they can see. I also sometimes put (that is before badging became ok) that I wasn't sure I should give adults gold stars. I had one student, a male of about 45, write and say how happy it made him and he printed that out to show his family and co-workers, said he hadn't had one since sixth grade. Ah the power of assessment and BADGING.
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#6996870 Nov 17, 2012 at 10:48 PM
Guides
561 Posts
Rivenhomewood, alas, I think I referred to you once as "ravenhomewood," so my sincere apology. I read the article you linked and it works for a community college too, especially the evaluation part. Although there are many good changes, we are at 80% to 20% part-time to full-time, this puts an enormous load on our chairs to try to teach their own classes and evaluate us. We do have an instructional coach we can confer with and good seminars, etc., we can attend.

He is correct, politics, culture, all new and different. I can assure you from personal experience, my transition from a competitive business private industry world to education was traumatic, I suffered cultural shock. Different pace, different rules, different norms and mores. I still have to shift to another internal avatar when working with educators.

I would like to comment on his ideas that a student's belief in himself/herself is key to the overall and future success. Giving students regardless of their being adults or K-12, some simple things they can succeed in during your class right away is so important. We need to have an assignment completed in the first week to keep the student from being dropped as a "no show" and an introductory discussion doesn't count. These are face-to-face classes that have heavy Desire2Learn content. If I had some heavy graded discussions I could convert it to online since so much is loaded, one class is actually taught as a hybrid with those discussions. I have two assignments:

1. An introductory discussion, simple instructions, respond to two peer.

2. A dropbox where you answer three questions, one is on which chapter do you think you will like the best, and another is asking them now that they have read the syllabus how do they plan on meeting the requirements of the class, for examples.

Now these have so few points it doesn't really affect their grade, it is about 5% but I kinda stay on everyone so they complete it, telling them I don't want them to get off to a bad start. Then when I grade I write personal comments they can see anytime if they click on grades. They help each other. They all win.

It seems as we move onto other material and towards the first quiz and project proposal, they aren't afraid of dropboxes, discussions or anything connected to the class, they are set to expect to do well.

I also may put in my online classes the words "GOLD STAR" after comments on a submission only they can see. I also sometimes put (that is before badging became ok) that I wasn't sure I should give adults gold stars. I had one student, a male of about 45, write and say how happy it made him and he printed that out to show his family and co-workers, said he hadn't had one since sixth grade. Ah the power of assessment and BADGING.
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