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#6969529 Nov 11, 2012 at 11:17 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guild Officer
343 Posts
This is also the topic for this week's tweetchat how do we add fiero for Assignments and Assessments?

Fun, Flow and Fiero video


Death Scene 2 by Center4EduPunx, on Flickr

twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#6977395 Nov 13, 2012 at 02:52 PM
Guides
111 Posts
Well, the best I can come up with in my tiny brain is that there needs to be something about an assignment that makes one feel a rush of elation when they complete it. There is a precarious pH balance where something is challenging enough to make one feel really good after completing it. It is all too easy to push it to something so difficult it feels like it's too frustrating to complete. To make things even more complicated, that point tends to vary between individuals and also between different subjects. I would be very interested in how people teaching specific subjects might approach this challenge.
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#6978255 Nov 13, 2012 at 05:53 PM
Bard
20 Posts
Good points, Hawkeye. Should we teach to the top and hope that the lower denominator catches up? Or do we hope for a community of practice?

I've been meaning to post here about how my classes I took into the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum went! Most impressively, they helped each other with this challenge without my asking them to do so. These are rural students without a lot of "travel experience..."

Students commented “the rest of the students are missing out: this is cool” and “I will continue to research in this space even if I am not given classwork or extra credit.” The instructor also observed a supportive community of practice form, with students who had created avatars and successfully moved about the virtual space helping each other on laptops and excitedly finding each other’s avatars within the virtual space (without any prompting from the instructor). Thus, an instant community of experts was formed, with students naturally helping each other progress by sharing expertise gained. Students were also able to interact with visitors from all over the world, viewing the same content held in the Smithsonian Museum building (which ironically and sadly was closed that week due to Hurricane Sandy) as well as posed questions to and received expert knowledge from Curator Carillo
XQC
Exquisite Corpse
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#6988155 Nov 15, 2012 at 05:20 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#6978255 exquisite.corpse wrote:

Good points, Hawkeye. Should we teach to the top and hope that the lower denominator catches up? Or do we hope for a community of practice?

I've been meaning to post here about how my classes I took into the Smithsonian Latino Virtual Museum went! Most impressively, they helped each other with this challenge without my asking them to do so. These are rural students without a lot of "travel experience..."

Students commented “the rest of the students are missing out: this is cool” and “I will continue to research in this space even if I am not given classwork or extra credit.” The instructor also observed a supportive community of practice form, with students who had created avatars and successfully moved about the virtual space helping each other on laptops and excitedly finding each other’s avatars within the virtual space (without any prompting from the instructor). Thus, an instant community of experts was formed, with students naturally helping each other progress by sharing expertise gained. Students were also able to interact with visitors from all over the world, viewing the same content held in the Smithsonian Museum building (which ironically and sadly was closed that week due to Hurricane Sandy) as well as posed questions to and received expert knowledge from Curator Carillo



I just have an aversion to teaching from the top, but that is just me. I like to think of all of my class as being on a journey and I have to be two places, in front leading and have an avatar at the back to make sure no one gets left behind. We did use two virtual tours in my class for the Cultural Anthropology chapter on Religion. I wont say there was FIERO on the cave painting one but the one on the Sistine chapel did make them gasp! They had the realization that they could explore something in a virtual world they may never get to see in real life.

Sistine Chapel

Lascaux Cave


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#6988160 Nov 15, 2012 at 05:21 PM
Initiate
108 Posts
I can't remember the exact formula, but there is one that states motivation = your perceived ability X the reward of completing the task.

Therefore, in asking what difficulty level we work to, I think it's essential to work to EVERY difficulty level. I've been trying to design assignments that offer a variety of choices. Students can work at as high or as low a level as they choose. True, sometimes students choose to work at a level that is lower than what they are capable of, but most often I find that students do choose an appropriate level.

This way, students have choices, which can increase the perceived value of the task, and they can tailor their own difficulty, which hopefully increases their perceived ability (interestingly,I remember that it was PERCEIVED ability rather than ACTUAL ability).

Don’t do work that just exists within your classroom... do work that changes the world. -Will Richardson

http://www.gamifymyclass.blogspot.ca
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#6991404 Nov 16, 2012 at 12:09 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
#6988160 missrithenay wrote:

I can't remember the exact formula, but there is one that states motivation = your perceived ability X the reward of completing the task.

Therefore, in asking what difficulty level we work to, I think it's essential to work to EVERY difficulty level. I've been trying to design assignments that offer a variety of choices. Students can work at as high or as low a level as they choose. True, sometimes students choose to work at a level that is lower than what they are capable of, but most often I find that students do choose an appropriate level.

This way, students have choices, which can increase the perceived value of the task, and they can tailor their own difficulty, which hopefully increases their perceived ability (interestingly,I remember that it was PERCEIVED ability rather than ACTUAL ability).



I have found that giving students a choice, even a small one, can make a HUGE difference in the perceived value of the assignment and the resulting reward. It helps students "own" that assignment. (Or even...pwn?)

The formula I think you're referring to is Voom's: "Motivation = Perceived Probability of Success (Expectancy) * Connection of Success and Reward (Instrumentality) *
Value of Obtaining Goal (Valence, Value)" - I found it in this interesting PDF from a course at Florida State http://mailer.fsu.edu/~kiw05/mot_2_spring_2007/motivation/motivation_approaches.pdf.

As I work with adults (some who are brand new adults), I often see people work at less than their top ability when something else in their lives is stealing their time and energy. I honestly don't mind that, though. It still gets the work done and it gives that student HOPE that they might still pass the class even though they're going through a divorce/sick child/bankruptcy/what-have-you.

XQC, I'd been meaning to ask you how your project went with the Smithsonian. I'm glad that it went well! Virtual museum trips are fun. I've brought students to the Primtings museum in Second Life, which is an excellent way to show students artwork that is NPIRL (Not Possible In Real Life).

Grasshopper, that is a neat virtual tour there! I've previously brought students to a Sistine Chapel build in Second Life, to show them how texturing can dramatically change a 3D model. The site you use would work well for an Art History class as well.

I'm looking forward to seeing more integration with virtual worlds (free ones, I mean, that even allow some user content generation) into browsers. I know that the Unity editor is starting to really see some jumps forward in this direction.

Giving students the ability to immerse themselves in an environment instead of having to rely on pictures in a book (like my Art History and Humanities courses) is a great way to give students that feeling of "being there". That immediacy can really help boost the fiero factor, too.
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