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#6969535 Nov 11, 2012 at 11:19 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guild Officer
343 Posts
How do we assess the learning that happens inside and outside a MOOC?

And what aspects do we look at?


Platform by Center4EduPunx, on Flickr

Synchronous v. Asynchronous?

Novice v. Expert?

Assessing Deeper Learning in Social Learning Environments

What about the different types of MOOCs

And for the Games MOOC

Connectivist and Social Network Knowledge Construction
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



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#6972596 Nov 12, 2012 at 03:44 PM
Herald
32 Posts
Will the resources identified in this course be maintained? Are there other instances of this topic being considered or is there a desire to move to a different form of engagement with this community? I'd like to keep this ball rolling in an official academic sort of way...
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#6972740 Nov 12, 2012 at 04:17 PM · Edited over 7 years ago
Guild Officer
343 Posts
We are keeping these resources. The Games MOOC will go on hiatus and come back in March. That gives everyone time to celebrate the holidays and for some of us time to start a new semester.

We started G.A.M.E. out of the first iteration of the MOOC. This is a group of gamer educators we started and so far we started a site and monthly Thursday night webinars. We are planning on having a meeting in December to see what else we would to add.


twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



+3
#6977313 Nov 13, 2012 at 02:35 PM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guides
111 Posts
#6972596 badbuddha0 wrote:

Will the resources identified in this course be maintained? Are there other instances of this topic being considered or is there a desire to move to a different form of engagement with this community? I'd like to keep this ball rolling in an official academic sort of way...



I'm really glad to see an interest in "keeping the ball rolling." It's really important, I think, for professional educators to take what they get from here and actually run with it. As Kae mentioned, we'll be going on another hiatus, but we will be back. I am eager to see what you and your fellow educators bring back to the table with you!
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
-
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#6979611 Nov 14, 2012 at 02:59 AM · Edited over 8 years ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
Ok, I raised the question of whether or not there will be a Games MOOC III in a separate forum, and apparently the question is answered here!

Awesome on all counts that Games MOOC III will indeed occur. :)

I think that to assess or evaluate anything, we need to first design a rubric (lol) that lists the main criteria by which we will assess a MOOC.

Have to add that Kae's documents in this forum serve as very good start points for coming up with some set criteria. ;)

Maybe we need to create a Google Spreadsheet that allows for group collaboration on filling out the rubric squares of criteria along with explanation; I happen to allow my students to construct the rubric by which their papers will be assessed (students tend to be a lot more critical of their own papers than I would be, which is a good thing). Furthermore, we should probably make different rubrics for assessing the effectiveness of different types of MOOCs (for example, would the level of engaging visuals and site design of a MOOC have bearing over how motivational the MOOC is for its participants? What if it's an xMOOC (content-based MOOC?) that is created based on a "cookie-cutter" site template made by its corporate designer?)

I have to create a mindmap of this issue for myself before I can get back to you on how I think a MOOC should be assessed.

Cogitating . . . (process speed needs an upgrade)
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Twitter @autnes
http://bit.ly/sherryjones


#6972740 kae wrote:

We are keeping these resources. The Games MOOC will go on hiatus and come back in March. That gives everyone time to celebrate the holidays and for some of us time to start a new semester.

We started G.A.M.E. out of the first iteration of the MOOC. This is a group of gamer educators we started and so far we started a site and monthly Thursday night webinars. We are planning on having a meeting in December to see what else we would to add.


Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
+1
#6980247 Nov 14, 2012 at 06:50 AM
Initiate
45 Posts
How do we assess a MOOC?

One possibility that deserves serious consideration is:

DON'T.

According to Heisenberg, observation changes the nature of the phenomenon observed. I hereby propose for discussion the MOOC Uncertainty Principle, in the following corollaries/quantum states:

Quantum 1:
Assessment degrades learning behaviour in direct proportion to the value attached to that assessment.

Quantum 2:
Assessment makes it impossible to know what, or if, a student has learned.

Quantum 3:
One may be certain of learning, or one may assess.

Quantum 4:
With apologies to Oscar Wilde:
All truly valuable learning is worthless.

Quantum 5:
Assessment is inimical to the philosophy and nature of a MOOC.

Quantum 6:
Finally: Learning is a pearl without price. Assessment casts that pearl before swine.
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
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#6981087 Nov 14, 2012 at 10:31 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
Michael,

I sincerely love how you stir up more discussion. This style of MOOC seems to suit you down to the ground. :-)

My questions & responses for some of the Quantums (what an awesome word):

Quantum 1: I would argue the word "value". I think perhaps "emphasis" or even "importance assigned". Value is way too broad a word for a statement like that, IMHO.

Quantum 2: How so? I thought the point of assessment was to assess the knowledge or skill-level of a student/participant. Keep in mind I'm coming at this as a very straightforward technical person. :D

Quantum 3: I'm not sure why these are exclusive to one another?

Other thoughts: Any learning activity, even if it's simply an exploratory discussion such as this, has a goal and is thus assessed. The assessment may be more informal and the course may be intended to generate more discussion, rather than answer questions, but that's still something that either happens or it doesn't.

Mind Erasure,

Rubrics can really simplify things, can't they? I know my project-based classes' grading got more specific (I was going to say easier, but no that's not really true) when I introduced rubric-based grading.

One place to start is with the standards already put in place with this MOOC: the badges. These are a set of standards by which we can start plotting the rest of the evalation of the MOOC, I would think. The badge descriptions themselves may be incomplete, too critical, or not critical enough, so we can't assume that they're perfect. I like the idea of a Google Doc, though. It gives us something more tangible to hang our ideas on rather than just a discussion thread! :P

As you said, we have to take into account what kind of MOOC we're talking about. Assessing this Connectivist Games MOOC (talk about a moving target!!) would be very different from assessing a content-based MOOC. Part of the evaluation of a MOOC such as this would be the surrounding artifacts generated by the participants in the MOOC (Twitter, Blog posts, Diigo links, Flickr images) and so on. With a Connectivist MOOC like this, I would argue it would be much harder.

I would also say that there are some features of this kind of MOOC that would degrade with the kind of assessment we're talking about. We educators tend to be assessing creatures, though. Is it even possible to avoid any kind of assessment? Is there any kind of assessment that wouldn't tend to "degrade the learning behavior" as Michael seems to be indicating?

OK, waaaay too much deep thinking before lunch. I'm going back to my Photoshop and design principles for awhile! LOL!
-LeeDale
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#6981596 Nov 14, 2012 at 12:18 PM
Initiate
45 Posts
#6981087 Leedale wrote:


I sincerely love how you stir up more discussion. This style of MOOC seems to suit you down to the ground. :-)
...
Quantum 2: How so? I thought the point of assessment was to assess the knowledge or skill-level of a student/participant. Keep in mind I'm coming at this as a very straightforward technical person. :D

Quantum 3: I'm not sure why these are exclusive to one another?
...
I would also say that there are some features of this kind of MOOC that would degrade with the kind of assessment we're talking about. We educators tend to be assessing creatures, though. Is it even possible to avoid any kind of assessment? Is there any kind of assessment that wouldn't tend to "degrade the learning behavior" as Michael seems to be indicating?



Ahhh, busted! My MOOC Assessment Quanta were (a little) satirical. However, they spring from discussions surrounding assessment, cheating, plagiarism and institutional learning.

Assessment -- the external force -- changes the objectives of the learner and their enagement with learning. A student asking "Is this on the test?" causes their teacher's heart to sink, on a couple of levels. The educator pauses before they answer, because they know that assessment is driving that student's engagement with the subject material. In the old days, this was called "cart before the horse" or "the tail wagging the dog."

The student is behaving perfectly rationally, concentrating on the outcomes (grades) that their teacher has communicated to them.

Resource constraints prevent us from engaging directly with the learning of a hundred-plus students, so we rely on summary data from a variety of sources.
The summary data is open to "gaming" of various kinds. Coupled with the disruptive effect of high stakes, we have the same situation as professional sports -- for many students, the rewards of cheating and the punishments of failure are creating an irresistible vortex.

Daniel Pink's TED talk outlines what happens to performance when the stakes become higher -- our attention is taken by the stakes, and the quality of engagement suffers. The more complex the task, the greater the disruption.

Education is very complex and the stakes are much, much higher than the kind of monetary rewards Dan Pink used in his experiments.

However, those things easiest to measure -- multi-choice response, for example -- are less useful. Imagine the following question on a final test:

I have learned the following amount in this subject:
A: A great deal of fascinating knowledge from an excellent teacher.
B: Somewhat worthwhile information from a moderately engaging teacher.
C: Very little. The teacher is a knob.


Even if no grade were allocated to the question, and the test were anonymous, certain students would take perverse glee in responding "C".

Further imagine however that the "correct" response ("A") constitutes 100% of the student's grade for the subject. It would be a courageous student who answered "C". If that student (or their parents) had taken out a sizeable student loan, there would be only one rational choice.

Assessment has an opportunity time cost: more, or finer-grained, assessment occurs at the expense of other activities. Those other activities are, broadly, teaching/learning, school administration, or personal life.

The educator who behaved rationally would refuse to allow unpaid overtime to consume their personal time. Fortunately for students, their teachers tend not to be rational!
(Being "down under" doesn't make me backward)
+1
#6984095 Nov 14, 2012 at 10:14 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#6972740 kae wrote:

We are keeping these resources. The Games MOOC will go on hiatus and come back in March. That gives everyone time to celebrate the holidays and for some of us time to start a new semester.

We started G.A.M.E. out of the first iteration of the MOOC. This is a group of gamer educators we started and so far we started a site and monthly Thursday night webinars. We are planning on having a meeting in December to see what else we would to add.



I think that the G.A.M.E was one of the best things to come out of this MOOC and we really do need to keep the resources, only last night I went back and reviewed some posts in previous weeks and was so impressed with the knowledge being shared. I think the Diigo group does help collect information in a different format that I find very effective for personal research.
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#6997089 Nov 18, 2012 at 12:10 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
The educator who behaved rationally would refuse to allow unpaid overtime to consume their personal time. Fortunately for students, their teachers tend not to be rational!

Isn't that the truth, Michael? :D

Finer-grained assessments do tend to take away from other activities. However, I see the creep of technology that might just help us with that (a la Edmodo, perhaps?). Just like copy/paste has helped me automate some small part of my assignment feedback to students, so other pieces of technology might give us some more of our precious classroom time back.

If we can semi-automate some of that finer-grain assessment without cheapening it, perhaps we'll have students who feel more of the push/pull of engagement.

The problem comes when we misuse it or take it for granted. I consider it akin to getting the textbook publisher pack and teaching straight from it without putting in any "value-added" content.

It's not just new websites, either. I see rich data, analysis of metrics, and other number-y things that'll get Abacus all excited coming as well. Again, it'll depend on how it's used by instructors and administrators alike.

-LeeDale
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#7034204 Nov 27, 2012 at 03:52 AM
Consigliere
18 Posts
Thank goodness (re: starting back in March)! I so want to savor and wallow in the stimulus of a gamesmooc without juggling conferences, classes, dozens of research projects and supporting seven doctoral defenses. *grins*

I don't know how you, Chris and the team find time to do it all, but we are so delighted that you do! *cheers*

Lyr Lobo

#6972740 kae wrote:

We are keeping these resources. The Games MOOC will go on hiatus and come back in March. That gives everyone time to celebrate the holidays and for some of us time to start a new semester.

We started G.A.M.E. out of the first iteration of the MOOC. This is a group of gamer educators we started and so far we started a site and monthly Thursday night webinars. We are planning on having a meeting in December to see what else we would to add.


It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#7035810 Nov 27, 2012 at 11:39 AM
Guild Officer
343 Posts
Well March.... is official start back. We'll do tweetchats until December 12th. Then there is a bit of Machinima, World of Warcraft tours and webinars each month with G.A.M.E.

But really... you do so much more! I need to find the time to learn more about the MOSES project you are involved in.
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



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