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#6982361 Nov 14, 2012 at 02:37 PM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
Please feel free to let introduce yourself. It's never too late!
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
Google + gamesmooc@gmail.com



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#6993108 Nov 16, 2012 at 07:59 PM
Initiate
6 Posts
Hello! I am Rurik. I don't get out much anymore but I am here and love the GamesMooc! To find out more about me check out my profile, visiting my blog, or reading here:

Rurik (Rory) Nackerud teaches online in traditional classrooms at the middle, high school and post-secondary levels. His interest in educational technology, immersive learning environments and applying best practices to both professional development and student interactions frame his educational activities. Currently a doctoral student at Portland State University, he continues to study the impacts of new technologies and their influence on education. His doctoral work focusses on Game-based learning and motivation as well as research into iPad implementations, closing the achievement gap, bilingual teacher education and STEM, and how communities and coalitions form around learning experiences (MOOC are cool).


I listened to the presentation by Sherry just now and also had a second chance to listen to her via CCCOnline. Sherry you are a rockstar!
Teaching and Learning in Portland, Oregon
http://rurik.nackerud.net

"The art of teaching is the art of assisting discovery" -- Mark van Doren
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#6999946 Nov 18, 2012 at 07:55 PM · Edited over 6 years ago
Consigliere
61 Posts
Hey Rurik!

So nice to see you here at the Games MOOC! Thanks for the compliment. ;)

I think I saw some of your chats appear when I mentioned the Games MOOC during Nov 16, 2012 Webex session, but your chats disappeared so fast from the screen that I couldn't catch the comments you've made.

Yes! We definitely need more educators joining us at Games MOOC (and MOOCs are indeed "cool"). We need more voices to help us convince others that game-based learning will help motivate our students to learn (through casual and serious games)

In solidarity! (and keep in contact, man~)
Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
sherryjones.edtech@gmail.com
Twitter @autnes
http://bit.ly/sherryjones

#6993108 Rurik Nackerud wrote:

Hello! I am Rurik. I don't get out much anymore but I am here and love the GamesMooc! To find out more about me check out my profile, visiting my blog, or reading here:

Rurik (Rory) Nackerud teaches online in traditional classrooms at the middle, high school and post-secondary levels. His interest in educational technology, immersive learning environments and applying best practices to both professional development and student interactions frame his educational activities. Currently a doctoral student at Portland State University, he continues to study the impacts of new technologies and their influence on education. His doctoral work focusses on Game-based learning and motivation as well as research into iPad implementations, closing the achievement gap, bilingual teacher education and STEM, and how communities and coalitions form around learning experiences (MOOC are cool).


I listened to the presentation by Sherry just now and also had a second chance to listen to her via CCCOnline. Sherry you are a rockstar!

Mind Erasure (aka Sherry Jones)
See my Visual Bio!!
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#7001608 Nov 19, 2012 at 09:57 AM · Edited over 6 years ago
Guides
561 Posts
I agree that we need more educators or even the lurker from another industry (to me education is a business), we charge to deliver a product, and we need to have repeat customers and good "word-of-mouth" advertising. I have to admit not everyone agrees with me that education should be looked on like it is a business.

I also know Rurik in real life, Kae, Rurik, and I [plus my Chicano Studies Class and some Cultural Anthropology students} presented at that Global Online Educuation Conference in 2010, his moving on to CU was a big loss for FRCC so glad to see him lurking about.

I do know that for many (especially part-time) instructors at all levels, really are hesitant to embrace new technology. This is true for anything that is connected to gaming or massive internet use or computers in classrooms where it isn't a "computer class."

I remember, maybe three years ago, at FRCC's Teaching with Technology, Kae and others, helped participants sign up for Animoto, Twitter, Skype and do a small webcam video. Yes, she had a "carrot," if you did all those things you got your name in a drawing. I am glad Kae pushed that envelope!

At least we have gotten past the Luddite phase, and new uses of technology are strongly supported by forward-thinking administrations and instructors are at least examining, if not adapting, gamification and new technologies.

I personally have asked my classes, during class time, what changes can I make that you would want in future classes. Every time I show a video I ask them if I should show it to future classes, we have axed several videos LOL. They have made my classes better. They have said they really don't want to do any kind of "interactive game" that is nothing but "books with moving pictures." They are the ones that said Darfur is Dying is only a good tool when coupled with the film, "The Devil Came on Horseback" so they can see the relevance of the game, like why children are the ones that go for water.

I do encourage lurkers, I have sent the link to this mooc to all the social science instructors at FRCC and offered to explain anything or demonstrate.


I am an only child who grew up very isolated with grandparents in eastern Colorado, didn't go to school till second grade. So learned at an early age to entertain myself and embrace new ideas. . . I know for some being that "Voice in the Wilderness" may be uncomfortable, but it isn't really because soon others will join you if you have a good idea. It takes time!

The old adage that "If you have a good product, the world will beat a path to your door," is still valid -- but time moves quicker, or seems to now. We have a good product, and although the path isn't beaten down and visible to everyone, there is a path and we have placed nice little markers to help them find us. This mooc is such a marker. It just takes time and focus. We are slow to change simply because our product really can't be returned for a refund, consumers really don't push us to build a better product [they simply withdraw or move on]. We have to push ourselves.

I am reminded of one of my favorite quotes, from Machiavelli, from The Prince:

“He who introduces it (a new idea or scheme) has all those who profit from the old order as his enemies; and he has only lukewarm allies in all those who might profit from the new.”

It takes a long time to get something as vast and entrenched, as education's traditional methods, to embrace a radical change, and, we are suggesting and supporting a radical change to meet the future needs of our students.
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