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#7544281 Mar 18, 2013 at 02:26 PM
Curator
29 Posts
I love people and cherish knowledge.

Credentials: I have a Masters and Bachelors in Computer Science. I obtained the Masters at Colorado Technical University.

I am the Chairperson of the Mentor Program in my department at work. We match up those who want to share technology knowledge and those who wish to receive it. We informally call people Instructors and Students although we're all software developers. We set up goals, track how much time is involved and publish results.

We have applied game mechanics (Gamification) to our Mentor Program, scores. This has been our most successful quarter and satisfaction seems up.

The types of games in mind would have to be deployable either via web browser, possibly mobile devices although I would have to check who has them and what kinds, or pen + paper. :)

I have also been a Software Developer for many years. Currently, I write Java and iOS (iPhone and iPad) applications for our company.

I have a new hope that games, game thinking and game mechanics are getting accepted as learning/motivational tools. The hope began with watching Jane McGonigal's TED talk, The game that can give you 10 extra years of life.

Social Media:

For bookmarks, I like using http://www.pearltrees.com/finneycanhelp although I used to use diigo and think it's cool. 8)

I love twitter, @finneycanhelp Facebook is ok: finneycanhelp. I like google+: finneycanhelp (plus.google.com). Flickr: finneycanhelp

Blog: http://smilingfinney.blogspot.com/ where you can read my latest post of "Gamification Meets Technology Mentor Program"

So, how can I help you? :)

--
Michael Finney - "Always Striving To Serve You Better Every Day"
www.SmilingSoftwareSolutions.com
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#7544887 Mar 18, 2013 at 04:11 PM
Artisan
58 Posts
Like your classroom use of gamification (read your blog). I have been trying to work out how to gamify my classes and that's one of the reasons I joined this MOOC.
To each his own game ;)
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#7550615 Mar 19, 2013 at 05:50 PM
Guides
561 Posts
#7544281 finneycanhelp wrote:

I love people and cherish knowledge.

I love twitter, @finneycanhelp Facebook is ok: finneycanhelp. I like google+: finneycanhelp (plus.google.com). Flickr: finneycanhelp

Blog: http://smilingfinney.blogspot.com/ where you can read my latest post of "Gamification Meets Technology Mentor Program"

So, how can I help you? :)



I really like the way you have made your blog something that is not only timely but understandable, many of our MOOCers are new to gamification and frankly, it is a little scary, as fast as it is moving I have to admit sometimes it scares me too. It is nice to see that practical application. I do intend to put more badges and leveling up into my classes starting in the fall, I only have badges in one class this semester. Glad to welcome you to our MOOC.
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#7572510 Mar 24, 2013 at 08:23 AM
Curator
29 Posts
#7544887 Lleshrad wrote:

Like your classroom use of gamification (read your blog). I have been trying to work out how to gamify my classes and that's one of the reasons I joined this MOOC.



Thanks! :)

A secret to success is to gradually introduce Gamificiation into your situation a bit at a time. If you can take something you are currently measuring, apply a game mechanic, and then look at the results, it's satisfying and fun!
--
Michael Finney - "Always Striving To Serve You Better Every Day"
www.SmilingSoftwareSolutions.com
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#7572532 Mar 24, 2013 at 08:29 AM
Curator
29 Posts
#7550615 grasshopper98 wrote:



I really like the way you have made your blog something that is not only timely but understandable, many of our MOOCers are new to gamification and frankly, it is a little scary, as fast as it is moving I have to admit sometimes it scares me too. It is nice to see that practical application. I do intend to put more badges and leveling up into my classes starting in the fall, I only have badges in one class this semester. Glad to welcome you to our MOOC.



Thanks for the welcome! Yes, Gamification can be scary and exciting. To be poetic, we're entering a cave where there is gold, yet the path is not well lit in some spots.

The good news is that the Gamification community recognizes the concerns and embraces them by starting up a discussion around the ethical application of Gamificiation.

--
Michael Finney - "Always Striving To Serve You Better Every Day"
www.SmilingSoftwareSolutions.com
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#7584473 Mar 26, 2013 at 04:45 PM
Consigliere
18 Posts
Hello Finneycanhelp! *chuckles* It is so very grand to see you here!

In one of our classes, you introduced me to There's development team after I shared highlights from my virtual environment research during 1995-97.

While I wandered over to Second Life and only modestly dabbed at There (as I preferred greater content control and wanted my students to create projects, games and simulations), I will never forget our wonderful class sessions and discussions!

It is great to see you! *peers and grins*

It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#7584527 Mar 26, 2013 at 04:52 PM
Consigliere
18 Posts
#7544887 Lleshrad wrote:

Like your classroom use of gamification (read your blog). I have been trying to work out how to gamify my classes and that's one of the reasons I joined this MOOC.



One way to think of it is to reflect on how we gamify life. As we drive to school, many of try to improve on our previous times, shaving minutes off the trip to "win."

I think of these as mini games (the concept of a little game within a game), and we have a collection of them that we use to measure our performance. They are not exciting games, mind you, but they pepper our existence.

But then, for me, this is the game of life, and we can all be winners in it. *grins*

I once tested this concept quite simply by transforming my points in a course to gold. My 30 students in this blended online course were receiving pieces of gold instead of points, and each week, their stature grew as they played the game (completed online course activities).

What was interesting is that students were participating early and with better quality work. When the course ended, several of them kept writing me by email, wanting more quests.

Online courses most often close at the end of a term, and so do the quests (assignments). *chuckles* The use of metaphor and attaining greater stature and reputation has an engaging effect, and this was only a simple test of how to transform and leverage a course into a game-based culture.
It is only with the heart that one can see clearly.
What is essential is invisible to the eyes.

Antoine de Sainte-Exupery
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#7592783 Mar 28, 2013 at 10:33 AM
Guides
561 Posts
#7584527 Lyrlobo wrote:

[quote_post7544887 user=1005121]
I once tested this concept quite simply by transforming my points in a course to gold. My 30 students in this blended online course were receiving pieces of gold instead of points, and each week, their stature grew as they played the game (completed online course activities).

What was interesting is that students were participating early and with better quality work. When the course ended, several of them kept writing me by email, wanting more quests.

Online courses most often close at the end of a term, and so do the quests (assignments). *chuckles* The use of metaphor and attaining greater stature and reputation has an engaging effect, and this was only a simple test of how to transform and leverage a course into a game-based culture.



I haven't tried the gold yet, but I have noticed that since I added a "First Poster" award for discussions (the bane of online students) that the posts are earlier and better quality. All they get is the badge below their post and a note from me in my reply to them about "Congratulations you have won the First Poster award, there are no points only bragging rights and my undying gratitude for getting this discussion active." and the badge below my answer. I have found that the students who end up getting these awards are more likely to connect with me on Facebooik, and stay connected. No scientific study, just a cultural anthropologist's observation. So there is something I can't codify regarding getting an award and a desire to stay connected in social media. Any suggestions on why this is happening?

I have also found that in the new D2L (our online shell) you can set the discussions so they can't see other's posts or reply without first putting in their own reply to the question. The goal of course is to make sure students don't wait and see what other's post and then not study the material and just make an answer off of other's answers. The feedback is they don't like this, I did ask my hybrid about it and told them that if I saw that some people were "sacking out to do their answer" I would institute that freeze They filed early and interesting answers to avoid the freeze. They like the real time posting to follow the ideas of others and expand, not copy them. What do you think?

All in all an interesting concept, they want the interaction and it seems to make their contributions stronger. I have been told by students that in classes where the freeze is instituted there is less variation in answers. Have no proof...
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#7617271 Apr 02, 2013 at 09:41 PM
Initiate
4 Posts
Love the instructor/student setup at your place or work. We call it transformational leadership. What a great way to share knowledge and responsibility.
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#7659327 Apr 11, 2013 at 10:51 AM · Edited over 8 years ago
Guides
561 Posts
#7584527 Lyrlobo wrote:

#7544887 Lleshrad wrote:

Like your classroom use of gamification (read your blog). I have been trying to work out how to gamify my classes and that's one of the reasons I joined this MOOC.




I once tested this concept quite simply by transforming my points in a course to gold. My 30 students in this blended online course were receiving pieces of gold instead of points, and each week, their stature grew as they played the game (completed online course activities).

What was interesting is that students were participating early and with better quality work. When the course ended, several of them kept writing me by email, wanting more quests.

Online courses most often close at the end of a term, and so do the quests (assignments). *chuckles* The use of metaphor and attaining greater stature and reputation has an engaging effect, and this was only a simple test of how to transform and leverage a course into a game-based culture.


Hi @ LyrLobo, I am using badging in my Anthropology of Religion class [F2F] and also a "badge" in my hybrid and online. It is amazing what something that doesn't carry "points" for example will encourage.

The "badge" in the hybrid and online right now is simply a "first place blue ribbon" that I put at the end of my answer to their post in the discussion. I am having a fantastic designer make a real badge for me. Generally at the top of my reply there is something like, "Congratulations you are the first poster in the discussion, you receive nothing but this public recognition, delightful badge, and, my undying gratitude for helping us all get the discussion going!" I have had students stay up until 12:01 AM to get that badge. I run two discussions simultaneously and you can only win one per module so there are two chances.

The Anthropology of Religion class [F2F] has the students creating their own religion. The quality of the outlines I received this week are close to publishable, the reason? Five students will receive "Religion Creation" badge and their religions will be presented to the class. The second project is ethnographic. All the students choose one of those five badge-winning religions and look at it from an ethnographic point of view, they do a field study. Five of those entries will receive a "Ethnography of Religion" badge. I will then do college letter head, write a letter, showing the badges they have won, describe what they had to do to get it. They can show this to future college or employers to show they did something above getting a grade. I have convinced a fantastic designer to make the badges for me.

I hope that I can also get the college to fund me to make maybe ten decal badges of their religious symbols or their badges that they can keep or give to friends. My son, who is also an anthropologist, but builds race and custom cars, and is a gamer, said that it is important that the games go from computer to real life and back again. He suggested the decals.

I created a religion in order to write an outline as an example for them, they loved the fact that the instructor did the project. Just for fun, here is my symbol, my religion is ANTHROLOGY, of course, the premise is that this religion can re-integrate your conscious and subconscious, that your brain use to be one but evolution has divided it.


Anthrology Symbol by grasshopper98, on Flickr

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