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#7561761 Mar 21, 2013 at 06:32 PM
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14 Posts
Hi - My name is Brooke Petrucelli - going by Xenaqueen for my username. I am an elementary technology teacher. Games in Education is something I truly believe in and have a passion for. I recently spoke at our New Hampshire technology conference on game sites for the common core.

I usually do not go a day without playing something but have yet to venture into WoW. I have lost days to Riven, Myst, Obilvion and Skyrim. While making dinner, - I will play city building games, world mosaics, hidden object - you name it.

I see the positive effect that games have on my K-4th graders. But my own personal quest is to get gaming to be a serious part of the curriculum.

My quest for this course is to hear the ideas of like minded people, experience a MOOC (cool), and just keep learning about games.
A skilled teacher knows that technology implementations won't have any impact as long as you try and retrofit them on to outdated teaching methods. Only when combined with the creativity and ingenuity of dedicated teachers can technology have a truly disruptive and transformative effect. "

by Sam Gliksman
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#7562692 Mar 21, 2013 at 10:51 PM
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38 Posts
ooo you and I sound like kindred spirits. I teach K-5 technology.

~Neemana
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#7575231 Mar 24, 2013 at 09:03 PM
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11 Posts
Greetings fellow New Englander. Would you be willing to share the game sites for the Common Core? It's just the sort of thing I'd like to include in a presentation to our school admins in support of incorporating gbl. I'd love to discuss what you're currently doing with your K-4 graders. The more I learn about Minecraft the more excited I am about bringing Minecraft Edu in. I think it would have to start as an after-school offering in order to gain traction.
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#7575307 Mar 24, 2013 at 09:30 PM
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6 Posts
#7561761 xenaqueen wrote:

A skilled teacher knows that technology implementations won't have any impact as long as you try and retrofit them on to outdated teaching methods. Only when combined with the creativity and ingenuity of dedicated teachers can technology have a truly disruptive and transformative effect. "

by Sam Gliksman



Very Nice signature, XQ.... :-)

I'm another New Englander, and glad to hear games in the classroom are alive and well north of the border. Not sure what your plans for the summer are, but you should consider checking out: http://education.mit.edu/starlogo-tng/support/workshops/intro2013 - It's a bit higher level than Scratch, but is a neat tool for building your own 3-d games and simulations with little-to-no programming experience before jumping in.
Josh Sheldon
MIT Scheller Teacher Ed. Program/Education Arcade
MIT Center for Mobile Learning
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#7582496 Mar 26, 2013 at 10:10 AM
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561 Posts
#7561761 xenaqueen wrote:

Hi - My name is Brooke Petrucelli - going by Xenaqueen for my username. I am an elementary technology teacher. Games in Education is something I truly believe in and have a passion for. I recently spoke at our New Hampshire technology conference on game sites for the common core.

I usually do not go a day without playing something but have yet to venture into WoW. I have lost days to Riven, Myst, Obilvion and Skyrim. While making dinner, - I will play city building games, world mosaics, hidden object - you name it.

I see the positive effect that games have on my K-4th graders. But my own personal quest is to get gaming to be a serious part of the curriculum.

My quest for this course is to hear the ideas of like minded people, experience a MOOC (cool), and just keep learning about games.



I love the avatar, when Zena was on TV you couldn't keep all the women in my family away from the set. Even commercial quality Halloween costume followed for my daughter-in-law and granddaughter, complete with reproduction weapons from the best swordmaker in the USA (family friend)... you could carry real things back then. I expect that you will have that will and enthusiasm for gamification. I think that it is easier to find games for K-6 than college, it is that "college is serious" that gets in our way. Glad to see you in the mooc!
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