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#7565088 Mar 22, 2013 at 01:11 PM
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My experience with games has been solely through watching my son play many varieties of violent shoot 'em up/blood-quest adventures over his shoulder. Many times, I have had to focus on one corner of the screen because the activity gave me vertigo. I h ave made him tell me what the purpose or objective of the game is, so that I could try to appreciate it from an intellectual standpoint.
Most of the time, the objective is to kill as many of the 'enemy' as possible or to wipe out some supply tower or village for points. I see the thrill of the pursuit and the strategizing that flashes across my son's face as he is not deterred by defeat but rather is fueled by determination to figure out a better way of accomplishing the game's objective.

I am wary at best about what lies ahead here, but I do get that if played 'right,' games can teach important lessons.
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#7565736 Mar 22, 2013 at 03:33 PM
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#7565088 Buffalo1985 wrote:

My experience with games has been solely through watching my son play many varieties of violent shoot 'em up/blood-quest adventures over his shoulder. Many times, I have had to focus on one corner of the screen because the activity gave me vertigo. I h ave made him tell me what the purpose or objective of the game is, so that I could try to appreciate it from an intellectual standpoint.
Most of the time, the objective is to kill as many of the 'enemy' as possible or to wipe out some supply tower or village for points. I see the thrill of the pursuit and the strategizing that flashes across my son's face as he is not deterred by defeat but rather is fueled by determination to figure out a better way of accomplishing the game's objective.

I am wary at best about what lies ahead here, but I do get that if played 'right,' games can teach important lessons.



There is quite a bit written about what skills games teach, I certainly believe it is strategy, conservation of resources, increased acquisition of tools/objects and to recognize whether an object/tool is worth the time and effort to get it. It also teaches mapping, 3-D visualization and hand/eye coordination. Games do teach us to think of more than one method of achieving a goal.

I think with games, if you remember how you learned more in K-12 than college as gamification is relatively new to main-stream college, you will remember something you learned that involved a challenge, a game, something to solve, etc. We really play games all our lives but we just don't think of it in those terms. Figuring out how to get to a destination if there is a road block and not lose any time is really a game in itself and we have all played that one! You will find a lot to do here and I look forward to your participation
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#7572693 Mar 24, 2013 at 09:17 AM
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29 Posts
Extremely violent games also do not work for me. :) Yes, we have to dig a little beyond those things to get to the true silver and gold.

The good news is that there are people out there who are striving to create environments based on learning within a game-like framework.
--
Michael Finney - "Always Striving To Serve You Better Every Day"
www.SmilingSoftwareSolutions.com
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#7575275 Mar 24, 2013 at 09:17 PM
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I'll bet many in this MOOC are here to support educational game design that delivers all the benefits of gaming; strategizing, managing resources, and pursuing mastery, without the blood and guts!
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#7792757 May 08, 2013 at 12:32 AM · Edited over 8 years ago
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I'm really want to do such a thing.

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