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#7595960 Mar 29, 2013 at 12:05 AM
Artisan
58 Posts
I was so happy to see these points in the Horizon report:

The average MMO gamer spends 10-15 hours per week conducting online research related to the game.

Digital and communication literacy goes hand in hand with game play.

Not only do these statements give me a strong position for introducing gaming into my classroom. It also gives me a new way to get at the importance of research / research processes with my students !

To each his own game ;)
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#7598176 Mar 29, 2013 at 12:56 PM
Guild Officer
354 Posts
As a gamer, I agree with number of hours doing research. The metagame as defined by Jim Gee is hugely important. A gamer if they are playing MMORPGs like World of Warcraft, Guild Wars, EVEOnline or LOTRO or Sandbox games like Minecraft are spending time researching text based forums, watching videos on YouTube, or viewing livestream gameplay for research on how to optimize their gameplay or building inworld. It does take the kind of new media literacy skills that are described in [url=http://digitallearning.macfound.org/atf/cf/%7B7E45C7E0-A3E0-4B89-AC9C-E807E1B0AE4E%7D/JENKINS_WHITE_PAPER.PDF]Confronting the Challenges of Participatory Culture:Media Education for the
21st Century[/url] At my college, we used this paper to help inform us when we wrote the objectives for information and technology literacy. In this we emphasized transmedia, the ability to navigate across multiple forms of media, filter the information and be able to judge what information was credible and useful.

John Seeley Brown calls it the Gamer Disposition. In the summer, we're dividing the Games MOOC into two parts. This will be the focus on Part 1 in June - the Gamer Disposition and MMORPGs.

The other great thing about gamers doing this research is that they share the learning. You'll find it in wikis, websites, forums, livestreaming of gameplay and videos.

For instance, the guild officers in Inevitable Betrayal are doing a weekly webinar on "Macro Magic (And Add-ons) this Saturday. This webinar will talk about how to make commands inside the game and also add-ons or mods that other players have made.

I think it would be very interesting to setup an information search for students the way a gamer looks for information. It could be a discussion of how many different sources, why sources they found are credible, cross-checking and then going in attempting the solution to see if it works. Then - going through and doing it again.




twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#7599009 Mar 29, 2013 at 04:45 PM · Edited over 6 years ago
Guides
561 Posts
@Kae I certainly look forward to summer, and what we have in store. As you stated. "In the summer, we're dividing the Games MOOC into two parts. This will be the focus on Part 1 in June - the Gamer Disposition and MMORPGs." I know that certain traits and skills are inherent in game play. Those skills are transferable into real world situations, especially in business and organizational development. There is so much cooperative and supportive behavior in the Guilds of the MMORPG games, as well as commitment to the group's being robust and healthy and well-respected by others.

I look forward to further exploring the implementation of that kind of cooperation and support between students in my classroom. It will be a little more more difficult to do, I think, in college classes. The skills learned in MMORPG games are generally not learned in the short time of a college class.

@Kae "The other great thing about gamers doing this research is that they share the learning. You'll find it in wikis, websites, forums, livestreaming of gameplay and videos." I am trying to implement this with having my social science classes (Anthro, etc.) in a computer room, right now we do get a lot of discussions on just someone looking up something or I ask them to research and we share. We do have a place that students can load into the class shell links to outside research they may have found, but it isn't systematically stored nor does it stay available after the semester is over. Hmm you gave more to think about.


I want to explore how we can offer and guide students in these shorter time periods. WE have students for 1 hour and 10 minutes twice a week for 15 weeks, I think that ends up being 39 hours. With course competencies and evaluations of achievement time is always a problem. I generally have about 1/2 of any class having MMORPG or ONline game experience so there is that learning curve to deal with.

Here is an obscure fact for you all to think about on Friday afternoon:I have observed that in four semesters, 70% of the "gamers" sit on the right side of the room [from where I see them in the front] can anyone explain that? In a couple of classes 100% of the gamers were on that right side. Now that is what anthropologists do, we look at every little thing people do and try to figure out what is the functionality. When I ask them why did they sit where they sat, they say "I always sit on this side." (Right brain - Left Brain?) Give me your best guess.

I am open for suggestions.
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#7600326 Mar 30, 2013 at 12:19 AM
Artisan
58 Posts
@kae " Ithink it would be very interesting to setup an information search for students the way a gamer looks for information. It could be a discussion of how many different sources, why sources they found are credible, cross-checking and then going in attempting the solution to see if it works. Then - going through and doing it again."

This is a really good idea. I could incorporate it into my website evaluation lessons & discuss why someone who would not be a credible resource for some things may be for others. nd correlate how conducting research for a gaming can be done using the same research processes that I teach & may then yield better results.

I teach information literacy, digital literacy, 21st century (mid 21st century skills as the case may be trying to stay ahead of the curve), use of techology to students as well as technology integration to faculty. Theses are such important skills in this day & age.

@grasshopper Time constraints in teaching are something we all deal with. I see students once a week for between 40-55 minutes depending on the grade level in that class I must "lecture", do a reinforcing activity, and allow time for students to find then check out books for their independent learning . Because of this, I am looking at "flipping" my classroom (library).

I know you all probably know what flipping is but here's a link anyway- Flipping the classroom
To each his own game ;)
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#7603359 Mar 30, 2013 at 07:44 PM · Edited over 6 years ago
Initiate
35 Posts
I was surprised that attention wasn't called to the 2012 K-12 report, in which Augmented Reality got some great coverage (4-5 years away).

Here's a good link from that:

go.nmc.org/getti
Latin Teacher
magisterp.com
MOOC III Week 2 Artisan
MOOC III Week 4 Collabrateur
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#7607155 Mar 31, 2013 at 07:23 PM
Artisan
58 Posts
@magisterp Thanks for the links. Will check them out!
To each his own game ;)
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