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#7643614 Apr 08, 2013 at 01:12 PM · Edited 6 years ago
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Jane McGonigal's Find the Future - Scavenger Hunt or ARG?

So what really are the components of a scavenger hunt v. an ARG?
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#7645108 Apr 08, 2013 at 05:45 PM · Edited 6 years ago
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I would have to go with an ARG, because in this game you generally are picking one quest or more quests and you are given the location to go and review information with the goal being to write about it.

A scavenger hunt does require you to find the object on your own without any clues or directions. (list of ten things for example, easy to get ones and odd ones and time limit).

I wish I had been lucky enough to be one of the original players in 2011, but due to the creative mind of Jane, we can continue to play it in the New York Library or Online. If you are in the library I would go more with Augmented Reality, but online it could be more Mediated Reality, because my view is modified to fit the parameters of the game. Alas, I am low man/woman/grasshopper on the totem pole so to speak (leader board) This could even get me interested in topics that I have no basic interest in pursuing, ah, the goal of gamification, make learning fun. When you apply to get an account, it does suggest/ask you what you will be doing in 2021 (ten years from the game introduction). Makes one think. Here is what a leader board looks like in the game, it really isn't in the scavenger hunt definition, although they are collecting quests, they are not collecting objects.


find the future by grasshopper98, on Flickr
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#7645339 Apr 08, 2013 at 06:39 PM
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My opinion is that it is an ARG. A scavenger hunt is typically significantly more simple - "find these items and you win!" Whereas Find the Future appears to be significantly broader and more complex.
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#7650031 Apr 09, 2013 at 03:37 PM
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@Hawkye, i agree ARG. I was talking to my son who is also an anthropologist, but not in education, about ARG and his point was that to keep gamers (he is one too) that you must keep people interested in the game, that you must certainly have leveling up and badges or rewards, but that you must go from the virtual world to the real world and back again, back and forth, he mentioned the "urban archaeology" that I do where my students go to auctions and look through what is for sale, we discuss what we have found, look them up on mobile, post them in online discussion shells, etc. That it is important to have a competition of some kind in addition to the group effort. I am giving that though. I am adding prizes for the individual finds, (say, the first that finds something from a decade) but also that there is something for those who combine their find is teams who receive a team reward. Just a video game is a two dimensional representation of a three dimensional world, there maybe three dimensional controls to control the two dimensional screen. An example would be a race game, in a real stock car race, you are surrounded by the car, the sounds, the sounds of the engine, the bumps, the track, the changing conditions of the track, the sound in your ear from the spotter, the smells, all your senses are in play. "This is lost in video game (we don't have Smell-0-Vision for example). So for an ARG to be successful you need the five sensory input interacting with the technological presentations. This back and forth should be seamless. In case you are too young to remember Smell-O-Vision or Aromarama, it did exist in movie theaters in the 1950s. Disney World and Disneyland does currently use fragrance releases. So I guess you could say Smell-O-Vision was a leader in Augmented Reality, eh?
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#7651033 Apr 09, 2013 at 07:08 PM
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Wow, and here I was thinking Smell-O-Vision was nothing more than a bad joke! It's a good point though - in order for there to be "complete" immersion in the game, there needs to be full sensory stimulus. In an ARG where it really is just one small step away from being total reality (it does take place in our world), it does make such a thing much easier to accomplish.

To be honest, though, I'm a bit glad I don't have to experience all the smells of the medieval age when I'm playing something like Dark Age of Camelot...
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#7654043 Apr 10, 2013 at 10:57 AM
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@ Hawkye, Here is where my life-history (older than you) helps. When those didn't work I think it was John Waters that re-produced one of his films, it may have been Pink Flamingos, and had a little "scratch and sniff" card with ten little number boxes, when the film had "1" on the screen somewhere, you scratched "1," and so on. That didn't work either, but it did solve the problem of people in the balcony smelling the sprayed scent long after the scene that it matched was over. There was also no way to clear the theater of smell #1 when smell #2 was sprayed. The mechanism for spraying made a lot of noise too. Now after that history lesson is over, let's think...

How much is really missing from sensory input in computer games, the two dimensional representation of three dimensional worlds, if we have five senses, then really only two hearing and sight. There is touch but it is not "within the game" and smell and taste are absent. Once we have an ARG, or even a scavenger hunt that is in reality as well as technology assisted, we can add the two other elements. Let me give you an example:

Let's say that you want to have students experience the Chicano/a (Hispanic) culture of Longmont, CO. With the Augmented reality you could have an assignment to go stand in front of a building on main street, you could look in, the smart device you have would automatically start a video showing you inside the store and the line 2/3 back where the floor boards go across. You could hear an interview of a woman who at 4 yeas of age in the 1950s remembers it is a shoe store, and that Mexican Americans had to go in the back and not cross that line or the would not be served [true story]. If had them walk down the alley they could imagine how they would feel. Have them touch the back door... So no smell yet, send them to Santiago's Mexican Restaurant, they would then see a video or slide show or the owner talking about the ingredients and the history of a particular dish, get the dish served to you and thus you have covered all five senses. Well, it is an idea.

You could also do this with other culture areas, example the five story pagoda in a park in Longmont, would interface with the Japanese in this area, then on to the Japanese Buddhist temple and experience a ceremony, all backed up with streams of knowledge for you through smart media, or Google glasses.

What do you think about Augmented Reality adding touch, smell and taste? Are they important for this process, would it teach more on a personal basis?
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#7654430 Apr 10, 2013 at 12:02 PM
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#7645339 Hawkye wrote:

My opinion is that it is an ARG. A scavenger hunt is typically significantly more simple - "find these items and you win!" Whereas Find the Future appears to be significantly broader and more complex.



What is the complex and broader components that distinguish it beyond a typical scavenger hunt?

Wikipedia's Definition:
An alternate reality game (ARG) is an interactive narrative that uses the real world as a platform and uses transmedia storytelling to deliver a story that may be altered by participants' ideas or actions.

Scavenger hunts tend to be void of the narrative as you mentioned. It seems more like a checklist of items or events to complete. I like to think of an ARG as the narrative that connects the scavenger hunt - it gives meaning behind each component.

I was thinking about a game in my High School music class that was a time machine powered by classical music. The computer would give you hints about dates, people, periods and you had to find the classical piece that would then power the time machine to listen to the concert of the composer. As I remember the graphics were very 1995ish, but I think the idea was very ARG in that the narrative powered the scavenger hunt and why we wanted to find the information.
"A game is a problem-solving activity, approached with a playful attitude."
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#7654676 Apr 10, 2013 at 12:42 PM · Edited 6 years ago
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@Sam G, You are correct you can have an online scavenger hunt, I would say that your music "scavenger hunt" was really more than the "find the items" it required unlocking in order to locate the item, if I read you correctly. I think the purer definition of a scavenger hunt is a list and you simply go collect items on the list and bring them to a central location (computer scavenger hunt I would assume you prove you found the item with the link or jpg or something.)

However your bring up a good point, that is how could you use an Augmented Reality to expand the scavenger hunt, say, go to a GPS location, take a picture of the QR code, go to that website, and sign in on your "page/list" that this had been located.

You could do it with clues, as an example, an item could be described as, " Japanese American have a strong history in the Longmont, CO community. Locate the five story pagoda, using the QR code there, go to the website to locate another building (you wouldn't tell them but it would be the Buddhist Temple) go there and identify yourself and you will receive an item to bring to class [I am assuming that this is a face-to-face class] at the temple the student would be given a stick of incense and a red string. They would be asked in class to explain the ritualistic significance of both and how they were used. They could meet with their team there to pool their knowledge.

Would this fit your definition of a scavenger hunt or would it be augmented reality or a hybrid of the two distinct activities?
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#7656127 Apr 10, 2013 at 05:08 PM
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#7654430 Sam G wrote:


What is the complex and broader components that distinguish it beyond a typical scavenger hunt?



Well, once you add a narrative to it, it ceases to be a scavenger hunt and begins to be a story-driven game (personal opinion.) It also adds the idea of powerups for each item. Beyond that, simply finding the items isn't enough. After the items are found, "they'll be assigned the writing part of the quest. They'll then submit their work to the game's Web site." The end goal of the game was to collaborate on a book. This encourges creativity well beyond a piece of paper that says "find the following ten items."
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#7658842 Apr 11, 2013 at 08:37 AM
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#7643614 kae wrote:

Jane McGonigal's Find the Future - Scavenger Hunt or ARG?



Definitely ARG. After creating a character, I soon discovered that one of Jane's mechanics reminded me of Tom Chatfield's idea of "opening boxes." Questing in Find the Future (i.e. looking at summaries of source documents) earns "powers" which, besides being requirements for certain achievements, are not really needed to play the game at all (but we WANT to collect them to earn the achievements, even if the achievements stay in this Alternate Reality).

Badges are one example of achievements that we can offer our students. Any other suggestions?


Boxes - Tom Chatfield by MagisterMrP, on Flickr


Boxes - Tom Chatfield by MagisterMrP, on Flickr
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#7659693 Apr 11, 2013 at 12:09 PM · Edited 6 years ago
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#7658842 MagisterP wrote:

#7643614 kae wrote:

Jane McGonigal's Find the Future - Scavenger Hunt or ARG?



Definitely ARG. After creating a character, I soon discovered that one of Jane's mechanics reminded me of Tom Chatfield's idea of "opening boxes." Questing in Find the Future (i.e. looking at summaries of source documents) earns "powers" which, besides being requirements for certain achievements, are not really needed to play the game at all (but we WANT to collect them to earn the achievements, even if the achievements stay in this Alternate Reality).

Badges are one example of achievements that we can offer our students. Any other suggestions?

I went back and looked at Tom Chatfield's TED video, his seven reason are
1. Experience bars measuring progress
2. Multiple long and short term goals
3. Reward for effort
4. Feedback, frequent and clear feedback
5. An element of uncertainty
6. Windows of enhanced attention
7. Other people
I really was interested in his explanations, and when he talked about experience bars, it got me thinking about how we plan and manage our classes. I divide my classes into four tests, and a project with four parts, other may use only a FINAL for the grade, or a mid-term and a final. In my ANT 225 class this time, I broke it to weekly tests over chapters/classroom activities and then a four part project. The interest in that class seems higher. It is definitely giving a (1) experience bar. I expect I will modify my other classes in the Fall to focus on other points. I do use "easter eggs" embedded in my syllabus.

I looked at the comments regarding the TED talk and two points caught my interest, first, that we may actually be talking about classic Behavioralism (Skinner) and second, that there may be "punishment by rewards," and there is a good article by the author, Ron Brandt, here is a link to the PDF of an interview with him. Punishment by Rewards. I always like to look at the possible downsides. Brandt talks about the "three Cs" which are:
1. Content
2. Community
3. Choice

In answer to your question, I think more quizzes, shorter ones, that are continuous throughout the semester [consider the points "gold" that can be collected to "buy a grade." I may even get fake gold coins and actually hand them out and have a leader board on the wall, with their avatar names. At the end of the semester they would buy a grade. They might be able to buy other items, like an excuse for a not coming to class, or something else. It might keep my students more engaged, get them into the "rhythm" of the class. I am not exactly sure how to implement (5) and (6) any suggestions?
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#7660375 Apr 11, 2013 at 02:30 PM · Edited 6 years ago
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#7659693 grasshopper98 wrote:


In answer to your question, I think more quizzes, shorter ones, that are continuous throughout the semester [consider the points "gold" that can be collected to "buy a grade." I may even get fake gold coins and actually hand them out and have a leader board on the wall, with their avatar names. At the end of the semester they would buy a grade. They might be able to buy other items, like an excuse for a not coming to class, or something else. It might keep my students more engaged, get them into the "rhythm" of the class. I am not exactly sure how to implement (5) and (6) any suggestions?



I am trying to find out how to articulate how I feel about this, so the following may appear quite harsh, however, it is important to be transparent within a learning community such as this...

In my post, I was thinking more in terms of "achievements" that would motivate students to do more work (which eventually gets them their grade) and not actual items that are converted into grades, or allow them to bypass rules/procedures. Physical awards seem like a slippery slope as well...how is that different than giving different amounts of candy for grades? I was under the impression that extrinsic, material rewards were to be avoided in the realm of education. Also, why would we encourage students to miss a class? That seems like the wrong message to be sending.

If I offered badges in my classroom, I would not require students to complete X many quests in order to get an A...the difference here seems to be between recognition and evaluation. Instead, I am looking for a motivator within the game other than knowing that playing the game is part of a grade. I found that by playing Jane's game, I paid more attention to the artifacts because I knew they would help be gain achievements (which are basically Titles).
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#7661799 Apr 11, 2013 at 07:09 PM
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I've heard of a few different ways of having "achievements" in a game (ARG). If you're not interested in connecting the achievement to "hard currency" such as grades, there are still a few different methods:

Badges (of course) - These don't have to be digital. Little 1" button badges, if used sparingly, might work as acknowledgements of specific achievements.

XP/levels not related to grades - This could be plugged into an experience bar that grants students levels.

Titles - Depending on the age of the class, this could be fun. For a day, everyone in the class can call a particular person by their title (Lady Tracy) as an achieve.

Future pieces of the puzzle - By unlocking a specific achievement, a student holds information that will help their group in the future in whatever the ARG is. They become the "gatekeeper" of that knowledge and feel as if they are contributing to the group in a significant way.

Leaderboard - This is a board that lists who is currently leading the high scores. It could be difficult to do technically, though. And of course privacy is always a concern with student information.

I'm just brainstorming here, based on what I've seen before. Feel free to jump in!
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#7662042 Apr 11, 2013 at 08:22 PM
Artisan
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#7661799 Leedale wrote:

I've heard of a few different ways of having "achievements" in a game (ARG). If you're not interested in connecting the achievement to "hard currency" such as grades, there are still a few different methods:

Badges (of course) - These don't have to be digital. Little 1" button badges, if used sparingly, might work as acknowledgements of specific achievements.

XP/levels not related to grades - This could be plugged into an experience bar that grants students levels.

Titles - Depending on the age of the class, this could be fun. For a day, everyone in the class can call a particular person by their title (Lady Tracy) as an achieve.

Future pieces of the puzzle - By unlocking a specific achievement, a student holds information that will help their group in the future in whatever the ARG is. They become the "gatekeeper" of that knowledge and feel as if they are contributing to the group in a significant way.

Leaderboard - This is a board that lists who is currently leading the high scores. It could be difficult to do technically, though. And of course privacy is always a concern with student information.

I'm just brainstorming here, based on what I've seen before. Feel free to jump in!



I really like & agree with some of Leedale's suggestions here & think they would work.

My students love to be in top of leaderboards and will work hard to knock their fellow students off the top. The future knowledge piece would be great in an ongoing game that would be used throughout the year not just for a specific unit. Titles even work for grown ups as we can see by people striving to obtain title awards here on this MOOC. (I even blogged about my Artisan award lol) and the same applies to the badges that come with them. I am not so sure how to apply the xp bar piece. That may work just because students like to see where they are & how they are doing.

Maybe an added incentive could be coupons that they win/ earn like a free homework pass or something similar . Or maybe being able to add to the game in some way.
To each his own game ;)
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#7664925 Apr 12, 2013 at 11:30 AM
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I liked @LeeDale's idea of titles, I am not sure I like leader boards, however I am toying with what I woudl call a cross between gamification of my class and a behaviorist token economy. I know a lot about behavior modification and token economy, owned and operated a private prison and halfway house and used it. I am toying with literally giving out fake coinage (gold, silver, bronze) and then they can be used for future I guess I could have a leader board that is updated every week. I am going to do this in my SUMMER ANT 101 Cultural Anthropology class. Got to find those guinea pigs somewhere :)

Here is how I envision it working, and how it could be used in a cross between an ARG and a scavenger hunt: You could get tokens for self-guided field trip looking for cultural artifacts, and then spend them to get points to maximum on a test if you missed questions, like maybe two could be spent on a 20 question test. You could "buy an answer to a question" and you could coordinate with others to try to get a lot of test questions and answers in advance. That way they learn the material. I have not got this worked out yet but will work with our "Instructional Coach" out of our Larimer Campus at FRCC. You could get tokens for finding something from up to three decades, for example.

Just for Friday fun, here is an Animoto I made to get them interested in the Self-Guided Field Trip.


Animoto - Self Guided Field Trip
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#7670419 Apr 13, 2013 at 03:15 PM
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I have just been to the eLCC conference in Breckenridge for three days, got to read a lot of the forums in my "down time" and got to thinking about what everyone said about scavenger hunt v augmented reality. I needed to make up the time with my face-to-face students (three classes, two Cultural Anthropology and one Anthropology of Religion) they all have optional Bonus project of a self-guided field trip, so I decided to combine the classes and make an optional field trip to a local auction to search for "cultural artifacts." They can win GOLD (will have plastic gold coins to hand out) and other prizes, then there will be a prize for the class depositing the most gold in their class treasure box. It should be fun and even without prizes when I have done this before a lot show up. :) I had been thinking about this but thanks to all of you here I decided to expand it to include basically "gold farming" LOL

Here is the handout they will be getting:


FIELD TRIP URBAN ARCHAEOLOGY for MOOC by grasshopper98, on Flickr
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#7673717 Apr 14, 2013 at 11:14 AM
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#7659693 grasshopper98 wrote:



I looked at the comments regarding the TED talk and two points caught my interest, first, that we may actually be talking about classic Behavioralism (Skinner) and second, that there may be "punishment by rewards," and there is a good article by the author, Ron Brandt, here is a link to the PDF of an interview with him. Punishment by Rewards.



The Xbox Live Rewards Program is a great example of what I was thinking in terms of Rewards vs. Achievement in the digital/gaming realm. I am more of a fan of the in-game perks you can buy. Again, I think having students "purchase" a grade or bypass rules is the wrong message, but perhaps allowing them to purchase "gear" or something that enhances (rather than gives an ADVANTAGE to) gameplay might help students being more "invested" in their character, or role in the game.

On the topic of extrinsic motivation, the References page of Punishment by Rewards is amazing. You'll need access to JSTOR or databases in order to read most of the work, but for those without access, I found this an excerpt from a blog (Pedagogically Correct) that references one of the articles...

"A wildly popular example of this approach is the "Book It!" program established by Pizza Hut in 1985 and promoted in teachers' colleges to this day. This program, which has been used in 900,000 classrooms by 22 million students, offers children certificates for a personal pan pizza in exchange for meeting a monthly reading goal."

I think the research and commentary are encouraging us to separate the two...that achievements should not yield rewards...that a "title" earned after completing an achievement IS the reward. I've arrived at the following considerations...

1) Is the enjoyment is in the gameplay itself?
2) Is the motivation seeing a representation of progress (XP, Titles, Badges)?
3) Is the reward not having to sit through a "normal" boring class!?
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#7696637 Apr 18, 2013 at 04:58 PM
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#7660375 MagisterP wrote:

[quote_post7659693 user=768203]

If I offered badges in my classroom, I would not require students to complete X many quests in order to get an A...the difference here seems to be between recognition and evaluation. Instead, I am looking for a motivator within the game other than knowing that playing the game is part of a grade. I found that by playing Jane's game, I paid more attention to the artifacts because I knew they would help be gain achievements (which are basically Titles).



I am offering TWO badges in my classroom, it is Anthropology of Religion, they are creating their own religion, and the best five, in addition to receiving the usual points grade on a rubric, will receive a "Badge" and then the whole class will look at those five religions and write an ethnography of the religion (field study) and the five best will receive a "Badge" the badges carry no extra points but the will get a letterhead letter with those badges and an explanation of their outstanding work in the class above their letter grade to put with letters of employment, applications for college or scholarships. Here is one of the badges. I had a really creative friend do these for me. We may extend them into the real word by making some decals they can keep. I was amazed how hard my students worked to "win" one of these badges.


Creating a New Religion-1 (2) by grasshopper98, on Flickr
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