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#7922599 Jun 02, 2013 at 06:45 PM · Edited 5 years ago
Consigliere
26 Posts
Hello There!

This is your introduction. Every hero needs a quest to begin the journey and inspire them when they are in the grips of grinding. So our question for you is:

What is your Quest? or tell us why you have decided to join us in the exploration of games based learning?

Some things to include in your post are:

  • What level of Education are you thinking of using GBL for?
  • What types of games are you thinking about using?
  • How much experience do you have in gaming?
  • What are your expectations of GBL's affect on your students / clients?
  • Are you looking for collaborators?

Please also include your weapons of choice - weapons of mass social media. :D

Let us know your twitter handle, your blog and any other SoMe that you would like to share.

P.S. Please start a new thread when you introduce yourself – this makes it much easier for us to reply to you personally. Just click on the Introduce Yourself to the Guild! link at the top of this page and look for the gray "Add Thread" button!
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#7925873 Jun 03, 2013 at 12:33 PM
Initiate
6 Posts
I’m not much of a traditional gamer. I can work for weeks in trying to prove a mathematical theorem or making a computer program do what I want, but I can’t get engaged in trying to find the secrets for destroying monsters. And I much prefer cooperation to competition.

But my college students, who are preparing to be teachers at all levels, need to know about educational gaming––both games by others that they can use to teach and gamification of their own classrooms.

I have written, or helped write, some educational games. Odysseys2sense is an online forum that is something of a multi–player game for college students. It rewards critical thinking and creative problem solving in any content area. (This is the only “weapon of mass social media” I currently use in my courses.) A game called Salutes! allows my students to salute, anonymously, each others’ strengths. Other games teach individual mathematics topics. I’m working on a game of logical arguments. I prefer games in which players decide how successful they are rather than being judged through points or badges, but I don’t always follow that preference in games I design.

Besides learning more about games for learning, I enrolled in this MOOC because I’ve never taken a MOOC before. Most seem much more into information delivery than I want, but I’m intrigued by the constructivist possibilities of this one. I hope I can persevere through it without being derailed by all my other work.
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#7927075 Jun 03, 2013 at 04:03 PM
Guild Officer
73 Posts
I can't wait to see your contributions, Dr. Why! Your experience and application of games for critical thinking coupled with your preference for what seems to an expectation for your students to engage in self-relative reflection as a primary determiner of subject mastery (can we say... responsibility? ^_^) suggests to me that your approach to this cMOOC will be just as rewarding for the rest of us participating as you! Welcome. ^_^

#7925873 Dr. Why wrote:

I’m not much of a traditional gamer. I can work for weeks in trying to prove a mathematical theorem or making a computer program do what I want, but I can’t get engaged in trying to find the secrets for destroying monsters. And I much prefer cooperation to competition.

But my college students, who are preparing to be teachers at all levels, need to know about educational gaming––both games by others that they can use to teach and gamification of their own classrooms.

I have written, or helped write, some educational games. Odysseys2sense is an online forum that is something of a multi–player game for college students. It rewards critical thinking and creative problem solving in any content area. (This is the only “weapon of mass social media” I currently use in my courses.) A game called Salutes! allows my students to salute, anonymously, each others’ strengths. Other games teach individual mathematics topics. I’m working on a game of logical arguments. I prefer games in which players decide how successful they are rather than being judged through points or badges, but I don’t always follow that preference in games I design.

Besides learning more about games for learning, I enrolled in this MOOC because I’ve never taken a MOOC before. Most seem much more into information delivery than I want, but I’m intrigued by the constructivist possibilities of this one. I hope I can persevere through it without being derailed by all my other work.

Games Based Learning Mooc (gamesMOOC)
FRCC Humanities Instructor
The best combination of technophile and luddite

Twitter @ThereseEllis
Google+ therese.catherine.ellis@gmail.com
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#9405596 Apr 20, 2014 at 03:34 AM
177 Posts
What is your Quest? or tell us why you have decided to join us in the exploration of games.

Compressed Games Download

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#9456278 May 02, 2014 at 12:55 AM
177 Posts
What is your Quest? or tell us why you have decided to join us in the exploration of games based learning?

Download Full Pc Game

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