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#7939010 Jun 05, 2013 at 07:38 PM
Initiate
20 Posts
Think about the games you've played. What feature (you can only pick one) makes a player stay in or leave the game space?

The first edition of everquest was all about the social aspects, in fact very few quests were followed. Players 'camped' at locations where desirable items could be attained. The game devolved into a leveling experience, level up so you can go get good stuff.

Oblivion had amazing graphics. Players were drawn into quests, or could aimlessly travel and fight things. The space was what i liked, as an explorer player type I want to just keep going (an hope to not fall off the edge of the world).

But, back in the day the interactive adventure; books, MUDs, and role-playing games which had a 'live' story, were what I sought.

Social interactivity, geographic freedom, visual realism, storyline, leveling, and cool gear make good games; how can one port that into education?
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#7942584 Jun 06, 2013 at 01:06 PM
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110 Posts
The one thing that keeps people playing a game is agency. Players like to feel like they're in control of what's going on, and agency is how we make this happen.

I don't actually think it's difficult to port this to education, you just let the students choose what they're interested in and what they want to learn. There are many studies on how to do this, and how to structure these things to ensure learning is actually taking place. The difficult part is fitting this into our current educational model, which is far more interested in standardized testing than individual learning.
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#7945252 Jun 06, 2013 at 10:29 PM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
#7942584 blueAppaloosa wrote:

The one thing that keeps people playing a game is agency. Players like to feel like they're in control of what's going on, and agency is how we make this happen.



This reminds me of the idea of "epic meaning" from games where you feel like you're part of something important. With some games, you can be truly part of something important. Jane McGonigal discussed this in her Ted talk a couple of years ago:
http://youtu.be/dE1DuBesGYM

For me, the thing that keeps me in a game is a feeling of accomplishment. I need to feel like what I've done is something worth accomplishing. For me, discovery is part of that accomplishment. I'm strongly motivated to explore and experience to environments. (Obviously I'm not much of a PVP-er!) I remember an old game called the Morder: Depths of Dejenol that I was addicted to. I loved exploring new parts of the map. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mordor:_The_Depths_of_Dejenol)
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#7945628 Jun 07, 2013 at 12:53 AM
Initiate
20 Posts
thanks, those are food for thought.

they are many papers on learner centered methodologies that blue is talking about, but the challenge isn't devising this kind of system, the challenge is implementing the system. Getting current government (who control these decisions) to take a leap of faith in what these innovators suggest.

lee, McGonigal's doing something greater than oneself could well be part of incorporating a new model of education into the current system, or more usefully replacing the current model with something better.

allowing children (recording the parents wishes separately) to choose a school based on what interests them each september would satisfy both of your ideas; children's choice empowers the issues they want to learn while giving them some autonomy
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#9447769 Apr 30, 2014 at 12:57 AM
177 Posts
Players were drawn into quests, or could aimlessly travel and fight things.

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