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#8139590 Jul 15, 2013 at 01:35 PM
Guild Officer
343 Posts
We'd like you to also take a look at the xMOOC providers to see if there are any current or upcoming MOOCs that are game based or include immersive environments. (This is all to expand your PLN.)

Coursera

xED

Canvas

Udacity

So what did you find? Any less obvious ones that are intriguing?
twitter @kzenovka
www.center4edupunx
Games MOOC Instructor and Designer
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#8145219 Jul 16, 2013 at 01:42 PM · Edited 8 years ago
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561 Posts
Udemy has many game and game theory classes as well as hands-on courses on developing a game, some of the courses are free and some cost up to $99, mostly for the software that is needed to create the game. Udemy results of a search for "games"

Udemy has so many MOOCs on games that I encourage all our participants to explore and post their favorite.[

My personal choice choice is not immersive if you mean playing a game, but it is immersive if we have the term defined as being deeply involved, that you are absorbed by the subject matter and seek out other ways to experience the knowledge.

I do believe that anyone who has an intention of creating games for their classes, as opposed to "off the shelf" would benefit from understanding the underlying theory of games.

I was interested in the one on Game Theory 101 Game Theory 101 on Udemy as it has William Spanier as the instructor and over three thousand have taken the course. It seems to be self paces as I couldn't find a date. "He has been teaching game theory since 2009, and his lectures have been viewed millions of times around the world. In 2011, he wrote the textbook Game Theory 101, which became a best-seller."

Like all game theory classes after an introduction it plunges into "The Prisoner's Dilemma and Strict Dominance" as its topic, but quickly moves into more complex theory.
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#8146184 Jul 16, 2013 at 04:58 PM
Initiate
110 Posts
Be careful with the term "game theory". It's actually an economics term, used for describing rational decision making. It does loosely relate to games (the prisoner's dilemma and such), but is not the same as studying games.

That said, if you want a great free course on making games, I recommend Game Design Concepts by Ian Schreiber.
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#8150205 Jul 17, 2013 at 12:43 PM · Edited 8 years ago
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561 Posts
#8146184 blueAppaloosa wrote:

Be careful with the term "game theory". It's actually an economics term, used for describing rational decision making. It does loosely relate to games (the prisoner's dilemma and such), but is not the same as studying games.



Thank you for giving me the opportunity to clarify the terms "game theory" and "gamification" for our members, as there is a difference.

"Gamification" is defined as is the use of game thinking and game mechanics in a non-game context to engage users and solve problems. Those game mechanics are listed here, Game Mechanics. We here, are interested in using this concept to engage our students in more meaningful education.

"Game Theory" is defined as a study of strategic decision making. More formally, it is "the study of mathematical models of conflict and cooperation between intelligent rational decision-makers".[. . .An alternative term suggested "as a more descriptive name for the discipline" is interactive decision theory." Game Theory.

You are correct that the basic concepts of Game Theory (gasp, my first class in it was in the late 1970s, makes me feel older than dirt!), are certainly used in many disciplines to explain the actions of humans or to do predictions of behavior. Psychology, Biology, Economics and even Anthropology. A friend received his Ph.D. (Dr. Russell McGoodwin, University of Texas) in the 1970s based on a thesis that looked at random actions of Shark fishermen off the coast of Baja, and by looking at game theory could prove that their decisions, which appeared random, gave definite measurable proof that they were in fact increasing their odds for success.

I don't assume that to use an off the shelf game or to create something to gamify your class requires a full understanding of game theory, but to understand the concept of different types of games and outcomes is helpful, examples: cooperative v non-cooperative, Symmetric and asymmetric, Zero-sum and non-zero-sum, Simultaneous and sequential, Perfect information and imperfect information, and Combinatorial games, may assist an education in choosing the correct game for the intended result.

There is one game right now that is available Zero Escape - Virtues Last Reward where the game playing mechanics even mention the Prisoner's Dilemma. The trailer is so good it is worth the wait to see it! I like one of the taglines "The choices you make in the future affect the past."

I saw you have published games, I have a game I created back in 1976 that was optioned by Psychology Today Magazine (got a nice $1000 for that), it followed a Monopoly type-board, it was called the "The Prison Game," I don't even have a copy of it any more. PT was publishing a pull-out game in every issue, alas they stopped doing that before my game was published. I certainly relied on a lot of game theory.

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#8150603 Jul 17, 2013 at 01:56 PM
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110 Posts
Ah ok, you are familiar with the term already. I hear "game theory" used incorrectly a lot, so I just wanted to make sure. :)

While "game theory" is certainly useful in game design, it's not the same as "game design theory" or "game studies" which studies how games work. I think understanding games is certainly useful if you want to gamify a class.
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#8150639 Jul 17, 2013 at 02:01 PM
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561 Posts
#8150603 blueAppaloosa wrote:

Ah ok, you are familiar with the term already. I hear "game theory" used incorrectly a lot, so I just wanted to make sure. :)

While "game theory" is certainly useful in game design, it's not the same as "game design theory" or "game studies" which studies how games work. I think understanding games is certainly useful if you want to gamify a class.



Thanks I agree that understanding games is useful for those trying to gamify a class. Just in case you are interested here is a link to Russell's dissertation Economy and work on the northwest Mexican littoral : an analysis of labor recruitment among the shark fishermen of Teacapan, Sinaloa / by James Russell McGoodwin. He was teaching the first game theory class I took and has remained my friend, I was an older student so we are about the same age.
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#8162091 Jul 19, 2013 at 05:12 PM
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110 Posts
Heh, I will bow to your superior knowledge of game theory, Grasshopper98. I can tell you tons about game design theory, or theories of fun or flow, but I only know game theory as it relates to game design. :)
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#8162759 Jul 19, 2013 at 08:05 PM
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111 Posts
Geez, you people know so much it makes my head spin. I could tell you just about anything about any game I've played for a while, but when you get into things like design theory...I have an unfortunate tendency to start zoning out.

In unrelated news, Canvas causes my browser to crash. Anyone else have this issue?
Here's to all the educated people who don't hate games!
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#8175965 Jul 22, 2013 at 05:55 PM
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561 Posts
#8162091 blueAppaloosa wrote:

Heh, I will bow to your superior knowledge of game theory, Grasshopper98. I can tell you tons about game design theory, or theories of fun or flow, but I only know game theory as it relates to game design. :)



We would make a great team! :)
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#8175980 Jul 22, 2013 at 05:59 PM
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561 Posts
#8162759 Hawkye wrote:

Geez, you people know so much it makes my head spin. I could tell you just about anything about any game I've played for a while, but when you get into things like design theory...I have an unfortunate tendency to start zoning out.

In unrelated news, Canvas causes my browser to crash. Anyone else have this issue?



I didn't have that issue (Canvas crashing), but I can tell you that Lord of the Rings Online, cause my computer to think twice about its speed....LOL. It is off my computer now. . .

No in reality since I know you, you have the same if not more knowledge than I do, game experience really takes you through it all you just have to stop and think about it, its like driving a race car, you may be successful at winning races and strategy on the track, but you might not know everything about the dynamics of wind, or the tweaking of the engine components, but you would be a FAST learner because of your real-life (in this case virtual worlds) experience.
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