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#8175170 Jul 22, 2013 at 03:17 PM
53 Posts
If one keeps in mind that WoW is literally a World, with its own curacy, market, political issues, fashion, and fads one could easily use it for just about anything. Looking at more in depth story lines such as the Pandaren, Goblin, and Worgren races, you could use it as an example of cause and effect or go deeper and use it for psychology classes. It also can show the change of a government and how the chain of command can change depending on certain factors and social standing. The Market place and auction houses are a great example of the economics of the world and supply and demand. Furthermore the introduction of having one or more jobs while in the game also touches on this fact. When I mention fads in the game this could be tied to what events people pay close attention to as well as a poll of what classes and races are chosen. Which is more popular A or B? With examining this aspect of the game one can again go back to Psychology or even Sociology. Examine it as you would the real world and you will find that there's just as many things to explore in it.
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#8175546 Jul 22, 2013 at 04:36 PM
Initiate
52 Posts
Good point. I hate to keep bringing it back to cost but if it wasn't for the cost, of all the different expansions and the monthly fee, I would even be brave enough to propose that I could use it in Science.

I could have students look at say the difference in how the Orcs use the land versus the Night Elves. Orcs leave death and destruction in their path as they use up resources while the Night Elves live in peace with the land and nature. How do Tauren Druids live knowing they are part of a Horde that is so destructive to nature? But that's another story. Back to Science, students can look at how the ecosystems are affected. Different professions have different needs and some parts of WoW have more materials than others. Hmm, bet we could do something with that!

Students can study the living things in the World of Warcraft worlds and compare them to ours and do a comparison or determine if such life forms are based on real Science.

I would love to do that!
Al Gonzalez
Middle School Science Teacher
educatoral.com
Twitter educatoral
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#8176033 Jul 22, 2013 at 06:10 PM
53 Posts
OOOO!!! I love that idea. The effects one spieces has on its ecosystem versus another! =3 That's absolutely BRILIANT!

#8175546 EducatorAl wrote:

Good point. I hate to keep bringing it back to cost but if it wasn't for the cost, of all the different expansions and the monthly fee, I would even be brave enough to propose that I could use it in Science.

I could have students look at say the difference in how the Orcs use the land versus the Night Elves. Orcs leave death and destruction in their path as they use up resources while the Night Elves live in peace with the land and nature. How do Tauren Druids live knowing they are part of a Horde that is so destructive to nature? But that's another story. Back to Science, students can look at how the ecosystems are affected. Different professions have different needs and some parts of WoW have more materials than others. Hmm, bet we could do something with that!

Students can study the living things in the World of Warcraft worlds and compare them to ours and do a comparison or determine if such life forms are based on real Science.

I would love to do that!

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#8178741 Jul 23, 2013 at 09:01 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
Actually, there is a "Starter Edition" for World of Warcraft that doesn't cost. It has quite a few restrictions, including not being able to access the Auction House or Mailbox and being unable to level above level 20. However, for what you mentioned, EducatorAl, the Starter Edition might work. https://us.battle.net/support/en/article/world-of-warcraft-starter-edition-account-faq

There is always the concern of having enough computer "oomph" though and getting it installed in the classroom. However, these are not complete insurmountable.

I've used WoW, myself, as inspiration for an Illustration class. I only got the chance to do it once, but I really enjoyed the final projects that came out of it.

As Trevyn mentions, WoW is a world unto itself. You could do all kinds of cultural studies in it, I imagine. There are different accents, cultures, architectural styles, and so on.

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#8181032 Jul 23, 2013 at 05:46 PM
Initiate
52 Posts
#8178741 Leedale wrote:

Actually, there is a "Starter Edition" for World of Warcraft that doesn't cost. It has quite a few restrictions, including not being able to access the Auction House or Mailbox and being unable to level above level 20. However, for what you mentioned, EducatorAl, the Starter Edition might work. https://us.battle.net/support/en/article/world-of-warcraft-starter-edition-account-faq



Whoa, Leedale, this could be a game changer. I'm liking the sound of this free starter edition. That free to play forever is true, right? I'll look into it!

Computers having the oomph to run it is a consideration for sure. I'll run it by my IT guy and see what he says.

Thanks!
Al Gonzalez
Middle School Science Teacher
educatoral.com
Twitter educatoral
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#8183542 Jul 24, 2013 at 07:24 AM
Guild Officer
187 Posts
Yes, that's my understanding! :-) Blizzard (the makers of WoW) apparently is trying to compete with the many "free-to-play" MMORPGs out there. Hopefully it'll work for you! I know some educators who are still disappointed that students cannot get into the Auction House using the Starter Edition (mostly economics, business, and accounting teachers). Good luck to you!
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#8216316 Jul 30, 2013 at 04:19 PM
Initiate
4 Posts
Definitely, WOW has some values in Education. But my only worry is that what we should do if students become addicted to WOW. Should we be blamed for introducing a game to the students?
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#8221018 Jul 31, 2013 at 01:43 PM
Initiate
110 Posts
"Definitely, WOW has some values in Education. But my only worry is that what we should do if students become addicted to WOW. Should we be blamed for introducing a game to the students?"

While I would never condone having students do something in class that could be harmful to them, at a certain point they are responsible for their own actions. Even as a teacher, you really can't control the actions of your students, and shouldn't be responsible for everything they do. I honestly don't think playing WoW (or any video game) in class would fall under "harmful" to students.

Of course, parents may feel otherwise.

As for addiction, in almost all cases of game addiction there's something else going on. Often the person is already feeling like they've lost control of their life, and games give them a way to feel like they're in control of at least *something*. Unlike real life, games have knowable and fair rules, and success is always rewarded. This can be quite appealing to someone who feels like the world is out to get them.

Extra Credits recently did a great video on Game Compulsion, which is well worth watching.
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